businesses

Businesses turn to tech as they reopen

When employees at the 3D bioprinting company Cellink went back to the office Monday after nearly five months, they were required to clip a small piece of Bluetooth technology onto their clothes before walking through the office’s front doors.

The devices, made by the Austrian company Safedi, are intended to make sure people are socially distancing in the office. A green light shines when people are at least six feet apart.

A red light flashes and the device emits a noise when people get too close.

“Safedi has already shown its value in just one day, especially when it’s time for those coffee breaks,” Cellink CEO Erik Gatenholm said.

The devices are one example of the varied and sometimes bizarre tech-infused solutions businesses are using in an effort to get their employees back to work and offer their customers a safe environment amid the ongoing outbreaks of the coronavirus in

Read More

356,000 Californians infected, shutdowns ravage local businesses

It was another troubling week in California, as growing infections and hospitalizations prompted state and local officials to announce new widespread closures of businesses and schools across the state to slow the coronavirus pandemic.

The pandemic, which is disproportionately ravaging communities of color, has killed at least 7,345 Californians. This week alone, more than 35,000 Californians were reported to have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to state data released Thursday morning, bringing the total number of infections in the state to about 356,000.

Nearly 6,800 Californians with the virus are currently in a hospital bed, according to the state. About 28 percent of hospitalized patients are in intensive care. There were nine fewer COVID-19 patients in hospital beds on Wednesday compared to the previous day.

“This continues to be a deadly disease,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said during his noon press conference Monday. “This continues to be a disease

Read More

COVID-19 turned college towns into ghost towns and businesses are struggling to survive

AMHERST, Mass. — For more than a century, the office supply store A.J. Hastings has opened its doors to the public every day without fail, a community staple in a quintessential college town.

That streak endured through the 1918 flu and world wars, national holidays and even a move. “Through thick and thin,” said Sharon Povinelli, who co-owns the store with her wife, Mary Broll.

Located in the heart of Amherst, the store has been a mainstay for students at Amherst College and Hampshire College, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts.

“We’ve been here almost as long as the universities here,” Povinelli said.

The third-generation-owned business never broke its opening streak — until the coronavirus pandemic hit. A.J. Hastings, along with millions of other businesses across the country, closed in March to curb the spread of COVID-19, while colleges shut down their campuses and turned to remote

Read More

10 women-owned small businesses to support right now

As the economy attempts to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the best ways we can help entrepreneurs stay afloat is by shopping small. This week, the 3rd Hour of TODAY is highlighting women-owned small businesses to consider supporting.

As part of the “She Made It” series, we’ll be featuring some of our favorite brands in fashion, food, beauty and beyond.

Read on for the small brands you should have on your radar right now.

1. Olive & June

While stay-at-home orders were in full force, DIY nail maintenance became a necessity, and Olive & June was perfectly positioned to help customers achieve their at-home manicure goals.

Founded by former equity sales trader Sarah Gibson Tuttle, the business started out as a salon in the Los Angeles area but quickly developed a following for its curated manicure kits and innovative tools to make painting your own nails a little

Read More