China

China teenage climate warrior fights a lonely battle

While most of her peers are preparing for university or enjoying summer vacation, 17-year-old Howey Ou is braving intimidation and criticism in China to save the world from climate catastrophe.

Young environmental activists around the world have skipped school to attend marches in protest at global inaction over climate change.

But in China, grassroots social movements are heavily suppressed by the government, and the movement is severely lacking in participants.

It has changed Ou’s life though. She was inspired by Swedish teenage climate campaigner Greta Thunberg, and held her own week-long solo protest in May last year outside her local government buildings, gaining international recognition.

“The climate emergency is the biggest threat to the survival of mankind. I feel anxious every day about the climate and the extinction of animal species,” said Ou, an intense figure who speaks in a fast monotone, reeling off a trove of scientific data from

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the former Hong Kong teen activist China wants to silence

Arrested for alleged national security crimes, Agnes Chow hails from a generation of Hong Kong democracy activists who cut their teeth in politics as teenagers and are now being steadily silenced by China.

The media cameras flashed incessantly as the 23-year-old was led handcuffed from her apartment on Monday evening by police officers with Hong Kong’s new national security unit.

She is one of the first opposition politicians to be arrested under Beijing’s new security law — on a charge of “colluding with foreign forces” — and could face up to life in jail if convicted.

For Chow, Monday’s arrest was the latest in a long line of confrontations with China’s authoritarian leaders and their Hong Kong proxies.

Chow has described growing up in an apolitical Catholic household.

But at the age of 15 she joined a youth-led movement protesting against plans to implement “moral and national education” in public

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Beluga whales transported from captivity in China to ocean refuge

The two Beluga whales, named Little Grey and Little White, were moved to the world's first open-water whale sanctuary after travelling 6,000 miles from an aquarium in China. (PA)
The two Beluga whales, named Little Grey and Little White, were moved to the world’s first open-water whale sanctuary after travelling 6,000 miles from an aquarium in China. (PA)

Two 12-year-old beluga whales have been transported to a sanctuary in Iceland after a decade in a Chinese aquarium where they performed as show animals.

The whales, called Little Grey and Little White, made the 6,000-mile journey from Shanghai, beginning in June last year, thanks to UK charity the Sea Life Trust.

They are now in a care area of the world’s first open-water sanctuary for belugas in Klettsvik Bay off the south coast of Iceland.

They will need time to acclimatise to their new natural environment before their final release into the wider sanctuary.

Images show the distinctive animals, which weigh around 1,200kg each, being taken into the refuge by a team using special tight harnesses.

The relocation took 12

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Trump moves on China apps may create new internet ‘firewall’

A ban by President Donald Trump’s administration on Chinese mobile apps such as TikTok and WeChat risks fragmenting an already fragile global internet and creating an American version of China’s “Great Firewall.”

Fears about the global internet ecosystem intensified this week with Trump’s executive orders banning the popular video app TikTok and Chinese social network WeChat, following a US government directive to prohibit the use of other “untrusted” applications and services from China.

The restrictions announced on the basis of what Trump called national security threats move further away from the long-promoted American ideal of a global, open internet and could invite other countries to follow suit, analysts said.

“It’s really an attempt to fragment the internet and the global information society along US and Chinese lines, and shut China out of the information economy,” said Milton Mueller, a Georgia Tech University professor and founder of the Internet Governance Project.

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US weapon sales boss talks China, arms exports and his agency’s future

WASHINGTON — After years of working various jobs related to security cooperation, Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper took over the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency in August 2017. It was an appointment that coincided with a major push by the Trump administration to increase weapon sales as an economic driver. Three years later, as he gets ready to retire, Hooper sat down with Defense News for an exclusive exit interview.

This interview was edited for length and clarity.

You came in as DSCA director in 2017, when the Trump administration was making a concerted push to increase arms sales abroad. Has that push been successful?

