Carolina

University of North Carolina shuts down athletic programs through Thursday afternoon after COVID-19 spike

Just 48 hours after saying a COVID-19 outbreak on campus wouldn’t affect plans to play football this fall, the University of North Carolina has suspended all athletic activities through at least Thursday afternoon.

Medical expert questions motives of college football decision-makers

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In addition, all recreational facilities on the Chapel Hill campus will be closed to students, coaches and staff.

“After consulting with our health experts and University leadership, we are taking this action to protect our students, coaches and staff,” UNC athletics director Bubba Cunningham said. “We want to make sure we continue to do everything we can to ensure that that our teams, campus and community remain healthy.”



a close up of a helmet on top of a grass covered field: A North Carolina helmet is shown on the field prior to an NCAA college football game against Georgia Tech in Chapel Hill, N.C., Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014.


© Gerry Broome, AP
A North Carolina helmet is shown on the field prior to an NCAA college football game against Georgia Tech in Chapel Hill, N.C., Saturday, Oct. 18, 2014.

From NFL plays to college

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University of North Carolina temporarily suspends fall sports; Pope warns against the rich getting vaccine first

Florida, one of the hardest hit states from the coronavirus, just registered its 10,000th death due to COVID-19. 

It came after the state recorded 174 new deaths Wednesday, giving it a total that’s fifth highest among states around the country. It has recorded more than 584,000 cases of COVID-19 so far.

The virus, meanwhile, continues to play havoc with colleges’ attempts to reopen classes.

A day after officials at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill decided to pivot to online classes after at least four clusters of outbreaks in student living spaces, North Carolina State University reported its first cluster of positive cases in off-campus housing. Also Tuesday, the University of Notre Dame said it was moving to online classes for two weeks in hopes that infections won’t surge.

And sports fans who thought they could get a break from the coronavirus fallout can’t catch a break: new NFL

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North Carolina State University reports first cluster of cases; Hawaii delays tourism reopening; global cases top 22M

First, the University of North Carolina. Now, North Carolina State University.

A day after university officials in Chapel Hill decided to pivot to online classes after at least four clusters of outbreaks of COVID-19 in student living spaces, the Raleigh university reported its first cluster of positive cases that included some of its own students.

Also Tuesday, the University of Notre Dame said it was moving to online classes for two weeks in hopes that infections won’t surge.

Meanwhile, a new survey shows that parents with children who have switched to online learning say they have gone into debt paying for all of the at-home school expenses, including breakfast and lunch, during the pandemic.

Some significant developments:

  • The U.S. stock market closed at an all-time high Tuesday, staging a stunning turnaround from the darkest early days of the coronavirus pandemic.

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced he is writing a

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Reparations for Black people in this North Carolina city could be coming. Here’s how

Six years ago, North Carolina set aside $10 million in reparations to compensate victims of a state eugenics program that forcibly sterilized more than 7,000 people well into the 1970s — many of whom were Black.

Now one city is weighing a different set of reparations.

Asheville City Council in western North Carolina is set to vote on a resolution next week that supports community reparations for Black residents, according to an agenda for the July 14 meeting published online.

“Black People have been unjustly enslaved,” the resolution states.

The city of Asheville “apologizes and makes amends for its participation in and sanctioning of the enslavement of Black people,” “for its enforcement of segregation and its accompanying discriminatory practices” and “for carrying out an urban renewal program that destroyed multiple, successful Black communities,” it continues.

The Memorial Day death of 46-year-old George Floyd, a Black man, while in police custody

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