Carnival Corp. will not make full return until 2022

Cruise giant Carnival Corp. is continuing plans for a phased-in approach for its return to sailing, beginning with fewer ships and fewer passengers, on a region-by-region basis. The company will not make a full return in terms of passenger capacity until 2022 at the earliest, according to CEO Arnold Donald.

 “[The] nature of restart is going to be almost country by country and destination by destination,” Donald said on an earnings call Friday, 120 days after the company paused operations due to coronavirus. 

Carnival Corp.’s restart will mimic international reopenings.

The resumption of shoreside social gathering practices will be the “critical thing” as an indicator for the resumption of cruising. He pointed to Germany, where one Carnival subsidiary, AIDA Cruises will resume sailing three of its ships in August after the country began to reopen in the spring. Italy, he suggested, might be next. 

AIDA’s three scheduled cruises will not

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Janet Hayes Named Crate & Barrel CEO, Kit Kemp Partners with Christie’s London, and More News This Week

From significant business changes to noteworthy product launches, there’s always something new happening in the world of design. In this weekly roundup, AD PRO has everything you need to know.

Business

A Big Week for Big Retailers

It was a busy news week for major home furnishings retailers. After reporting last week that Neela Montgomery would step down as CEO, Crate and Barrel announced that Janet Hayes would assume the role on August 1. The president of Williams-Sonoma from 2013 to 2019, Hayes was also formerly the president of Pottery Barn Kids and Pottery Barn Teen.

Elsewhere, Sur La Table filed for bankruptcy. The Seattle-based purveyor of kitchen goods disclosed its plans to close 56 of its 112 stores; 20% of its corporate staff was also cut.

West Elm made waves when it announced that it would take the 15 Percent Pledge, which means that partnerships with Black designers and

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Is she latest victim of ‘curse’ of beloved TV musical series ‘Glee’?

If you believe in curses then you’ve got to be wondering if there’s a hex on the beloved TV musical series “Glee,” staggered over the years by untimely deaths of its cast and crew. Now comes the latest tragedy: the presumed drowning of Naya Rivera.

Investigators continued their search and recovery efforts for Rivera, 33, best known as the snarky Santana Lopez on the show, Thursday at a reservoir 60 miles northwest of Los Angeles in the Los Padres National Forest by the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office.

Rivera disappeared in the waters of Lake Piru on Wednesday after she and her 4-year-old son, Josey Dorsey, rented a pontoon boat at the popular recreational destination, said Capt. Eric Buschow, a spokesman for the sheriff’s office. Authorities also said Rivera had been to the lake in the past.

Naya Rivera and son Josey Hollis Dorsey at the premiere of “The Lego Movie

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Here’s how to manage your remote worker’s device security

One of the biggest consequences of COVID-19 for enterprises beyond 2020 will be the acceleration of the trend to working the majority of the working week from home.

Already organizations were encouraged to look into it on the promise that each employee working from home would, on average, work an additional 1.4 days per month, and that there would be greater productivity due to a perceived improvement in work/life balance.

This working from home percentage was increased in an accelerated fashion due to the COVID-19 situation. With lockdown effectively mandating that most people in professional careers work from home, as we return to ‘normal’ it is likely that the dominant trend going forward will be that employees will want to continue working from home into the future. Indeed, research suggests that as much as 41 percent of employees will continue to work from home to at least some extent following

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With new name and album, The Chicks’ voices ring loud again

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Dixie Chicks are no more. Breaking their ties to the South, The Chicks are stepping into a new chapter in their storied career with their first new music in 14 years.

The Texas trio of Emily Strayer, Martie Maguire and Natalie Maines have been teasing new music for a year, and “Gaslighter” finally drops on July 17 when the nation is embroiled in divisive politics, cancel culture and reckoning with inequality. The timing is right for their voices to be heard again.

“It just seemed like a good reflection on our times,” said Maines. “In 20 years, we’ll look back at that album cover and title and remember exactly what was going on in the country right then.”

“Gaslighter” is a slang term, inspired by a 1944 Ingrid Bergman film, to describe a psychological abuser who manipulates the truth to make a person feel crazy.

