Black

Black parents see college degree as a key to success

Dear Reader,

I probably would have never gone to college had I not spent two months of my childhood in a hospital.

While in middle school, I was diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The pain in my legs became so bad that I couldn’t walk. My grandmother, “Big Mama,” a nursing assistant who raised me from the time I was 4, couldn’t afford to miss work to take me to the daily physical therapy appointments I needed to walk without pain. So I stayed at the hospital. I cried a lot over the isolation from my grandmother and my two brothers and two sisters, whom she also was raising.

Sincerely, Michelle In a 10-part series, Michelle Singletary gets personal about common misconceptions involving race and inequality.

The director of the physical therapy department, a Black licensed therapist, saw how lonely I was and adopted me as her goddaughter. After my

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The lack of Black leaders in New England college sports is ‘what institutional and systemic racism look like’

“It amazes me that these barriers have not been broken down by now,” Titus said. “It’s a prime example of what institutional and systemic racism look like.”

A Globe survey of 112 colleges and universities in New England found that only five, or 4.5 percent, employ a Black athletic director. Just one of the region’s 15 Division 1 athletic departments has a Black leader: Marcus Blossom at Holy Cross.

“It amazes me that these barriers have not been broken down by now. It’s a prime example of what institutional and systemic racism look like.”

On Aug. 17, Division 2 Bentley University named Vaughn Williams, a senior administrator at Boston College, as its first Black AD. The other Black athletic directors in New England manage lower-budget operations at Division 3 schools: Anthony Grant at MIT, Lauren Haynie at Brandeis, and Darlene Gordon, Titus’s interim replacement at UMass Boston.

The diversity deficit

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10 Films and Panels to Watch at the 2020 Edition of the ‘Black Sundance’

BlackStar Film Festival has become a significant annual event celebrating the visual and storytelling traditions of not only the African diaspora, but also of global communities of color as well. With a lineup primarily composed of short films and feature-length debuts, the nine-year-old festival is also a major window into emerging talent, and this year is no different.” data-reactid=”19″Dubbed by members of its community as “the Black Sundance,” the BlackStar Film Festival has become a significant annual event celebrating the visual and storytelling traditions of not only the African diaspora, but also of global communities of color as well. With a lineup primarily composed of short films and feature-length debuts, the nine-year-old festival is also a major window into emerging talent, and this year is no different.

Typically held in Philadelphia, the week-long program (running August 20 through 26) will take place entirely online this year, as has been

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‘I come from a Black and Jewish family’

Nick Cannon learned he comes from a Jewish family after making anti-Semitic comments. (Fabrizio Benschz/Reuters)
Nick Cannon learned he comes from a Jewish family after making anti-Semitic comments. (Fabrizio Benschz/Reuters)

Nick Cannon wants to atone for making anti-Semitic comments. The Masked Singer host, 39, appeared on the American Jewish Committee’s online program AJC Advocacy Anywhere for a candid conversation with Rabbi Noam Marans. Cannon and Marans, AJC’s director of interreligious and intergroup relations, have been meeting in recent weeks so the comedian can better understand the impact of his “hurtful words.”

“I must first say, I’m sorry,” Cannon said at the beginning of the hourlong conversation on Monday. He compared the situation he’s found himself in to when his kids, whom he shares with Mariah Carey, go outside “and throw rocks.”

“When a rock hits someone, the first thing you do is say ‘I apologize’ … and then we’ll deal with why you were throwing rocks,” Cannon explained. “My words hurt people.”

The comedian apologized

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‘He better pick a Black woman’: Biden faces Whitmer backlash

Anticipation has been growing for weeks that Joe Biden will make history by choosing the first Black woman as a running mate on a major party’s presidential ticket.

But after news broke over the weekend that Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a white woman, had flown to meet with Biden to discuss the vice presidency, frustration and disappointment boiled over among Black female Democrats — including some in her own state.

“He better pick a black woman. If he picks Gretchen, he’ll lose Michigan,” said Virgie Rollins, chair of the Democratic National Committee Black Caucus, who hosted Biden at her home before his Michigan primary win this spring.

