Education

Pandemic Drives Working Americans to Seek Further Education

New survey from Bright Horizons EdAssist Solutions® reveals value of education opportunities, including promoting equity in the workplace

The COVID-19 pandemic ignited a shift in how working Americans view continuing education, according to a new survey commissioned by Bright Horizons EdAssist Solutions® (NYSE: BFAM). The survey revealed the 85% of full and part-time employed Americans feel employers need to rethink their benefits offerings in light of the pandemic.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005167/en/

What are employees looking for in this current climate? Education opportunities. 78% of working Americans believe the pandemic has increased the need for companies to support their employees with education benefits, including tuition reimbursement for degree and non-degree programs and student loan repayment programs.

What’s more, education benefits are not only driving employee motivation, but they may be a key factor in promoting workplace equality. According to the survey, nearly

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Donald Trump vs. Joe Biden: Where they stand on COVID, education and more

Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths.

President Donald Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic imperatives and frames himself as a conservative champion in the culture wars. The president has offered few details about how he would pull the levers of government in a second term. His most consistent argument focuses on stopping Democratic opponent Joe Biden and his party from pushing U.S. policy leftward.

Biden, for his part, is not the socialist caricature depicted by Trump. But he is every bit a center-left Democrat who frames the federal government as the force to combat the coronavirus, rebuild the economy and address centuries of institutional racism and systemic inequalities. The former vice president and U.S. senator also offers his deal-making past as evidence

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Meghan Markle Says Denying Education To Girls Is ‘Robbing’ Society Of Cultural Richness

KEY POINTS

  • Meghan Markle says educating girls opens the door for “societal success”
  • Markle and Prince Harry joined Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai for a video call on International Day of the Girl Child
  • Prince Harry shared that educating young girls can also help address climate change

Meghan Markle recently delivered an important message, saying that denying education to girls is like “robbing” the society of its cultural richness.

Markle and husband Prince Harry recently joined Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai on a video call and discussed how education plays an important role in the lives of young girls on International Day of the Girl Child, which was observed Sunday.

“When young girls have access to education, everyone wins and everyone succeeds. It just opens the door for societal success at the highest level. It’s not just robbing society of the cultural richness that comes with educating young

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D.C. 2020 school board candidates

But while these nonpartisan positions wield little power, they have become symbolic battlegrounds over the future of public education — and the members of the board have emerged as visible education advocates in the city.

Some of the issues dividing the board are mayoral control and, of course, how schools should safely reopen. They also have different opinions on the five-star rating system of schools. The ratings — part of a broader school report card — aim to make school data more accessible. But critics fear the reliance on test scores will reserve the highest accolades for schools that educate the city’s wealthiest students and give paltry ratings to schools that serve the District’s vulnerable children.

This election cycle has drawn nearly 20 candidates for five open seats. (Frazier O’Leary, who holds the Ward 4 seat, is running for reelection unopposed.) And the candidates have attracted tens of thousands of

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CSU sees 12% drop in freshman enrollment during pandemic, but online education surging

Enrollment at Colorado State University is down in multiple categories — freshmen, undergraduates, international students and first-generation students — though the number of people signing up for online education has risen, a reflection of student behavior during the COVID-19 era, university officials said Friday.

Total enrollment on the Fort Collins campus decreased 3.6%, with a total headcount of 27,835 this fall, and 3.3% at the Pueblo campus, for a total of 3,716 students this semester.

“Remarkably during a pandemic year, CSU Pueblo increased student retention more than at any time in the last decade (a 5 percentage point increase) and CSU in Fort Collins held steady, retaining 85.3% of its 2019 freshman class, exactly the same percentage as the previous year when COVID-19 was not a factor,” CSU officials said in a news release.

The Fort Collins campus welcomed 23,590 undergraduates this fall, a 4.1% decline from last year with

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Teacher shortage, Covid-19 create perfect storm for education system

The debate over how and where to educate students, from preschool to university, has been among the fiercest fought throughout the pandemic. Nearly every solution presents challenges for parents, students and teachers alike.

The Covid-19 crisis and an ongoing nationwide shortage of qualified teachers have created a perfect storm in the education system that may only worsen in the months to come.

Educators such as Cynthia Robles are feeling it firsthand.

Robles is a special education teacher at Roger Williams Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island, with more than two decades of experience. She is currently working in school, doing both in-person and remote learning, while helping to cover other classes during unassigned periods to make up for a lack of substitute teachers in the district.

“It’s truly a challenge every day. Teaching is challenging anyway, but with the lack of teachers in some rooms, and the rest of us

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Houston ISD considering $17 million increase in special education spending

Houston ISD Interim Superintendent Grenita Lathan is asking the district’s school board Thursday to authorize $17 million in additional spending for special education, a request that comes a week after her administration dismissed a state investigation sharply critical of HISD’s support of students with disabilities.

HISD administrators said they plan to use the money to hire more speech language pathologists, mental health specialists, occupational and physical therapists, and assistive technology specialists, among others.

District officials have offered scant details on the request, other than listing the job titles in a press release. HISD administrators did not respond to questions Wednesday about the proposal, including how many employees would be hired and why they are needed.

HISD administrators listed the $17 million request as a line item in a budget document posted last week, but they offered no explanation of the request. Board members did not ask about the request during

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Work Or Online Learning? Homeless Families Face An Impossible Choice : NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR


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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

The closure of school buildings in response to the coronavirus has been disruptive and inconvenient for many families, but for those living in homeless shelters or hotel rooms — including roughly 1.5 million school-aged children — the shuttering of classrooms and cafeterias has been disastrous.

For Rachel, a 17-year-old sharing a hotel room in Cincinnati with her mother, the disaster has been academic. Her school gave

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Our endorsements: The Sun offers its choices for regents, state Board of Education, Clark County Commission and Clark County School Board races

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Las Vegas Sun

The Clark County Government Center is seen Friday, Sept. 27, 2013.

Editor’s note: Candidates receiving the Sun’s endorsements are listed in bold type.

NEVADA BOARD OF REGENTS

The Sun will preface our endorsements here by saying the most important vote regarding the Board of Regents will be on Ballot Question 1 — the measure that would pave the way for reform of the higher-education system by removing the regents from the state constitution.

We’ll write far more about this issue, but the upshot is that it’s time for the regents and the system’s administrative overlords to be brought under control. As is, the way the regents were written into the Nevada Constitution has created confusion over the years about the extent of the board’s authority, with the regents at times claiming it makes the higher-ed system a separate, fourth branch

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Trump’s push for ‘patriotic education’ ignores the complexity of our national story

Florida Today

History is not about exceptionalism. It is about confronting the past to help inform the present. Individuals who only wish to espouse an exceptionalism narrative are ignoring a fundamental truth that must be shared: There are always victims as well as victors, and decisions have consequences.

History also is not simple or straightforward. To argue otherwise is not to fully understand it. The recent call by the Trump administration to counter what he called “the crusade against American history” by pushing “patriotic education” is an example of the oversimplification of our understanding of the past. As the late historian J.M. Roberts famously argued, “History is the story of mankind, of what it has done, suffered, and enjoyed.”

I have spent my career teaching introductory courses to university students in the history of the United States, Europe, Africa, and the world. Students often come to the classroom with a

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