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Former Michigan GOP party leader flips sides. Now he’s working to defeat Trump

Jeff Timmer used to be a key Republican operative in Michigan, the state party’s executive director, the smart guy who helped draw legislative and congressional districts that still make Democrats crazy. He spent three decades linked to a party fighting for abortion controls, limited government, free-market policies.

But he couldn’t bring himself to support Donald Trump in 2016.

Four years after he and 75,000 other Michiganders sat on the sidelines in that election, Timmer is back, though not so much as a Republican: On Twitter, he excoriates Trump and mocks him and the president’s allies in the starkest of terms. As an adviser to the Lincoln Project — a group of former Republican consultants from across the U.S. who want to defeat Trump and elect Joe Biden — he is part of what has been one of the most trenchant and recognizable opposition brands in the 2020 campaign.

Jeff Timmer.
Jeff Timmer.
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17 actually fun websites to learn something new

17 actually fun websites to learn something new
17 actually fun websites to learn something new

The pandemic has relegated millions of people to their homes, with not much to do but stare at various screens.

There’s the bad screen, otherwise known as the work or school screen. Then there’s the good screen, or the thing you stare at in your free time to watch TV, play video games, or mindlessly scroll through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media.

But perhaps, after roughly four months of quarantine, it’s time to introduce something akin to a useful screen. We’ve got free time — not really by choice, but still — so maybe you want to make the best of it. It might just be the perfect time to learn a new skill, practice a language, or any number of other useful things.

That in mind, 7 sites to learn something new that can help you learn a

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How a Career Pivot Can Help You Pursue Your Passion

Photo credit: Westend61 - Getty Images
Photo credit: Westend61 – Getty Images

From Redbook

There’s no question that the coronavirus had a lasting impact on life as we knew it. For most people, an unexpected layoff added stress to an already uncertain reality. In April, the news was bleak. The Labor Department reported that the coronavirus shutdown led to more than 20 million job losses. But the path to recovery has begun. Recent statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show that the unemployment rate fell to 13.3 percent—and there were even 2.5 million jobs regained.

Kellee Marlow, a career coach pivot strategist, highlights why this is the right time to search for something fulfilling. “The pandemic is pushing people to ask themselves what kind of life they want to live, especially when it’s over,” she says. “Life may not have slowed down enough before to give people a chance to ask what they’re doing and

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Framingham Schools, Health Board To Discuss Fall Reopening

FRAMINGHAM, MA — The Framingham School Committee and the Board of Health will meet on July 15 to begin talks on how to safely reopen schools this fall with coronavirus still lurking in Massachusetts.

The state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) on June 25 released a long-awaited plan for sending students back to school amid the coronavirus pandemic. But the plan is only advisory, with DESE leaving school districts across the state to create individualized reopening plans.

DESE is asking each district by August to submit three plans for reopening: one for a complete return to in-person learning; a second for a hybrid of in-person and remote learning; and a 100 percent remote learning plan.

But districts across the state are cautious about a full return to school due lingering questions about coronavirus — like how it spreads among young people, and how quickly a vaccine will be

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Coronavirus’s painful side effect is deep budget cuts for state and local government services

<span class="caption">Washington state cut both merit raises and instituted furloughs as it faced a projected $8.8 billion budget deficit because of the coronavirus.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/washington-state-olympia-state-capitol-building-with-spring-news-photo/452908636?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images">Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images</a></span>
Washington state cut both merit raises and instituted furloughs as it faced a projected $8.8 billion budget deficit because of the coronavirus. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Nationwide, state and local government leaders are warning of major budget cuts as a result of the pandemic. One state – New York – even referred to the magnitude of its cuts as having “no precedent in modern times.”

Declining revenue combined with unexpected expenditures and requirements to balance budgets means state and local governments need to cut spending and possibly raise taxes or dip into reserve funds to cover the hundreds of billions of dollars lost by state and local government over the next two to three years because of the pandemic.

Without more federal aid or access to other sources of money (like reserve funds or borrowing), government officials have made it clear: Budget cuts will be happening in the coming

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