“There are a lot of Black people mad at her [Whitmer] in this state,” Rollins told POLITICO, citing her record on Flint’s lead water crisis and education policy, particularly in Detroit.

As Biden prepares to announce his choice this week, Black women activists

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Black male leaders say Biden will lose election if he doesn’t choose Black woman as VP

WASHINGTON – More than 100 Black male leaders, including activists, preachers, rappers and celebrities, in an open letter Monday called on Joe Biden to pick a Black woman as his running mate, saying that if he does not, he will lose the election.

“As someone who has said throughout the campaign that VP Joe Biden needs to choose a Black woman VP, the urgency for that pick has gone from something that SHOULD happen to something that HAS to happen,” the open letter said, which was published the week that Biden is expected to announce his running mate.

The letter was created in solidarity with an April letter signed by more than 700 black women leaders – including pastors, doctors, lawyers and celebrities – calling on Biden to “recognize and seize this moment” by picking a black woman as his running mate.

Rapper Sean “Diddy” Combs, radio host Lenard “Charlamagne

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They tweeted, retweeted photo of a cop at a Black Lives Matter protest. Then came felonies.

NUTLEY, N.J. – It began with a tweet of a police officer at a Black Lives Matter protest in June and a crude request to identify him.

“If anyone knows who this b—h is, throw his info under this tweet,” the tweet read.

Sitting home in Queens Village, New York, Georgana Sziszak saw the tweet appear on her Twitter timeline and clicked the “retweet” button. 

Nearly one month later, Sziszak was issued a summons charging her with a felony: fourth-degree cyber harassment with the intent to harm or place a person in fear of harm, after retweeting the post, which has since been deleted.

“As a 20-year-old that simply retweeted a tweet to help my friend, I am now at risk of giving up my career, serving time and having a record,” Sziszak wrote on a GoFundMe page, which has raised more than $8,000 for her legal bills.

Unemployment: 1.8M

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Misty Copeland Says the Black Community Has Never Felt Like Ballet “Was Their World”

Misty Copeland became the first Black principal dancer for American Ballet Theatre in 2015, and through her professional career that has spanned two decades, she’s been fighting for change. “Initially, I got into ballet because it’s a silent art form,” she said on Yahoo Finance’s Influencers with Andy Serwer. “I didn’t want to speak, I wanted to express myself through movement.” The first decade of her career, she was the only Black woman in American Ballet Theatre, and she described feeling a sense of panic where she questioned if she was ever going to see another Black woman in her company or in her lifetime, even.

This realization prompted Copeland to start using her voice when it came to the racial insensitivity and inequality in the ballet world, with the hopes that she could make change for generations to come. “Black ballet dancers, our histories are so often just

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Black scientists, physicians are using hashtags to uplift

Black scientists are embracing the hashtag movement that forced the nation to take a hard look at systemic racism.

As #BlackLivesMatter remains a rallying cry across the country, Black researchers and physicians are using tags including #BlackBirdersWeek, #BlackInAstro, #BlackInNeuro and #BlackInChem to lift up the achievements of their peers and call out the discrimination they face on a daily basis.

Racism has long been an issue in academia. Black scientists report high rates of both subtle and overt forms of workplace discrimination and, according to a 2019 study, are less likely than their white peers to receive funding for their research. Research published in April via the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that underrepresented groups are innovative at a higher rate than their majority peers but their achievements are often overlooked.

So Black birders, astronomers, botanists, physicians and neuroscientists, many of them women, have taken to Twitter

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Gizelle Bryant on Reconciling With Her Ex and Bringing Black Excellence to TV (Exclusive)

Gizelle Bryant doesn’t care what you think about her. She does care what you think about Black women, though.

“We can all see what’s going on with Black Lives Matter and the change in the culture that Black women are viewed a certain way, and I never want to be in a situation — as far as this platform is concerned — and viewed in a way that is animalistic or violent,” the Real Housewives of Potomac star tells ET over video chat.

It’s a conversation that winds up at the center of RHOP’s fifth season, after cast members Monique Samuels and Candiace Dillard get into a physical altercation, reportedly initiated by Monique. It’s the first time in five years that a physical line like that has been crossed on Potomac.

“What happened was nothing we ever thought we would see on this show or on this platform,”

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