angry

The science behind why everyone is angry on Twitter on Mondays

The link between hot weather and aggressive crime is well established. But can the same be said for online aggression, such as angry tweets? And is online anger a predictor of assaults?

Our study just published suggests the answer is a clear “no.” We found angry tweet counts actually increased in cooler weather. And as daily maximum temperatures rose, angry tweet counts decreased.

We also found the incidence of angry tweets is highest on Mondays, and perhaps unsurprisingly, angry Twitter posts are most prevalent after big news events such as a leadership spill.

This is the first study to compare patterns of assault and social media anger with temperature. Given anger spreads through online communities faster than any other emotion, the findings have broad implications – especially under climate change.

[Read: Twitter wants to let you react with emoji — but why?]

A caricature of US President Donald Trump, who’s been known to fire off an angry tweet. Shutterstock
A caricature of US President Donald Trump, who’s
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