University

1 billion students impacted by school closures; Census to end 2020 counting operations early; Hawaii cases surge

President Donald Trump is considering executive action as congressional leaders and White House officials struggle to reach a deal on the next coronavirus relief package.

As more schools across the country welcome students back to class this week, some are already temporarily reclosing because of COVID-19 concerns. In Indiana, one school is shutting down two days after an employee tested positive for the virus. In another Indiana school, a student tested positive after the first day back to school.

The United Nations estimates more than one billion students worldwide have been affected by school closures. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the pandemic has created the largest disruption to education in history.

Here are some significant developments:

  • The Census Bureau will halt all counting efforts by Sept. 30, a month earlier than planned.

  • The NFL and the NFL Players Association set Thursday as deadline for players planning to opt out of the

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How Beijing’s National Security Crackdown Transformed Hong Kong in a Single Month

After Beijing enacted a sweeping national security law for Hong Kong, the city’s leader tried to allay fears of a broad crackdown on dissent by promising the measure would affect only a very small minority of people.

But throughout July, the first full month under the new legislation, the measure featured prominently in a sustained effort to quell political upheaval in the enclave, while also ushering in a transformative climate of fear and uncertainty.

The law’s provisions — which punish crimes related to secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces — have been used as grounds for disqualifying political candidates, arresting students over social media posts and banning common protest slogans.

The blows to the city’s democracy movement over the past few weeks have extended beyond the far-reaching law itself. Academics who are key figures in the protests were fired from their posts, police raided the office of an

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The ultimate guide to reusable face coverings as England changes rules

We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock
We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that face masks and coverings will become part of daily life. The UK government and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have both advised wearing face coverings in a bid to reduce the infection transmission of Covid-19.

Since 24 July, face coverings have been mandatory in all shops, supermarkets, indoor shopping centres, banks, post offices and transport hubs in England. People who don’t wear one will face a fine of up to £100, apart from people with medical conditions and children under 11.

Boris Johnson announced an extension to these rules in a government briefing on 31 July. From 8 August, face masks will become compulsory in more indoor settings where you’re likely to come into contact with people you don’t normally meet,

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‘Locked in a vicious cycle’

Ebony Jones thought she was one of the lucky ones. Jones, a Black woman in her 30s, inherited a home her grandfather, a World War II veteran, had bought nearly seven decades earlier with the help of his GI Bill benefits.

But when Jones and her two children moved into the house in Compton, California, which was paid off almost 40 years ago, they soon discovered that sewage sometimes backed up in the living room and that the plumbing needed to be repaired. The distressing process of securing a home equity loan introduced Jones to an American reality.

Despite Jones’ good credit score, low debt-to-income ratio, better-than-average income and several thousand dollars of savings, lenders who immediately expressed interest stopped or went quiet when they got to two questions.

What was her ZIP code? Answer: 90220. That’s Compton, 29 percent black, 68 percent Latino.

Was she married? Answer: No.

Federal

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U.S. Cases Increase 0.9%; California, Arizona Slow: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) —

California and Arizona reported positive trends on new cases after battling a surge in infections last month. New Jersey, concerned about recent violations of social-distancing rules among young revelers, reduced crowd limits for indoor parties.

Eli Lilly & Co. will begin testing its Covid-19 antibody drug in nursing homes, a treatment with potential to protect vulnerable groups that vaccines may not cover. Global coronavirus cases surpassed 18 million, with the pandemic now adding a million infections every four days.

Iran’s virus death toll may have been almost three times larger than official counts, the BBC reported, while Hong Kong said it had the fewest number of new cases since July 22.

Key Developments

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18 million; deaths pass 689,000Fauci says face shields good idea for teachers back in schoolsU.K. reviewing Covid-fighting options including London lockdownFacing fierce new waves, virus hunters turn to sewage and

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Take Back the Economy From Economists

When I answer the phone, Zephyr Teachout quickly explains our call might be shorter than planned. Both she and I are at the whim of her two-year-old toddler, who is sleeping and could wake at any time.

Teachout, a law professor at Fordham University in New York, is best known for her runs for governor of the state and for Congress from New York’s 19th district (both races she lost). She has also written numerous books, including her latest, “BREAK ‘EM UP: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money.” Our discussion comes the day after historic Big Tech antitrust hearings in Congress. 

Teachout sees the antitrust discussion as a flashpoint for understanding how democracy and corruption collide. To her, concentrations of private power, as with the Big Tech companies, can’t be fixed with, say, campaign finance reform. These companies are a threat to the public sphere

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Where Are They Now? (Part 3)

Looking back at past MargU semesters, we sure can say we’ve come a long way! But what happens when we take a look forward? We spoke to several of our MargU alumni (you can read Part 1 of this series here and Part 2 here) to find out what they’re up to now and how Margaritaville University impacted their journeys.

Madelyn B.
University of Southern Mississippi, Hospitality and Tourism Management

My name is Madelyn, and I attended the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Miss. This also happens to be where the “boss man” himself attended college! I was there when USM dedicated a plaque outside of “The Hub” where Jimmy and original member of the Coral Reefer band, Greg Taylor, sat on the steps and jammed.

In 2018, I also graduated from MargU after being a member of the inaugural class. I am currently back in my hometown of

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Delta Flight Forced to Turn Around After 2 Passengers Refuse to Wear Face Masks

NurPhoto/Getty

A Delta flight was forced to return to its gate after two passengers refused to wear masks onboard amid the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

A spokesperson for the airline told PEOPLE in an email statement that the plane “returned to the gate following two customers who were non-compliant with crew instructions,” before adding that the plane departed to its destination “after a short delay.”

According to Delta’s website, “Delta customers and employees are required to wear a face mask, or appropriate cloth face covering over their nose and mouth throughout their travel, aligning with best practice guidelines from the CDC.”

RELATED: United Airlines Warns It May Layoff Half of Its U.S. Staff, 36,000 Employees: ‘A Last Resort’

MATT CAMPBELL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport

The incident occurred a day after Delta’s CEO Ed Bastian said that passengers who refuse to wear masks will be banned from flying with the airline.

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Here’s how to stay safe in the water, according to a former lifeguard

According to the CDC, an average of 3,536 people unintentionally drown every year — that’s roughly ten per day.

As a former lifeguard, swim and CPR instructor, I’ve been schooled in the nuances of water safety. Here’s what you need to know to keep your family safe at the lake, beach, and pool this summer.

What does drowning look like?

Unlike what you might see on TV, drowning may not involve screams, thrashing or hand signals. Look for a weak or inefficient kick, attempts to reach for the edge, and neutral or negative buoyancy.

What can you do if you think someone may be drowning? Experts recommend throwing anything that floats to the person. It could be a life jacket, swim noodle, or even an empty cooler with the top closed. 

“This is why ocean lifeguards use rescue buoys and tubes,” explains B. Chris Brewster, Chair of the National Certification

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University of Maryland students struggle to cancel housing leases

When South Campus Commons at the University of Maryland, College Park, canceled its apartment leases in March, Julia Kane called it “the right thing to do” during the pandemic.

By June, the university also gave students the option to cancel their fall housing agreements without penalty. But then South Campus Commons and The Courtyards, the public-private apartments owned by the Maryland Economic Development Corporation, told students they were legally bound to their leases.

Capstone On-Campus Management, the entity hired to manage the apartments, told 3,000 students with leases their only options were to re-lease to another student, to pay and live on-campus, or to pay and live at home, Kane said. Kane, a senior studying marketing and operations management and business analytics, managed to cancel her lease cost-free, but it only happened after days of pressure from her father, who is an attorney.

“When I signed this lease back in

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