Day: August 2, 2020

Samsung crafts India comeback as anti-China wave surges

By Sankalp Phartiyal and Heekyong Yang

NEW DELHI/SEOUL (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd is forging a comeback in India’s smartphone market with a new range of budget devices and a ramped-up online presence, aiming to recoup ground ceded to Chinese rivals such as Xiaomi Corp.

Samsung, the only major non-Chinese player in the country, has already begun to gain ground, and a surge in anti-China sentiment in India following a border clash in June is expected to provide a fresh boost.

Samsung jumped to the No. 2 spot with 26% market share in the second quarter behind Xiaomi’s 29%, according to tech researcher Counterpoint, as the South Korean company’s diverse and inhouse supply chain helped it avoid product delays suffered by rivals during coronavirus lockdowns.

It was in third position with a 16% share in the previous quarter.

Once the unrivalled leader in the world’s second-biggest smartphone market, Samsung

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More pro athletes opt out of season, Birx warns rural US, Texas doc fights ‘war against COVID, war against stupidity’

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion package Sunday, with stimulus checks, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Texas was among several states setting records for deaths in a week. One physician lamented that he

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How Kevin Costner made one of the most expensive movies ever

Memo to all aspiring filmmakers: When Steven Spielberg tells you not to do something, you’d be wise to listen.

Kevin Costner and Kevin Reynolds learned that lesson the hard way during the production of their 1995 action epic, Waterworld. Set in a dystopian tomorrow where the polar ice caps have melted, erasing “dryland” and bathing the world in water, the movie was conceived as an ambitious aquatic Western with a science-fiction twist. But when Waterworld washed ashore in cinemas 25 years ago this summer, all anyone could talk about was the out-of-control budget and behind-the-scenes creative battles that culminated with Costner replacing Reynolds in the editing room.

According to Waterworld screenwriter, Peter Rader, the source of the movie’s many troubles stemmed from one fateful decision: the choice to shoot the entire film on the open water rather than in a controlled environment like a studio water tank. (Watch our

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NASA astronauts splash down in SpaceX Dragon capsule, capping historic mission

The first mission to send NASA astronauts into orbit on a commercially owned spaceship came back down to Earth today with the splashdown of a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule in the Gulf of Mexico.

“On behalf of the SpaceX and NASA teams, welcome back to planet Earth, and thanks for flying SpaceX,” Mike Heiman, a lead member of SpaceX’s operations team, told astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken.

The splashdown closed out a 64-day mission to the International Space Station, aimed at testing the first SpaceX Dragon to carry crew. The reusable spacecraft was dubbed Endeavour as a tribute to earlier spaceships.

In May, Endeavour’s launch atop SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket made history, and today’s return to Earth did as well: It was the first time since 1975 that a crewed NASA spacecraft returned to Earth at sea, and the first space landing in the Gulf of Mexico.

NASA and

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Sturgis readies for 250,000 bikers; Texas doc fights ‘war against COVID, war against stupidity’; Birx warns rural US

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion package Sunday, with stimulus checks, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Texas was among several states setting records for deaths in a week. One physician lamented that he

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Pandemic ushers in a ‘new normal’ for historically underfunded HBCUs

When South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, a Republican, issued an order in early March to close all public schools to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Roslyn Clark Artis jumped into action.

Artis, the president of Benedict College — a private, historically Black liberal arts school in Columbia — knew she had to evacuate roughly 2,000 students from campus, which she described as a “herculean effort.”

“I put out a bat signal, a call for help, and sent a letter to my board of trustees and within 24 hours they raised $54,000 and we set up a travel agency in my office,” Artis told NBC News in a phone interview.

The school ended up buying more than 100 plane, bus and train tickets to get the students with greatest need home, started a 24-hour shuttle service from the campus to local airports, bought luggage for students, paid baggage fees and

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What are “Dead Bedrooms”? (Plus 4 Tips for Avoiding Them)

If you and your S.O. haven’t done the deed in six months or longer, you are not alone. In fact, you are trending. If you believe recent headlines, tons of married or long-term couples all over the world are in the midst of a full-blown sex strike. Even Pink is talking about it: “…you’ll go through times when you haven’t had sex in a year,” the singer and mom of two recently said of her 13-year marriage to Carey Hart. “Is this bed death? Is this the end of it? Do I want him? Does he want me? Monogamy is work! But you do the work and it’s good again.”

According to the New York Post, “’Dead bedrooms,’ the buzzy new term for when couples in long-term relationships stop having sex, are on a zombie-apocalypse-like rise.” It cites a study that shows 69 percent of couples are intimate 8

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With remote back-to-school, child care challenges for providers, families emerge

Student Masks.
Student Masks.

CINCINNATI – As school officials chalk up plans for students to learn off-site, in schools or both this fall, child care providers across the country are working to create more safe spaces and care scenarios for kids. 

And they’re doing it under pressure.

School plans are iffy, so solutions must be fluid. Care centers are already working with their own coronavirus pandemic guidelines for children, often with crippling costs. 

“We are in the midst of a tornado, and we’re trying to figure out how to educate in the middle of it. The tornado is COVID-19. It is not letting up,” said Jorge Perez, president and CEO of YMCA of Greater Cincinnati.

“The systems are in flux. We are going to have to be speedy. We are going to need additional funding.”

That need was expressed nationwide among child care providers who took part in a survey from the 

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Texas doc fights ‘war against COVID and war against stupidity’; Birx warns rural Americans; stimulus talks drag on

Congressional leaders and White House officials return to the bargaining table this week with a $1 trillion package of stimulus checks, jobless benefit bonuses and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All combatants agree that some progress was made in talks Saturday, but no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among major sticking points – what will replace the $600 weekly unemployment benefit bonus that expired last week. The bonus more than doubled unemployment checks issued to tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of pandemic-driven recession.

““We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy … on the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Texas was among several states setting records for deaths in a week. One physician lamented

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Unemployed Floridians face tough times in August without $600 weekly federal benefit

For the last four months, unemployed Floridians were handed a lifeline through the $600 weekly benefits doled out by the federal CARES Act.

The payments were a critical supplement to Florida’s standard benefits, which are among the stingiest in the nation. And the $9 billion in payments sent to Floridians was a major boost to the state’s fraying economy, which has been decimated by the pandemic.

No longer.

Because Congress failed to reach a deal before the $600 checks expired Friday, unemployed Floridians are going to have to live — at least for now — on payments of no more than $275 per week.

Nearly 900,000 Floridians applied for or received unemployment benefits during the most recent period. Nearly 600,000 Floridians are behind on their power bills. The only thing keeping many from being evicted from their homes is an executive order by Gov. Ron DeSantis — a short-term solution

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