Education

De Blasio Failed New York Kids

Alternatively, he could have decided weeks, if not months ago to start the school year completely remote and announced that the city would gradually move toward in-person learning if conditions allowed for it.

But the mayor chose neither of those paths. He set deadlines that he refused to put in the work to meet, sowing chaos and ongoing frustration for families and teachers alike. How on Earth did he not foresee a staffing shortage? De Blasio has failed our kids and is teaching them a lesson about political leadership that I hope they never forget.

Our children have endured six months of hardship and fear and Zoom calls and canceled plans, and far too many have lost loved ones to this virus. The start of school, though, was a bright spot on the horizon for my family and so many others.

But even as I told my children that September

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whitewashing US history with ‘patriotic education’

Good morning,



a group of people in a room: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Weeks from the presidential election, and with a national reckoning on racial justice under way, Donald Trump has decided it is time to rewrite the American history curriculum to downplay the dark legacy of slavery.

Speaking at a conference in Washington DC on Thursday, the president announced a new national commission to promote “patriotic education” and counter the “decades of leftwing indoctrination” to which he claims US schoolchildren have been subjected. “Our youth will be taught to love America,” he said.

  • The president called his initiative the 1776 Commission, while attacking the New York Times’s Pulitzer prize-winning 1619 Project, which marked the 400th anniversary of the first slave ship arriving in America. Trump has threatened to cut funding to schools that teach the 1619 Project.

Biden says trust the scientists, not Trump, on Covid



Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: The Democratic nominee took part in an outdoor town hall meeting with CNN in Scranton, Pennsylvania, on Thursday. Photograph: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters


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Texas Education Agency assigns monitor over Manor school district – News – Austin American-Statesman

After a yearlong investigation into the alleged wrongdoing of the Manor school board president, the Texas Education Agency is assigning a monitor to oversee the Manor district and its school board members, according to a correction action plan sent to Manor this month and obtained by the American-Statesman.

A monitor, conservator or board of managers typically are assigned to a district for continuous low academic performance. Monitors are appointed by the education commissioner “to participate in and report to the agency on the activities of the board of trustees or the superintendent,” according to the agency.

The Texas Education Agency in August 2019 began reviewing complaints lodged against the Manor district after three district officials — two human resources employees and a trustee — said board President Elmer Fisher conspired with two other employees and other board trustees to oust the former superintendent, violating the Open Meetings Act by discussing

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New Haven to reopen classrooms for some special education students


NEW HAVEN — The school district will reopen 11 special education classrooms for in-person learning despite the rest of the buildings remaining closed for the first 10 weeks of the semester.

The Board of Education’s vote to allow schools to reopen for 11 special education classrooms is a step toward loosening its directive to keep schools closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19.


Director of Student Services Typhanie Jackson appealed to the board for the change as the state mandates specific evaluations for special education students and the state Department of Education has not granted waivers, so

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Indonesia’s education minister on Covid’s effect on students’ learning

SINGAPORE — There’s not enough discussion globally about the coronavirus pandemic’s effect on students’ learning as schools are closed to prevent further spread of the virus, Indonesia’s Education Minister Nadiem Anwar Makarim told CNBC on Monday.

“A lot of people keep mentioning about the health crisis and about the economic crisis that’s caused by the pandemic but not enough people are talking about the educational crisis, the learning crisis that is happening all around the world, not just in Indonesia,” the minister told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia.”

“So we really have to find the right balance between … the health crisis as well as the educational crisis as leaders,” he said ahead of the virtual Singapore Summit happening this week.

Students from a school in Surabaya, Indonesia’s East Java province, attend in-person lessons under strict health protocols during the coronavirus pandemic.

Budiono | Sijori images | Barcroft Media via Getty

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How an unprecedented, indefinite crisis forced education leaders to change the ways school districts operate

Snowstorms. Hurricanes. Shootings. Educators and the students they serve have long been at the mercy of crises; most have some sort of plan for disasters.

But with coronavirus, a new national emergency forced districts to rewrite their playbooks. While it’s obvious how COVID-19 changed the structure of school, what’s less known is how districts had to overhaul their operations.

To continue working safely, they had to change, and fast: Lengthy in-person meetings went online, where districts had more control over interactions and public input. Transparency laws changed. Some districts, like Seattle Public Schools, enabled superintendents to spend large sums of money without bureaucracy through the end of the 2019-2020 school year. And many local districts did not let reporters observe their first days of classes, citing privacy concerns and technical issues.

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Schooling solutions amid COVID-19

This story was produced with support from the Education Writers Association

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How Uruguay’s Internet Initiative Transformed Its Education System

By Sarah Simon

Education inequality in the United States was a problem long before the internet. With new educational tools requiring internet access, that inequality has only magnified. A 2018 study found that one in five US teens “can’t finish their homework because of the digital divide,” especially among Black teens and those from lower-income homes.

Making education more accessible, and at the same time adapting it to a digital era, is a universal struggle. But the small South American country of Uruguay—as it gains recognition for its “successful fight against COVID-19”—already had the skeleton of an emergency plan in place; the pandemic helped to flesh it out.

Uruguay isn’t often top of mind for average the American, so the fact that it is one of six countries to have successfully implemented the one laptop per child program (OLPC) offers essential food for thought: How couldn’t I have known about

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Gay-themed children’s book sparks education row in Taiwan

Sept 11 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – A gay-themed children’s book about two princes who fall in love and get married has sparked protests by parents in Taiwan, after it was added to a government-backed reading programme.

“King & King”, originally published in Dutch, follows the story of a young prince who was pressured by his mother to marry a princess but then falls in love with another prince.

The Chinese version of the book was added to a list of books that the government distributed to students aged six and seven this month in Taiwan, which last year became the first place in Asia to allow same-sex marriage.

The reading scheme is part of an extra-curricular programme aimed at fostering a love for reading, and is not compulsory in schools. Despite this, the move sparked protests outside the education ministry this week.

“This

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California Supreme Court denies O.C. Board of Education petition to reopen school campuses

The Orange County Board of Education’s bid to force California to re-open school campuses for in-person learning ended Wednesday when the California Supreme Court refused to hear the case.

Board of Education President Ken Williams expressed disappointment with the ruling.

“I am sorry that the state Supreme Court did not view that Governor Newsom has abused his emergency powers that are given to governors under a real healthcare crisis. Our families and children are suffering from not going to school.”

Last month, the board, along with a few parents and several private schools across California, took the unusual step of filing legal actions directly with the state Supreme Court.

Two lawsuits claimed that actions by Gov. Gavin Newsom and the California Department of Public Health to curb the spread of coronavirus were unconstitutional and violated the right to equal access to education. Newsom’s order effectively closed most school campuses to

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Department of Education sends mixed messages on transgender student protections

The Trump administration said it plans to investigate alleged discrimination against LGBTQ students following this summer’s landmark Supreme Court rulings that said sexual orientation and gender identity are protected traits under existing civil rights law — but only in certain circumstances, according to documents released by the Education Department’s Office of Civil Rights.

In updated guidance posted via a letter to various Connecticut schools, the Education Department said transgender students still can’t play on school sports teams that correspond with their gender identity and instead should be assigned to teams that correspond with their biological gender at birth.

At the same time, in a separate case, the department said it agreed to investigate claims of discrimination based on sexual orientation where a student alleged “homophobic bigot[ry]” at her school.

Sunu Chandy, the legal director at the National Women’s Law Center, said the two moves by the department are “totally at

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