College

College football players deserves answers amid uncertainty

The people running college football owe the players an answer. With the 2020 season on the brink and the careers of the athletes in flux, there’s a simple question that no coach, administrator or commissioner can answer right now: “What’s next?”

All signs over the weekend continued to point to a great unwinding of the 2020 college football season. At the same time, a unified and unprecedented movement began on Sunday night – led by Clemson’s Trevor Lawrence and linked by the #WeWantToPlay hashtag – to potentially give players a seat at the table as the decisions are made on the future of the sport. By late Sunday, there had been buy-in from players in all major conferences and the hope to “ultimately create a College Football Players Association.”

This unfolded in the wake of Big Ten presidents meeting for consecutive days to discuss the fate of the season, and

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Half of College Students Plan to Return to Campus for Fall Semester

Students enrolling in college for the 2020-21 school year are facing a very different set of circumstances than ever before. With the coronavirus pandemic still surging across the U.S., many colleges have delayed reopening for the new semester and instead, are sticking with online learning. Other schools plan to hold in-person classes, but with social distancing and other safety measures in place.

But are students willing to head back to campus? According to the findings of the latest Student Loan Hero survey, 1 in 3 students do feel ready to return. But an even greater number (about 45%) said they would prefer to take classes online. And the majority of students want a tuition discount for this new model of remote learning.

Here’s what we found from our survey of 1,050 full-time college students.

Key findings Just over a third — 34% — of college students will return to campus

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College students face financial strains, health concerns from pandemic ahead of fall semester

Brittany Goddard’s final semester at Howard University isn’t the dream ending she imagined in Washington, D.C. 

When the coronavirus pandemic shut down the U.S. economy in March, she scrambled to pack up her belongings since she had to be out of her dorm room within 48 hours. At the same time, she lost her part-time job at a catering company and still hasn’t received unemployment after filing for jobless benefits in April. 

She was set to study abroad in Barcelona over the summer, but those plans were upended due to the pandemic. And with just weeks to go before the fall semester begins, she’s worried about how she’ll pay the remaining balance of her tuition and fees – roughly $9,000 – since her financial aid won’t cover it at the private school.

“It’s heartbreaking. I’m a low-income student. I can’t afford tuition,” Goddard, 20, says, who’s created a GoFundMe page

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Georgia college students stage ‘die-in’ to protest school opening plans: ‘We are not dispensable’

Students and faculty members at the University of Georgia staged an August 6 “die-in” protest in response to the school’s fall plans. (Screenshot: CBS46)
Students and faculty members at the University of Georgia staged an August 6 “die-in” protest in response to the school’s fall plans. (Screenshot: CBS46)

Students at the University of Georgia staged a “die-in” demonstration — playing dead on the campus lawn — to protest the school’s August 20 opening plans.

The Thursday event, which included 50 graduate and undergraduate students, along with faculty members, was organized by the United Campus Workers of Georgia, a higher education union. Spread out 6 feet apart, participants lay motionless on the grass outside the office of university president Jere W. Morehead, holding makeshift tombstones and signs that read, “RIP Campus Safety” and “We are not dispensable.”

This fall, the University of Georgia will offer different course options: Some classes will be held face-to-face with social distancing measures, others will combine in-person lessons with various online components, while some will be fully virtual. The school

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How bad is COVID-19 where your child goes to college? Here’s where to look

Looking at the statistics can help make a difficult decision easier. <span class="copyright">(Murugiah For The Times)</span>
Looking at the statistics can help make a difficult decision easier. (Murugiah For The Times)

We’re answering readers’ questions about life during the pandemic:

Where can I find trustworthy statistics on how COVID-19 affects young adults?

When the University of Pennsylvania reversed its plans for in-person instruction on July 31, provost Wendell Pritchett wrote that “1.5 million new cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in the United States, with the confirmed case count soaring from 2.4 million on June 25 to 3.9 million on July 22. This means that almost 40% of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States since the beginning of the pandemic have been reported in the last month.”

