Outbreaks increase, pension spiking’s gotta go and 30 years of ADA

Outbreaks grow as California struggles to control the coronavirus. The state’s high court strikes down some types of pension spiking. And I talk to a longtime disability advocate about 30 years of ADA, inclusion in Hollywood and how COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting the community.

It’s Arlene and it’s Thursday. Let’s do this.

But first, state lawmakers and members of the public ripped into the Employment Development Department over late payments and how difficult it was to reach a human or get a response. One woman broke down while explaining she had been trying to get through since March 21, when her company shut down: “This is my life, my family’s life.”

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Calls grow to remove (and keep) noose logo, vacation rentals to exit and heat wave

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Become a better writer with lifetime access to this online course

Become a better writer with lifetime access to this online course
Become a better writer with lifetime access to this online course

TL;DR: The Writing With Impact course is on sale for £7.69 as of July 31, saving you 95% on list price.

Prolific writers make writing look easy, but it’s really not the case.

Between finding a unique, zippy opener to decoding a jumble of thoughts and emotions into clean, concise prose, the whole process can be grueling. Yes, even for professional writers. And when it comes to writing persuasively? Forget about it.

SEE ALSO: Build your business with help from these online classes

As a writing tutor at Cambridge University, Clare Lynch knows a thing or two about good writing and has developed an online course dedicated to making you a better writer. The Writing With Impact course features 5.5 hours of on-demand videos and 30 articles, and will teach you the nuts and bolts of persuasive writing.

Lynch

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COVID Hits USC Students And Faculty Hard As Virus Spreads To Younger Population

A coronavirus outbreak has hit USC’s fraternity row, where about 40 people tested positive for COVID-19, USC Student Health’s chief health officer Dr. Sarah Van Orman told the Los Angeles Times.

“A significant number of the cases were associated with four fraternity houses,” Van Orman said. The outbreak did not stop there, however.

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In all, about 150 Trojan students and employees have tested positive so far, even as the school has moved the vast majority of classes online, canceled events, limited on-campus housing, added mask requirements as well as social-distancing and symptom-checking measures.

“Unless all of us understand that right now our only tools are physical distancing and wearing masks, we’re going to continue to have devastation, not only in terms of the economy, our learning, our academics, our jobs, but people dying,” Van Orman said. “Each of us have to decide what we stand for. Frats

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Amazon vows to invest $10B in Kuiper satellites after getting FCC’s go-ahead

The Federal Communications Commission has authorized Amazon’s plans for a Project Kuiper constellation of 3,236 satellites that would provide broadband internet access across a wide swath of the globe — but on the condition that it doesn’t unduly interfere with previously authorized satellite ventures.

In response, Amazon said it would invest more than $10 billion in the project. “We’re off to the races,” Dave Limp, Amazon’s senior vice president of devices and services, said in a statement. (We’re passing along the full statement below.)

The FCC’s non-interference requirements and other conditions are laid out in a 24-page order that was adopted on Wednesday and released today. The ruling addresses objections registered by Amazon’s rivals — including SpaceX, OneWeb and Telesat.

Project Kuiper’s satellites are to be launched in five phases, and service would begin once Amazon launched the first 578 satellites. Under the terms of the FCC’s order, Amazon will

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Big Tech Emperors Parade Their Earnings Power

(Bloomberg Opinion) — What timing. On Wednesday, the CEOs of four of the biggest U.S. technology companies downplayed the market power of their respective firms in a landmark antitrust hearing before a House subcommittee. Then just a day later, the same companies posted blowout earnings that demonstrated why they are the envy of world — and the target of scrutiny.

Late Thursday, Apple Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Google parent Alphabet Inc. all reported better-than-expected financial results, with each generating billions of dollars in earnings for the June quarter. The numbers showed the resilience of their respective businesses, illustrating how these behemoths can generate large profit pools amid a pandemic. The four companies’ stocks spiked higher in after-hours trading, adding to their healthy gains this year.Apple made the most money out of the bunch, posting a net profit of $11.3 billion and generating $59.7 billion in revenue for its

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expert generalists are more likely to be successful in the future

A lot has changed in the last six months — uncertainty is the new normal. Change is nothing new but the recent development is massive.

