9 Reasons You Could Win a Scholarship for College

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If you’re hoping to help finance your college education with money you don’t have to pay back, you may be wondering how to win scholarships. There are many factors that go into getting scholarships or grants.

We’ll discuss nine reasons you might win a scholarship or grant and provide 12 tips to help you in your quest to secure these funds.

How to win scholarship or grants: 9 ways

1. Financial need 2. Academic achievement 3. Community service 4. Athletic accomplishments 5. Gender, ethnicity or sexual orientation 6. Parents’ place of employment 7. Being part of a military family 8. Unusual traits, skills or hobbies 9. Random

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China Vows Retaliation After U.S. Shutters Houston Consulate

(Bloomberg) — China vowed retaliation after the U.S. forced the closure of its Houston consulate, in one of the biggest threats to diplomatic ties between the countries in decades.

The U.S. government gave China three days to close its consulate in America’s fourth-most populous city in an “unprecedented escalation,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a regular briefing Wednesday in Beijing. China planned to “react with firm countermeasures” if the Trump administration didn’t “revoke this erroneous decision,” Wang said.

The U.S. State Department subsequently confirmed in a statement that it had ordered the consulate shut “to protect American intellectual property and Americans’ private information.” It said international agreements required diplomats to respect the laws and regulations of the host nation and not interfere in its internal affairs.

The first signs of trouble came when Houston police and firefighters descended on the consulate following witness reports that papers were being burned

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Central Florida schools push learning option that lets them can keep student funding

Central Florida public school districts are giving parents choices on how their children learn this fall, and many schools are pushing programs that would keep students in their home district.

The reason? Money. Public schools receive full funding for students who take classes on campus or through their own online learning model, but lose out on funds for kids enrolled in the Florida Virtual School — which could mean teacher layoffs.

Principals in Orange County have sent messages to parents through phone calls and social media posts expressing funding concerns and “highly recommending” the district’s new virtual program, OCPS [email protected], over the other virtual school option.

West Orange High School principal Matt Turner wrote in a newsletter to parents that he was “lobbying heavily” for families to pick on-campus learning if they’re comfortable or [email protected], which will have live, online lessons that follow a traditional school schedule.

“I just wanted

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This $3 billion online education company is seeing a ‘paradigm shift’ due to coronavirus

As more and more colleges weigh their options for adding online education in the fall, one online ed company is reaping the benefits of the shift away from lecture halls.

Industry leader 2U (TWOU) helps big name universities like Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and dozens of others offer educational programs online and as its CEO explained to Yahoo Finance Tuesday, business is booming.

“Over the last three months, we’ve spoken to more presidents and provosts than we had in our entire 12-year history,” CEO Chip Paucek told Yahoo Finance’s YFi PM. “So this is definitely a paradigm shift moment for online ed without question.”

As Paucek highlights, many colleges had been caught off guard when the coronavirus pandemic first hit back in March. Shifting to online classes for many meant little more than a Zoom video conference with a professor. With 2U’s tech, the company is offering the prospect

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Four tips for remote meetings

By Chris Taylor

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Jia Wertz may be a documentary filmmaker in New York City, but these days she feels like a full-time resident of Zoom world.

The director of the new documentary short “Conviction” finds herself on a video chat every single day, often multiple times, since the pandemic has upended all our lives. As a self-described introvert, she is having a hard time getting a handle on the new medium.

“With Zoom calls, you’re ‘on’ 100% of the time, which is so mentally draining,” says Wertz, who juggles a scampering two-year-old at the same time.

In this era of nonstop video-conferencing, you are not alone in feeling like you have just run a marathon or been hit by a truck. Many employees and managers are reporting that online video-conferences seem particularly taxing – often more so than in-person meetings.

“I’m an introvert, and they totally

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China Vows Retaliation After U.S. Shuts Down Houston Consulate

(Bloomberg) — China vowed retaliation after the U.S. forced the closure of its Houston consulate, prompting stocks to fall in one of the biggest blows to diplomatic ties between the two countries in decades.

The U.S. government gave China three days to close its consulate in America’s fourth-most populous city in an “unprecedented escalation,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a regular briefing Wednesday in Beijing. China planned to “react with firm countermeasures” if the Trump administration didn’t “revoke this erroneous decision,” Wang said.

The U.S. State Department subsequently confirmed in a statement that it had ordered the consulate closed “to protect American intellectual property and Americans’ private information.” It said international agreements required diplomats to respect the laws and regulations of the host nation and not interfere in its internal affairs.

The first signs of trouble came when Houston police and firefighters descended on the consulate following witness

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The ultimate guide to coverings as England’s rules change on Friday

We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock
We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that face masks and coverings will become part of daily life. The UK government and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have both advised wearing face coverings in a bid to reduce the infection transmission of Covid-19.

It was recently announced that from 24 July, face coverings will be mandatory in all shops and supermarkets in England. People who don’t wear one will face a fine of up to £100, apart from people with medical conditions and children under 11.

On 14 July health secretary, Matt Hancock, said: “We want to give people more confidence to shop safely and enhance protections for those who work in shops,” while noting the disproportionate impact that the pandemic has had on shop workers.

“The death rate

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‘We’re forced to choose between our livelihoods and our lives’

Designed to measure fitness, character and competence, the bar exam is a grueling 12-hour test typically administered over a two-day period to thousands of recent law school graduates.

But with coronavirus cases still surging in many parts of the nation, some law school graduates view this communal experience not as a shared rite of passage but as a potentially life-threatening risk.

One person worried about the uncertainties of the in-person bar exam is aspiring child protection lawyer Mollie McGuire of Chicago.

McGuire, along with Dalton Hughes and Steven Tinetti, formally filed a legal petition with the Illinois Supreme Court, asking the state’s highest court to grant 2020 law school graduates diploma privilege, meaning they could practice law without sitting for the bar exam. Nearly 1,400 law school graduates, faculty members, lawyers and health care workers signed on to support the effort.

In its response, the Illinois Board of Admissions to

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Daycares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his pre-school before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among millions of parents grappling with the pros and cons of sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage between politicians and school officials on fall re-opening plans, while New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care

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Mara Wilson on panic attacks and the perils of fame at an early age

“For most of my adult life I’ve wanted to try and convey this experience which I’ve never really seen presented the way I experienced it,” says director Alex Winter of Showbiz Kids, his new documentary chronicling the grey areas of childhood stardom.

Debuting on Sky Atlantic earlier this week, Winter – himself a former child star who shot to fame as time-travelling dude Bill alongside Keanu Reeves’ Ted in 1989’s Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure – delves deep into the glitzy early years of a host of stars to tell a soberingly down-to-earth story of youth and fame. Having previously helming documentaries like 2012’s Napster tale Downloaded and 2015’s illegal online trading expose Deep Web, it’s this latest project which features input from Westworld’s Evan Rachel Wood, E.T’s Henry Thomas and Matilda star Mara Wilson that marks Winter’s most personal – and powerful – work to

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