In the announcement, the university linked to data compiled by the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center in reaching its decision. This information source is available to the public online and is considered among the most reliable

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Folsom woman employed in college admissions scheme agrees to guilty plea

A Folsom woman has agreed to plead guilty for her role in a sweeping college administration bribery scandal that has swept up a number of wealthy people, college coaches and celebrities.

Mikaela Sanford, 34, of Folsom, will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit racketeering, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Boston announced Friday.

Sanford worked for Rick Singer, the 59-year-old California man who federal investigators say ran a standardized test cheating racket through his college counseling business and nonprofit.

Prosecutors say Sanford took online classes for students so the students could submit the grades Sanford earned in their names as part of their application packages to colleges and universities.

Sanford also helped fake athletic profiles and other documents to bolster students’ college applications to make the students appear to be highly successful high school athletes when, in fact, they were not, prosecutors said.

Prosecutors will recommend a sentence

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How to find COVID-19 statistics about your child’s college

Looking at the statistics can help make a difficult decision easier. <span class="copyright">(Murugiah For The Times)</span>
Looking at the statistics can help make a difficult decision easier. (Murugiah For The Times)

We’re answering readers’ questions about life during the pandemic:

Where can I find trustworthy statistics on how COVID-19 affects young adults?

When the University of Pennsylvania reversed its plans for in-person instruction on July 31, provost Wendell Pritchett wrote that “1.5 million new cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in the United States, with the confirmed case count soaring from 2.4 million on June 25 to 3.9 million on July 22. This means that almost 40% of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States since the beginning of the pandemic have been reported in the last month.”

In the announcement, the university linked to data compiled by the Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center in reaching its decision. This information source is available to the public online and is considered among the most reliable

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College students launch free online tutoring service to help stressed parents during pandemic

Friends Angela Sun, Madeleine Zheng, and Mae Zhang want to make things easier on parents who are trying to juggle work and helping their kids with school, so they launched a free virtual tutoring service that provides help with everything from biology to economics.

Sun, Zheng, and Zhang are graduates of University High School in Tucson. They started Cov Tutors in July, and when they opened registration, five students signed up. “The very next day, numbers doubled,” Sun, a student at the University of Pennsylvania, told KOLD. They offer one-on-one Zoom sessions, with each student receiving one to two hours of tutoring, one to three times a week.

The tutors assist with homework and give lectures, so it feels like they are in “a classroom setting,” Sun said. Some students have signed up to prepare for upcoming courses, while others need a refresher in certain subjects. Zheng, a student at

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Quarantine Rule a Costly Complication for College Students

As college students nationwide get ready to head back to school, places including New York, Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. are recommending or requiring some out-of-state students self-quarantine before classes begin.

Some say it’s adding extra financial hardship, such as paying for a place to stay before classes begin, on top of an already uncertain academic year.

“I go to SUNY for a reason,” said Eunice Ledres. “I don’t have money to go to like a fancy school. So it has been really hard financially.”

She attends one of New York’s 28 state universities and doesn’t want to take all of her classes online.

Out-of-state and international enrollment has reportedly been on the rise for colleges nationwide. While states like Hawaii and Florida are offering academic exemptions to quarantining, the Empire State isn’t one of them.

Since Ledres is coming from Nevada, one of the more than 30 states currently on

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The New College Drop-Off

Matthew and Audrey Lorence at their home in Needham, Mass., July 28, 2020. (Katherine Taylor/The New York Times)
Matthew and Audrey Lorence at their home in Needham, Mass., July 28, 2020. (Katherine Taylor/The New York Times)

Maureen Rayhill of Seattle sounds like a public health official as she describes the current process for coronavirus testing, rattling off research she’s done on in-person testing centers versus mail-order companies and how their turnaround times for results compare. But she’s not. She’s a mother, just trying to get her oldest child to college.

The poignant annual tradition of college drop-off — parents driving the new, nervous college student to school, bringing along brothers and sisters to see their sibling’s new home, setting up the tiny dorm room together, sharing one last meal with the entire family, then waving goodbye as the almost-adult runs off with a big pack of possible new best friends — has become the latest family milestone rendered almost unrecognizable by the coronavirus pandemic.

Rayhill, 49, has already

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