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Journalist Maria Ressa Pleads Not Guilty to Tax Evasion

“What can we do? We have to hold the line every step of the way …”

Nearly a month after she was found guilty of cyber libel in the Philippines, respected journalist Maria Ressa is in court again. This time to plead not guilty to tax evasion in one of the many cases she and her online news site Rappler are facing.

Maria Ressa, CEO and executive editor, Rappler: “These charges are politically motivated. It is meant to harass, to intimidate. It is meant to be a war of attrition to try to make us afraid to keep reporting, and the best response to it is to keep reporting.”

SEE MORE: Maria Ressa Warns Erosion Of Democracy Is Happening In The U.S.

Ressa says she is holding the line for democracy in the Philippines. Ressa heads Rappler, which has been critical of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs. Human

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GOP senators consider $600 extension; Pfizer hopes for October vaccine OK; California cases top NY

The U.S. government has placed an initial order for 100 million doses of a vaccine candidate being developed by Pfizer and a German firm, BioNTech, for $1.95 billion, the companies announced Wednesday.

The U.S. can acquire up to 500 million additional doses, the statement said.

Meanwhile, federal unemployment benefits are taking a hit at a time when more states are abruptly pausing their reopening plans. The $600 weekly jobless benefits bonus, approved in March, is about to expire and likely won’t be extended or replaced before next month.

The U.S. has been averaging more than 60,000 new cases daily for multiple weeks, and hospitalizations have climbed to totals not seen in three months. A USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Tuesday shows 10 states set seven-day records for new cases while five states had a record number of deaths over the period.

📈 Today’s stats: The U.S.

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Symptoms of COVID-19? Here’s what you can do right now

Yahoo Life is committed to finding you the best services to help improve your life. We may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Pricing and availability is subject to change.

Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)
Telemedicine claims have surged more than 8000 percent during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: Getty Images)

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 is understandably terrifying. And, if you don’t have a primary care physician or you’re nervous to go to your doctor’s office or local hospital, it’s hard to know what to do.

That’s where telehealth comes in. Many doctor’s offices have shifted to providing healthcare through video chat or over the phone during the pandemic. For patients who don’t already have a provider, services like Amwell, one of the top telehealth platforms in the country, allow for quick and easy access to a doctor without a long wait time, and it’s relatively inexpensive for those who do

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If You’re Sick Of Zoom, You’ll Love These Brilliant Long-Distance Date Ideas

Photo credit: Kwanchai Lerttanapunyaporn / EyeEm - Getty Images
Photo credit: Kwanchai Lerttanapunyaporn / EyeEm – Getty Images

From Women’s Health

FaceTime fatigue in your long-distance relationship? Same. The good news: Brainstorming some exciting, long-distance date ideas that are more interesting than a video chat from your couch is easier than you think.

“According to multiple studies, the key to a successful LDR comes down to three factors: structure, clear expectations, and having mutual goals,” says Tara Suwinyattichaiporn, PhD, assistant professor of relational and sexual communication at California State University, Fullerton. “Scheduling remote dates hits all three of these factors. Your online dating life has a structure. You can expect when they’re going to happen. And, you’re mutually looking forward to the same goal, which is having a good time connecting.”

Megan Bearce, LMFT, relationship coach, speaker and author of the book Super Commuter Couples: Staying Together When A Job Keeps You Apart, echoes this

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Comic-Con 2020 Opens ‘At Home’ in Uncertain Times

To use the words of prophet and frequent convention attendee Hunter S. Thompson, when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. This year, the professional weirdness of Comic-Con has taken a twist, as the four-day event will take place exclusively online.

To their credit, organizers are trying to replicate the commercialized fan-friendly confines of the San Diego Convention Center as much as possible: there is the traditional souvenir book featuring a pretty sweet drawing of Ray Bradbury on a T. Rex on the cover that is available for free .pdf download (and featuring click-through advertisements!), and you can print your own badge (sponsored by Amazon Prime Video!) to wear as you sit in front of your screen at home. The Comic-Con homepage also will take you to an online Exhibit Hall, where there will be interactive exhibits and events offered by vendors.

There are literally hundreds of panels that … Read More

China Vows Retaliation After U.S. Shuts Down Houston Consulate

(Bloomberg) — China vowed retaliation after the U.S. forced the closure of its Houston consulate, prompting stocks to fall in one of the biggest blows to diplomatic ties between the two countries in decades.

The U.S. government gave China three days to close its consulate in America’s fourth-most populous city in an “unprecedented escalation,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a regular briefing Wednesday in Beijing. China planned to “react with firm countermeasures” if the Trump administration didn’t “revoke this erroneous decision,” Wang said.