Certainly I think the answer to that question is: “Yes, absolutely.” When I assumed responsibility at DSCA, we saw a convergence of three authorities that helped to create conditions that would help us to move forward and to elevate security cooperation. The first one was the

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In Post-COVID-19 China, Beauty Is Bigger Online Than Ever

SHANGHAI — The foot traffic at Parkson was middling at best. Although the well-known department store on Huaihai Road no longer had that eerie ghost town feeling that had settled upon the entire city in February when COVID-19 was at its peak in China, it could not exactly be described as lively either.

So when I paused in front of the Shiseido counter, I had the full attention of beauty adviser Mei, who had on an orange peachy lip shade and upwardly brushed brows. With the high summer heat, she suggested I look into some brightening products for my freckles and consider the Synchro Skin foundation to beat the humidity and what seemed like the constant downpour during Shanghai’s plum rain season.

Nothing out of the usual for a beauty shopping trip, but after I agreed on the right shade of Synchro Skin and purchased it with a scan of

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Nancy Pelosi Calls Out ‘the Trump Virus’ as Trump Continues to Call COVID-19 the ‘China Virus’

As President Donald Trump continues to refer to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as “the China virus” — despite widespread backlash — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this week flipped it around in an attack of her own.

In a Tuesday interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, Pelosi reacted to Trump’s latest coronavirus briefing at the White House and argued that, despite his more somber tone earlier in the day, he had exacerbated the pandemic in the U.S.

“If he had said months ago ‘Let’s wear a mask, let’s socially distance’ instead of having rallies and political-whatever-they-were, then more people would have followed his lead as the president of the United States, instead of being a bad example making it like a manhood thing not to wear a mask,” she said.

“A briefing on the coronavirus should be about science and that is something the president has ignored,” Pelosi, 80, added. “So I

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China Vows Retaliation After U.S. Shutters Houston Consulate

(Bloomberg) — China vowed retaliation after the U.S. forced the closure of its Houston consulate, in one of the biggest threats to diplomatic ties between the countries in decades.

The U.S. government gave China three days to close its consulate in America’s fourth-most populous city in an “unprecedented escalation,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a regular briefing Wednesday in Beijing. China planned to “react with firm countermeasures” if the Trump administration didn’t “revoke this erroneous decision,” Wang said.

The U.S. State Department subsequently confirmed in a statement that it had ordered the consulate shut “to protect American intellectual property and Americans’ private information.” It said international agreements required diplomats to respect the laws and regulations of the host nation and not interfere in its internal affairs.

The first signs of trouble came when Houston police and firefighters descended on the consulate following witness reports that papers were being burned

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China Vows Retaliation After U.S. Shuts Down Houston Consulate

(Bloomberg) — China vowed retaliation after the U.S. forced the closure of its Houston consulate, prompting stocks to fall in one of the biggest blows to diplomatic ties between the two countries in decades.

The U.S. government gave China three days to close its consulate in America’s fourth-most populous city in an “unprecedented escalation,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told a regular briefing Wednesday in Beijing. China planned to “react with firm countermeasures” if the Trump administration didn’t “revoke this erroneous decision,” Wang said.

The U.S. State Department subsequently confirmed in a statement that it had ordered the consulate closed “to protect American intellectual property and Americans’ private information.” It said international agreements required diplomats to respect the laws and regulations of the host nation and not interfere in its internal affairs.

The first signs of trouble came when Houston police and firefighters descended on the consulate following witness

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China firm uses workers to ‘pre-test’ vaccine in global race

BEIJING (AP) — In the global race to make a coronavirus vaccine, a state-owned Chinese company is boasting that its employees, including top executives, received experimental shots even before the government approved testing in people.

“Giving a helping hand in forging the sword of victory,” reads an online post from SinoPharm with pictures of workers it says helped “pre-test” its vaccine.

Whether it’s viewed as heroic sacrifice or a violation of international ethical norms, the claim underscores the enormous stakes as China competes with U.S. and British companies to be the first with a vaccine to help end the pandemic — a feat that would be both a scientific and political triumph.

“Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is the new Holy Grail,” said Lawrence Gostin, a global public health law expert at Georgetown University. “The political competition to be the first is no less consequential than the race for the moon

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