animal

Scientists ‘Digitally Unwrap’ Ancient Egyptian Animal Mummies | Smart News

For some 2,000 years, a collection of mummified animals have been preserved, with details about their life and death hidden under layers of muslin. Now, researchers have found a way to digitally peel back the layers and “dissect” the animal underneath using a high resolution scanner.

Researchers studied three animals—a cat, a bird and a snake—in a seven-year collaborative project by Swansea University’s College of Engineering and the University’s Egypt Centre.

The team used a detailed scanning process called micro-computerized tomography (CT) to better understand how the animals were mummified, conditions in which they were kept, possible causes of death and the handling damage mummies sustained. The findings were published yesterday in the journal Scientific Reports.

“This paper pushed resolution and analysis to its limits, revealing more than could be determined through lower-resolution methods or even through real-life unwrapping,” Richard Johnston of Swansea University, who led the research, tells Matt

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The pandemic highlights the gruesome animal abuses at US factory farms

<span>Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images</span>
Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

More than any event in recent history, the coronavirus pandemic has made plain the consequences of our abuse of animals. From the Chinese wet market where the virus likely emerged to the American slaughterhouses which have become key vectors of transmission, our ravenous demand for cheap meat has been implicated in enormous human suffering. But the suffering is not ours alone. The pandemic has also focused our attention on how American agribusiness – which has benefited from deregulation under the Trump administration – abuses animals on an industrial scale.

Related: US nears 150,000 Covid-19 deaths as Republicans and Democrats pitch opposing plans – live

As slaughterhouses across the nation have been forced to close by the virus, gruesome stories have emerged of the mass killing of millions of chickens and pigs who can no longer be brought to market. Chickens have been gassed or smothered

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The availability of ‘animal crush’ content has created a cat-and-mouse subculture of attention-seeking animal abusers and the web sleuths who suss them out

Those who make animal torture videos can escalate from bugs, to mice, and then eventually larger domesticated pets, experts say.
Those who make animal torture videos can escalate from bugs, to mice, and then eventually larger domesticated pets, experts say.

Universal Images Group via Getty Images

  • “Animal crush” videos are an extreme version of violent porn shared online where animals are filmed being tortured and killed.

  • These graphic videos break animal cruelty laws, as well as federal “animal crush” distribution statutes.

  • Animal crush videos are nothing new, but a recent case involving an Indiana woman peaked an web sleuth movement where animal advocates around the world worked long hours to track her down. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Editor’s Note: This story contains graphic details about animal abuse and cruelty.

Lisa Kauffman is no stranger to animal abuse.

As the Idaho and Wyoming state director for the Humane Society of the United States, she’s gone into homes where cats and dogs were beaten, neglected, and emaciated. She’s walked past

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The FBI says that most serial killers and school shooters abused animals before they murdered people. In the internet age, that animal torture has found a devoted audience online.

Usually animal crush videos feature bugs or mice.
Usually animal crush videos feature bugs or mice.

Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

  • People around the world — including in the US — are making “animal crush” videos, an extreme version of torture porn in which animals are tortured and killed on video.

  • The making and distribution of these videos are illegal, and mostly exist on the dark web, but some slip through detection efforts on mainstream social media platforms.

  • Experts say that the people who make these videos have the characteristics of a budding serial killer. 

  • Those who watch them might get sexual pleasure out of pain. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Editor’s Note: This story contains graphic details about animal abuse and cruelty.

Many “animal crush” videos will start the same. 

A person whose identity is masked will hold up an animal, like a cat or dog, and pet them affectionately. 

An audience will get a chance to see

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