The U.S. State Department subsequently confirmed in a statement that it had ordered the consulate closed “to protect American intellectual property and Americans’ private information.” It said international agreements required diplomats to respect the laws and regulations of the host nation and not interfere in its internal affairs.

The first signs of trouble came when Houston police and firefighters descended on the consulate following witness

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Betsy DeVos just crossed another line. She’s an ongoing danger to teachers and students.

As much of the country experiences an alarming surge of COVID-19 cases, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is carrying President Donald Trump’s water by demanding that states reopen their schools after the summer break. She makes this demand with no sense of how schools can do this safely. But just beneath her disregard for public health is a shocking ignorance about the fundamental nature of authority over public schools in this country. The secretary assumes she has that power and wants to run roughshod over those who do. In fact, shortly after making the demand, the governors of South Carolina, Iowa and Florida bowed to her assertion of authority, much to the dismay of educators in those states.

DeVos’ blanket demand that schools open is dangerous in its complete lack of consideration for student and teacher safety. She dismisses the risk of spreading COVID-19 among students, teachers and staff in school

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Duterte-critic journalist pleads not guilty in Philippine tax case

Manila (AFP) – Embattled Philippine journalist Maria Ressa pleaded not guilty Wednesday to tax evasion, as President Rodrigo Duterte’s government faced growing calls to drop all charges against the veteran reporter.

Ressa, 56, and her news site Rappler have been the target of a series of criminal charges and probes after publishing stories critical of Duterte’s policies, including his drug war that has killed thousands.

The award-winning former CNN journalist is on bail pending an appeal against a cyber libel conviction last month for which she faces up to six years in jail.

Ex-Rappler journalist Reynaldo Santos was also found guilty in that case.

In a video on Twitter after the hearing, Ressa said she pleaded not guilty to tax evasion — one of five tax-related charges she faces — in the capital Manila.

Her application to quash the charge was rejected by the judge and Rappler was added to

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All dressed up and nowhere to go

Tita Ghanjanasak dressed as Harley Quinn in "Batman: The Dark Prince Charming" at the San Diego State University Transit Station. Ghanjanasak has been going to Comic-Con for four years and her favorite thing to see is the "Game of Thrones" cosplay. <span class="copyright">(K.C. Alfred / The San Diego Union-Tribune)</span>
Tita Ghanjanasak dressed as Harley Quinn in “Batman: The Dark Prince Charming” at the San Diego State University Transit Station. Ghanjanasak has been going to Comic-Con for four years and her favorite thing to see is the “Game of Thrones” cosplay. (K.C. Alfred / The San Diego Union-Tribune)

With this week’s Comic-Con International moving online because of the coronavirus pandemic, there’s a whole world of cosplayers with a lot of creativity to show off. Since they can’t strut their stuff in the Gaslamp District, photographer K.C. Alfred asked them to suit up and show us their powers at various spots around San Diego County.

Dean LeCrone as Dr. Artemus Peepers

Dean LeCrone dressed as Dr. Artemus Peepers, a steampunk hero, at the Oceanside Pier. This would have been his 30th year attending Comic-Con. LeCrone, a cartoonist, said his favorite year was 2016, when he won the Syfy Channel's Weirdly Awesome Costume Contest. <span class="copyright">(K.C. Alfred / The San Diego Union-Tribune)</span>
Dean LeCrone dressed as Dr. Artemus Peepers, a steampunk hero, at the Oceanside Pier. This would have been his 30th year attending Comic-Con. LeCrone, a cartoonist, said his favorite year was 2016, when he won the Syfy Channel’s Weirdly Awesome
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Reopening plans at UC Berkeley, other campuses fall apart amid coronavirus surge

A group of students walk through the Sather Gate at UC Berkeley. <span class="copyright">(Eric Risberg / Associated Press)</span>
A group of students walk through the Sather Gate at UC Berkeley. (Eric Risberg / Associated Press)

Hopes that college life might begin a slow return to normal this fall were deflated Tuesday, when two University of California campuses announced they would begin the semester with fully remote instruction amid a pandemic surge.

UC Berkeley and UC Merced had hoped to open Aug. 26 with a mix of online, in-person and hybrid classes. But they reversed those plans as COVID-19 infections began their record-shattering increases throughout California, with cases now topping more than 400,000 and deaths, 7,800. In Los Angeles County, half of new COVID-19 cases were among those ages 18 to 40.

The UC reversals follow other decisions to do likewise by several California campuses, including USC, Pomona College and Occidental College. Nationally, the proportion of colleges and universities planning for in-person classes has declined from about two-thirds in

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