Like spring, Broward’s first day of school held online marred by some technical glitches

The virtual school door had problems opening Wednesday morning in Broward County. Students were met

The virtual school door had problems opening Wednesday morning in Broward County.

Students were met with login errors, slow connectivity and crashing dashboards during the first day of the new school year, held virtually at public schools across Broward County.

The issues frustrated parents who were hoping their children would have a smoother experience compared to the abrupt online transition in the spring at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Broward County Public Schools told the Miami Herald in an email that the issues some users experienced between 8:30 a.m. and 8:50 a.m. Wednesday were caused by an “unprecedented volume of users accessing our systems simultaneously to return to school.”

Korri Clementson, a mother of two, said her Driftwood Middle sixth grader and Sheridan Park kindergartner had trouble logging in and that neither of their dashboards would load.

“I know working parents are struggling with anxiety just as my husband and I are, trying to figure out how we balance trying to work and monitor our kids progress … Adding to it confusion, technical difficulties and disorganization doesn’t get anyone pumped up to keep a positive outlook on this situation,” Clementson said. “Broward pushed too soon today to start, and they weren’t ready.”

One parent sent an email to the Miami Herald describing the list of problems their third grade daughter was experiencing with Canvas, the district’s online learning platform. She kept getting kicked out, the screen would freeze and other features such as the “chat” box would not work.

“The teacher gave up. She said ‘none of the technology works. Let’s dance.’ … The teacher is now taking song requests,” the parent wrote.

But Plantation parent Kristen Hewitt says Wednesday morning was nothing like how it was back in March.

“Surprisingly, it was so much better than when the pandemic first hit,” said Hewitt, who has a third grader at Tropical Elementary and a sixth grader at Indian Ridge Middle. She said Wednesday was a departure from last spring, when only one of her children had virtual instruction, leaving her in charge of teaching and learning.

“For me it was like a breath of fresh air,” she said. “I was so relieved to have another adult teaching my kids because I’m not a good teacher.”

On Wednesday, Hewitt’s children logged on 20 minutes ahead of time and had no issues. It felt like as normal as a school day you can have during the pandemic, she said, with snack breaks and PE time on the swing set. She said her child’s art teacher couldn’t load the class.

“It’s the first day and you have all these kids on the server,” she said. “I don’t think anyone can expect it to go perfectly.”

Nova Blanche Forman Elementary School teacher Attiya Batool teaches her fourth grade class virtually as her son, Nabeel, does his second grade classwork online wearing a mask and headphones during the first day of school in Broward, Wednesday, August 19, 2020. All classes in Broward public schools are being taught remotely. The school district has made some adjustments where teachers may bring their child to their classroom to do remote learning while they teach.
Nova Blanche Forman Elementary School teacher Attiya Batool teaches her fourth grade class virtually as her son, Nabeel, does his second grade classwork online wearing a mask and headphones during the first day of school in Broward, Wednesday, August 19, 2020. All classes in Broward public schools are being taught remotely. The school district has made some adjustments where teachers may bring their child to their classroom to do remote learning while they teach.

Broward Superintendent Robert Runcie visited Nova Blanche Forman Elementary School in Davie at 8 a.m. to visit with teachers who were welcoming students by streaming live from their classrooms.

“Our teachers have worked so hard over this summer,” Runcie said. “They’ve trained themselves on utilizing tools and resources that are available to ensure that they are going to be effective, that they’re going to be able to engage their students.”

Teachers are permitted to teach in their classrooms, while streaming to their students at home. Broward Teachers Union president Anna Fusco said she did not know how many teachers opted to teach in schools.

She said she’s heard from teachers who, though overwhelmed and nervous yet excited, were also frustrated with the sporadic complications of logging on.

“Teachers just don’t want to be the ones that look like they didn’t know what they were doing,” said Fusco. “They planned, they did their courses, they understand how to use (Microsoft) Teams and understand how to turn on their video. But when the system is being handled by district level… the parents don’t get that.”

“I’m anticipating it’s not going to be the same old same old,” she said. “Just gotta get through the technical difficulties.”

Runcie acknowledged the computer issues.

“We know that some of them are going to have some challenges as we work through computer and tech problems that they may have,” Runcie said. “But I want to encourage every parent, every family, if you’re having any issues —our principals our administrators, our staff — they’re here at our schools. They’re here to take your calls.”

Fourth-grade teacher Julia Williams donned a tie-dyed T-shirt with the words, “Get your virtual teach on,” printed along with a face mask with an outer space pattern as she taught her class of 22 students via her computer. She said the goal of the first couple weeks of class is to build relationships with students virtually.

“This has been a learning curve for everybody,” Williams said. “You know that we are going to come through challenges now and two weeks from now and so we’ve been leaning on each other. My hope is that the parents and teachers can work together like no other this year.”

Third-grade teacher Skylar Billingsley spent her first morning back to school teaching her students commands on Zoom. The first lesson she wrote on the dry erase board behind her: turning mics off and virtually raising hands.

“Put your mic on mute for a second and I’m going to give you three seconds to do so,” Billingsley said to her students via webcam. “Mic on mute in three, two, one. Guys, I think I have the best class ever. What? You did that in three seconds, good job!”

Superintendent Runcie said while he wants students back in person as soon as possible, the safety and health of teachers and kids is the priority.

“We have chemistry, biology, physics, STEM and I believe that we need to pay attention to the science,” Runcie said. “We need to listen to our public health experts, our medical experts, which is what we do. And at the current time it isn’t safe for us to fully open our schools.”

“The moment we see the trend lines going in the right direction we will not hesitate for a moment to move forward to open our schools and get our kids back in our classrooms,” he said.

Catholic schools in Miami-Dade, Broward and Monroe run by the Archdiocese of Miami also began their school year fully online on Wednesday. Teachers in those schools were required to teach from their classrooms. Some schools asked students to wear their uniform shirt while on camera, and some schools gave out laptops to students.

“We’re trying to do whatever we can to make this feel like the child, the student is in the classroom,” said archdiocese spokeswoman Mary Ross Agosta. “It’s our intention…for the children to see their teacher in the classroom and be optimistic that this is only a temporary situation.”

Teacher Michaelle Joseph, left, gives books and iPads to Louna Dorcelien, right, at the Cathedral of St. Mary’s School on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 in Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood. Teacher Jeffrey Phillipe, center, waits to place the items in a bag. The supply distribution event was to help prepare students for the first day of online learning.
Teacher Michaelle Joseph, left, gives books and iPads to Louna Dorcelien, right, at the Cathedral of St. Mary’s School on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 in Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood. Teacher Jeffrey Phillipe, center, waits to place the items in a bag. The supply distribution event was to help prepare students for the first day of online learning.

Kelly Brandenburg moved her daughter from Tropical Elementary to Parkway Christian School for an in-person learning experience for second grade.

She said Tropical Elementary was high caliber, but online learning wasn’t ideal for her young daughter.

“We just struggled to maintain focus and my husband and I just felt like she was going to lose that period of time when they are online that she would just lose that learning opportunity,” Brandenburg said.

She said her daughter loves being back in school.

“The school is bubbling,” said Bradenburg. “You can just tell the kids are… just so excited to be back to seeing people and getting away from their parents a little bit.”

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