Day: August 13, 2020

What Will College Look Like in Fall 2020?

From Seventeen

Any other year, incoming college freshmen would be filled with giddy anticipation at this very moment, counting down the weeks until they get to step on to their awaiting campus. They’d be making a packing list, trying to decide whether or not their beloved stuffed animal should make the journey to their dorm room or stay behind with their high school years. They’d be awkwardly chatting with their future roommates, comparing sleep schedules, asking about majors, and subtly trying to figure each other out.

While some 17 and 18-year-olds are doing that right now, many are not. Instead, they’re getting ready to buckle down for another semester of Zoom classes. They’re trying to imagine living under their parent’s roof for the next few months, instead of on the dorm floor like they planned. This semester, the coronavirus pandemic is forcing hundreds of thousands of college students to stay

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California oil production limits stall in Legislature, leaving the issue to Newsom

Oil derrick pumps just north of the Kern County town of McKittrick. <span class="copyright">(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Oil derrick pumps just north of the Kern County town of McKittrick. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

In his first year in office, Gov. Gavin Newsom vowed to protect Californians against hazards and pollutants from oil and gas production. Now the governor is facing increasing pressure to make good on his promise after efforts in the Legislature to mandate health and safety buffer zones around oil and gas wells and refineries failed amid fierce opposition from the petroleum industry and trade unions.

Legislation to put in place minimum setback distances between the wells and residential areas, along with public places such as schools and playgrounds, failed passage in a state Senate committee last week. The proposal faced a rough go from the outset, with resistance coming from Republicans and some pro-labor and Central Valley Democrats, underscoring the continued political muscle of California’s billion-dollar oil industry — even in a

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South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem among influential Women of the Century from Mount Rushmore State

It takes a strong person to live in South Dakota.

The harsh winters, the isolation of rural parts of the state, and the uncertainty of relying on Mother Nature to provide a livelihood in agriculture are all reasons some may choose to avoid living in the Mount Rushmore State. 

But for those who live here, there’s beauty in the prairie, in the Black Hills, in the serenity of a cold winter day. There’s also ample opportunity to make an impact on the community, and from the state’s inception, South Dakota women have been making their mark.

In August, America marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, when women gained the legal right to vote. In commemoration of the occasion, the USA TODAY Network is naming 10 American women from all 50 states and the District of Columbia who’ve made significant contributions to their respective states and country as Women

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New Jersey Couple Married for 62 Years Die of COVID-19 on the Same Day, 2 Days After Son’s Death

Codey & Jones funeral Home Larry and Vicki Freda

A New Jersey couple described as “inseparable” died from the novel coronavirus just hours apart after losing their son to the same disease two days prior.

Newark natives Lawrence “Larry” Freda, 85, and Victoria “Vicki” Freda, 83, were married for 62 years when they died of COVID-19 on April 24, according to their online obituaries. Their 51-year-old son, John Freda, died of coronavirus on April 22.

N.J Gov. Phil Murphy honored the trio in a series of tweets on Wednesday, writing, “We remember Larry and Vicki Freda, and their son, John. One family.”

“Larry and Vicki loved being grandparents, and always had fun,” he added. “May God bless these three souls.”

Larry served in the U.S. Army at an outpost in Europe before embarking on a 24-year career at the Pabst Blue Ribbon Brewery in his hometown, according to

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Fauci says temperature checks not reliable

Over 20.7 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 5.2 million diagnosed cases and at least 166,777 deaths.

Biden calls for nationwide mask mandate Fauci says temperature checks not reliable for screening Florida tops 9,000 deaths

Here’s how the news is developing. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

The Southern Conference is postponing its fall conference competition, including football, conference officials said Thursday.

Non-conference games are allowed if … Read More

Huge savings on bikes for kids of all ages

 Kids bike deals
Kids bike deals

Teaching your kids to ride a bike is a task that every parent will face, and there are multiple ways to go about it. 

Typically, the process consisted of a number of months using stabilisers followed by that unnerving-but-joyous day when the stabilisers came off. The invention of the balance bike put paid to that timeline for many households, allowing toddlers to master the coordination of steering before they’re tasked with pedalling. 

The balance bike method seems a much safer series of events, but it does come with the caveat that your first trip to the bike shop happens earlier than it otherwise would. This ultimately leads to an extra bike in the stable and an additional hole in your budget, albeit thankfully, a balance bike will be loose change in comparison to the bikes your kids are going to want when they grow up. 

Kids’ bikes,

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Land a New Job With an Ageless Resume

Working as a real estate broker wasn’t giving Cort Howard the steady income he wanted or enough time with his family, so last October he began looking for a new job. In addition to networking, Howard, 54, hired Joe Konop, owner of One Great Resume, to help him craft a resume that highlighted his relevant experience and skills, not his age.

 The ageless resume omitted key dates while emphasizing Howard’s sales experience and the 15 online technology courses he’d recently completed. The $350 Howard spent for the resume, cover letter and an edited LinkedIn profile produced a big payoff: By late December, Howard landed a salaried position as a territory sales manager with a software manufacturer.

Even in the best of times, older workers may have difficulty attracting prospective employers, who typically prefer tech-savvy younger generations that can be hired for less money. But these are not the best of

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Newborn among Minnesota children recently hospitalized

Over 20.6 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 5.2 million diagnosed cases and at least 166,361 deaths.

Florida tops 9,000 deaths At least 561 inmates test positive at Florida prison Newborn among Minnesota children recently hospitalized

Here’s how the news is developing. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates.

With 148 new deaths reported in hard-hit Florida on Wednesday, the state’s death toll has now surpassed 9,000, the … Read More

The coronavirus pandemic should force a rethink of higher education

Sara Goldrick-Rab is Professor of Sociology and Medicine and Founding Director of the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University. Christine Baker-Smith is Managing Director and Director of Research at the Hope Center.

As the fall season approaches, students and higher education administrators are preparing for a difficult return to college.

With both the coronavirus pandemic and overdue attention to systemic racism confronting the sector, one thing is clear: For many, a new mindset is required to produce positive results for students. 

The American public and a preponderance of legislators think college is still 20 or even 30 years ago. Say “undergraduate” and their minds conjure a rose-colored, movie-constructed utopian scene: Mom and Dad dropping off their son at his new dorm, setting him up to study for a bachelor’s degree fueled by sushi from the dining hall, parties with his friends, perhaps a part-time job at

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Hotels housing college students in effort to social distance

When Bailey Hedges requested where she wanted to live on campus this fall during her first semester at the University of Pittsburgh, staying in a hotel wasn’t an option.

Until it was.

The university followed up with Hedges, 18, after she submitted her initial on-campus housing application to find out if she’d want to live at a hotel instead. She said yes – skeptically.

“I didn’t know if other people were going to be in the hotel that weren’t students,” she told USA TODAY. But it turned out her hotel, the Wyndham University Center, located on campus, would be completely full of first-year students, so “it feels like I’m dorming anyway,” she said. Her room includes traditional hotel room decor like a dresser and desk, but her One Direction shower curtain is a reminder the room belongs to a student.

Hotel chains, including Wyndham, Hilton and Graduate Hotels, are working

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