Education Indoor & Outdoor

Lessons from a Robinhood Trader’s Suicide

As an advocate for young adults prudently beginning their investing journey as soon as possible, I’ve found it difficult to shake this recent story: A young man from Illinois took his own life less than 24 hours after checking his Robinhood account and seeing a negative cash balance of over $730,000. 

For those who might not know, Robinhood is an online trading and investing platform that has become incredibly popular in recent years for the movement it sparked in the brokerage industry toward commission-free trading. The service boasts more than 13 million users with an average age of 31. Almost every incumbent broker must now offer this feature, lest they be unable to compete effectively against lower-cost peers.  

But this story isn’t just about Robinhood. In recent years, several Robinhood alternatives have sprouted up offering similar functionality for the same cost and often induce investors to sign up with the lure of free stocks or sign-up bonuses, fractional share investing, near-instant account opening and no account or investment minimums.  In other words, all elements a young investor might desire to begin investing in small amounts.

What many of these new investing platforms promote is simplified, free trading with fun and easy-to-use mobile app interfaces.  Robinhood, in particular, utilizes a slick interface with confetti popping everywhere as if you had just won a prize when you execute a trade.

A College Student Dies in Despair

Alexander Kearns, a 20-year old University of Nebraska student who was home from college during

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If you’re just taking online classes, you can’t stay in the U.S.

ICE to foreign students: If you’re just taking online classes, you can’t stay in the U.S.
ICE to foreign students: If you’re just taking online classes, you can’t stay in the U.S.

The coronavirus pandemic has made education hard enough with the abrupt shift to online learning that schools, teachers, and students have had to suddenly make these past few months. Now, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement would like to make that move even harder for foreign students.

On Monday, ICE to its Student and Exchange Visitor Program which disallows foreign students from remaining in the U.S. if they’re enrolled in a college or university that’s planning all online courses for the fall semester.

Basically, if you’re in the U.S. on a student visa and attending a school with all remote learning, you have two options: You must leave the country or transfer to a school with in-person learning. Any failure to comply will result in deportation.

Furthermore, if you’re a student planning to enter the country on a student visa in order to attend a remote-semester school in the fall, you will not be allowed in the U.S.

As schools across the country struggle with reopening plans as the fall semester fast approaches, ICE’s new rules certainly don’t make things easier. The coronavirus pandemic remains an ongoing issue, and one that’s worsening in some parts of the country.

“In yet one more in a long line of attacks on legal immigration, the Trump administration is now closing the doors to immigrant students,” said New York Immigration Coalition VP of Policy Anu Joshi in a statement.

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The COVID-19 pandemic affects the future of Gen Z travel

Clarissa Fisher, 23, is nowhere near ready to hop on a plane. She used to fly regularly to visit her boyfriend in the U.K.

“This past week, I have seen so many people return to their normal activities like nothing has happened,” says Fisher of  Frankfort, Kentucky. “This scares me and has made me reconsider my travel plans for the remainder of this year and possibly the next. I’m afraid to board a plane, knowing that I might step off infected. Being trapped in a small space with a large amount of strangers for several hours is a pandemic nightmare scenario.” 

Like others in her generation, she’s grown up with crisis after crisis: From 9/11 to devastating school shootings to COVID-19, this generation, born after 1996, is used to living in dangerous times. This generation is primed to handle crisis after crisis and will adapt to extra safety precautions.

Thirty-five percent of 18- to 34-year-olds don’t plan on going on vacation this year, according to a Morning Consult online poll last month commissioned by the American Hotel & Lodging Association – though 27% have taken a non-business trip, including an overnight stay, since March.

Members of Generation Z will approach travel differently by being much more cautious about stepping on a plane, washing their hands frequently and otherwise mitigating risks, concerned for their families and themselves. 

‘A worried generation’

Ann Fishman, a marketing expert who specializes in generational targeting, defines Gen Z as those born from 2001

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8th state surpasses 100K cases

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 535,000 people worldwide.

Over 11.5 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 2.9 million diagnosed cases and at least 130,101 deaths.

California’s positivity rate climbs Miami-Dade closing restaurants, gyms, rentals Harvard, Princeton announce back-to-school plans

Here’s how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates

As coronavirus cases rise in California, the state’s positivity rate has climbed to 6.8%, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday.

California recorded 5,699 new cases of the coronavirus on Sunday, bringing the seven-day average to 7,876 cases, Newsom said at a news conference.

Hospitalizations are also increasing, Newsom said.

Twenty-three counties are now on Newsom’s monitoring list, including Los Angeles and Sacramento, and newly added San Diego.

In those counties, bars must close, and restaurants and wineries must stop indoor operations.

Over the Fourth of July weekend the state’s Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control visited nearly 6,000 restaurants and bars and issued 52 citations, Newsom said.

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Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care and mental health physicians and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions such as sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors’ offices and delayed nonemergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others employed rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema Verma to say she “can’t imagine going back.”

Dr. Tiffany Link listens to a patient during a telehealth session in her spare bedroom in her home in Fort Collins, Colo., on May 20.
Dr. Tiffany Link listens to a patient during a telehealth session in her spare bedroom in her home in Fort Collins, Colo., on May 20.

After emergency legislation eased Medicare payment restrictions and allowed doctors to practice across state lines, some predicted a significant portion of Americans will choose to get care remotely as stay-at-home orders lift.

“There will be a wave of ongoing adoption and increased acceptance, even as the pandemic begins to wind down,” said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of OptumHealth. “I think the shift is permanent.”

‘Your own doctor

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