American Public University System Selects Dr. Wade Dyke as President

Former President of Kaplan University and CEO of Great Hearts Academies to Lead APUS Forward

Charles Town, WV, July 09, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — American Public University System (APUS), a leader in providing affordable, inclusive, quality online higher education to military, veteran and service-minded communities, announced today that it has selected Dr. Wade Dyke as president, effective August 12, 2020.

General Alfred M. Gray, USMC (Ret), Chairman of the APUS Board of Trustees and the 29th Commandant of the Marine Corps, said that Dr. Dyke is the clear choice to lead the university forward. “We have the strongest confidence in Wade’s ability to lead our organization as we move into a new era of learning innovation and growth,” said General Gray. “Dr. Dyke clearly understands the need to provide academic excellence to our adult learners and to foster student success and recognizes the immense value of our learning platform,

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A Q&A with Michael V. Drake

The University of California announced its new president, Dr. Michael V. Drake, on Tuesday. Drake, will oversee 10 campuses, five medical centers, three national laboratories and a nearly $40 billion operation.

History was made, as Drake is the first person of color to serve in this role. He replaces the current UC president, Janet Napolitano, who is stepping down after leading for seven years.

Drake is also taking the reins as the 21st president in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic as students and faculty transition to mostly online instruction for the fall. The university system’s 280,000 students and 227,000 employees face a hybrid set of plans for the fall. Most classes at UC Davis have moved online, but several courses are still being taught in-person.

Drake, who spent much of his childhood in Sacramento and graduated from C.K. McClatchy High School in 1967, spoke with The Sacramento Bee just

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College students on visas fret over ICE ruling that could force them out of US

When University of Southern California student Mage Zhang spent more than $5,000 for a flight home to China in late May, she packed all her belongings and thought this could be a trip of no return.

President Donald Trump administration’s new rule on international students confirmed her worries.

Issued by Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Monday, the new regulation says international students attending colleges in the U.S. cannot stay in the country if their classes are held fully online and not in a classroom.

In a provost letter to students on July 1, USC announced undergraduates will be “primarily or exclusively” taking classes online in the fall term. Zhang said she didn’t expect to return to campus before November.

“The risks and expenses are too high for a returning trip to the U.S., and I’d rather take online classes at home,” said Zhang, who will be a senior this year.

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School District Opts To Reopen Schools, Make Face Masks Mandatory

TAMPA, FL — The Hillsborough County superintendent of schools has announced that students and staff returning to public schools on Aug. 10 will be required to wear face masks.

After meeting with health officials, business leaders, teachers and school administrators, Superintendent Addison Davis said he believes masks are the best option at this time for keeping students and staff safe from the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

The district will provide three reusable face coverings for each student on the first day of school and three reusable face coverings for each staff member during back-to-school pre-planning.

“The CDC has identified face masks as one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” Davis said. “I believe face coverings is the best option we have for providing additional protection for everyone on our campuses.”

He said the county has already acquired 760,000 masks through purchases and donations.

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Colleges reel from new immigration announcement

When Nay, a senior at University of Illinois at Chicago, came to the U.S. from Bogor, Indonesia, in 2017, she thought she’d get the most out of her university experience — working, studying, and experiencing life in America.

Even with the coronavirus outbreak, she remained optimistic. But on Monday, new visa restrictions announced by the federal government left her worried.

“It’s very disheartening and very confusing,” Nay, who didn’t want to use her last name, told Yahoo Finance.

Visa guidelines for international students announced by the Trump administration have thrown the entire higher education industry — from students to university deans — into a tailspin. For colleges already scrambling to figure out how to safely open their campuses this fall amid a pandemic, the industry now worries about its future.

“I mean, I have to be honest, this one caught me much more by surprise,” Greg Siskind, an immigration lawyer

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