The year 2020 will go down in history as the year that changed established systems, beliefs and conventional wisdom in all areas of life.

We are going through a historic transition — if you don’t adapt fast, you may be left behind. With the current global transformation, remote work-styles, and the uncertainty about work, the future will allow for (and incentivize) multiple career bets.

The rapidly evolving world requires us to drop conventional mindsets, let go of old rules of work, learn new skills fast and develop new habits that can help us thrive in the new world of work.

Our working lives will be different for a long time — you don’t have to miss out on anything: you can adapt, reinvent yourself and

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‘America was built by John Lewises’

Powerful tributes to a civil rights icon. Alarming long-term effects of COVID-19. And yes, Election Day is still Nov. 3. 

It’s Ashley. Let’s talk news. 

But first, these birds are making people quite emu-tional: An Australian pub has banned emus — yes, the flightless bird — for “bad behavior.” Two of the birds, Carol and Kevin, apparently wreaked particular havoc when they figured out they could climb stairs last week. 

The Short List newsletter is a snappy USA TODAY news roundup. Subscribe here!

An ‘unbreakable’ man: Former presidents hail John Lewis 

In a remarkable nod of respect from the highest level of government, Barack Obama called Rep. John Lewis “a man of pure joy and unbreakable perseverance” in joining George W. Bush and Bill Clinton in a rare gathering of former presidents to honor Lewis, a civil rights giant, at his funeral in a church where Dr. Martin Luther

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FCC says Amazon can proceed with Kuiper satellites but will have to work with rivals

The Federal Communications Commission has authorized Amazon’s plans for a Project Kuiper constellation of 3,236 satellites that would provide broadband internet access across a wide swath of the globe — but on the condition that it doesn’t unduly interfere with previously authorized satellite ventures.

The non-interference requirements and other conditions are laid out in a 24-page order that was adopted on Wednesday and released today. The ruling addresses objections registered by Amazon’s rivals — including SpaceX, OneWeb and Telesat.

The FCC said Project Kuiper’s satellites are to be launched in five phases, and service would begin once Amazon launched the first 578 satellites. Under the terms of the order, Amazon will have to launch half of its satellites by mid-2026, and the rest of them by mid-2029.

Amazon had sought to vie on an equal footing with constellation operators whose plans had been previously authorized by the FCC, but the

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Stock futures jump after Big Tech reports blowout earnings

Stock futures rose Thursday evening, with contracts on the Nasdaq jumping more than 100 points, or 1%, after a slew of better than expected corporate earnings results from major tech firms.

After market close, tech titans Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), each reported quarterly results that blew past estimates, affirming these companies’ pandemic-era dominance following a steep run-up in tech stocks over the past couple months.

Facebook grew its revenue 11% over last year as its advertising business remained resilient despite the pandemic-related slowdown across the broader ad industry. Alphabet’s ad business was hit more prominently by that trend, with Google ad revenue falling 8% over last year, though Alphabet’s overall top- and bottom-line results still topped estimates. Facebook’s daily active users jumped 13% to 1.79 billion and monthly active users rose 12% to 2.7% billion as the pandemic drove online engagement, though the company

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How to Earn Money Online

The jobs available for people looking to make money online run the gamut. On the internet, you can seek everything from full-time employment as a remote staff member to a work-whenever-you-want side hustle as a blogger or jewelry-maker.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has rattled the job market, online hiring is strong in a range of industries. According to Glassdoor’s Job Market Report, there were 11,430 remote job openings in July on Glassdoor, up 28.3% from the year before.

“The fields with the most remote-work listings right now include areas like customer service, sales, computer and (information technology), medical and health, and education and training,” wrote Brie Weiler Reynolds, career development manager and coach at FlexJobs, a resource for finding remote jobs, part-time jobs, freelance jobs and other flexible jobs, in an email.

These are industries where work has moved away from in-person to online interactions, she notes.

Other fields with

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