Colleges

Ex-Cal Player Luc Bequette a Starter in Boston’s College’s Opening Win

Back on September 8, 11 days before Boston College’s season-opening game, Eagles first-year coach Jeff Hafley announced defensive lineman Luc Bequette had joined the Boston College roster after transferring from Cal.

“We are trying to get him acclimated as fast as we can, give him a helmet and let’s roll,” Hafley said on September 8, according to the Boston Herald.

Apparently Bequette got acclimated quickly, because he was a starting defensive tackle in Boston College’s 4-3 defense — a defense that was outstanding in the Eagles’ 26-6 road victory over Duke in Boston College’s opener on Saturday.

Bequette did not record any statistics, but the TV commentators for the game apparently mentioned during the second quarter that Bequette was doing a good job in anchoring the defensive front.

The Eagles allowed a first-quarter touchdown on a 49-yard run but shut out Duke the rest of the way. It was a

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What a U.S. Liberal Arts Education Can Provide International Students | Best Colleges

German national Tim Steinebach says he was interested in almost everything related to philosophy, but never really considered applying to a U.S. liberal arts college. That is, until an admissions officer from this type of college visited his school.

“I learned about St. John’s and immediately fell in love with the idea of reading 200 of the greatest books of the West and discussing them without the authoritative interpretations of secondary literature or lecturing professors,” says Steinebach, now a sophomore at St. John’s College in New Mexico, which along with its Maryland location, has a single academic program called the Great Books program.

Liberal arts colleges offer four-year degrees that are broad in breadth – providing the ability to explore other interests beyond an academic major – and are focused on the humanities, sciences and social sciences.

“The U.S. is the home of this style of education – it originated

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11 MD Colleges Make Princeton Review’s ‘Best’ List For 2021

MARYLAND —The Princeton Review has released its annual list of the country’s best colleges. The 2021 list, which features 386 schools, includes 11 in Maryland.

The colleges were selected based on “our high opinion of their academics,” according to the Princeton Review. The organization says it monitors colleges “continuously and annually” to collect data on more than 2,000 schools.

To determine the “best,” Princeton Review staff visits schools and communicates with hundreds of college administrators.

“We pay close attention to feedback we get about colleges from students, parents, educators, and our own staff at the Princeton Review locations across the country,” the organization said in a statement.

Here are the Maryland colleges named among the country’s best by the Princeton Review; they are not put in any order but are listed alphabetically by location:

  • St. John’s College, Annapolis

  • U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis

  • Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

  • Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore

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5 Wisconsin Colleges Make Princeton Review’s 2021 ‘Best’ List

MILWAUKEE, WI — The Princeton Review this week released its annual list of the country’s best colleges. This year’s list, which features 386 schools, includes 5 in Wisconsin.

The 2021 Best 386 Colleges were selected based on “our high opinion of their academics,” the Princeton Review said in announcing its newest list. The organization said it monitors colleges “continuously and annually” to collect data on more than 2,000 schools.

In determining the “best,” The Princeton Review said it also visits schools and communicates with hundreds of college administrators in compiling its assessment.

“We pay close attention to the feedback we get about colleges from students, parents, educators, and our own staff at The Princeton Review locations across the country,” the organization said.

Here are the Wisconsin colleges named among the country’s best by Princeton Review

Princeton Review also announced which of the “Best” schools earned a place in its 29th

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29 PA Colleges Make Princeton Review’s ‘Best’ List For 2021

PENNSYLVANIA —The Princeton Review has released its annual list of the country’s best colleges. The 2021 list, which features 386 schools, includes 29 in Pennsylvania.

The colleges were selected based on “our high opinion of their academics,” the Princeton Review said in announcing its newest list. The organization says it monitors colleges “continuously and annually” to collect data on more than 2,000 schools.

In determining the “best,” The Princeton Review says it also visits schools, and communicates with hundreds of college administrators in compiling its assessment.

“We pay close attention to feedback we get about colleges from students, parents, educators, and our own staff at The Princeton Review locations across the country,” the organization said.

Here are the Pennsylvania colleges named among the country’s best by Princeton Review:

(The institution is followed by its location, and full-time enrollment.)

  • Muhlenberg College, Allentown, 2,251

  • Moravian College, Bethlehem, 2,073

  • Lehigh University, Bethlehem, 5,178

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Student Loan Debt Should Be Canceled. Until Then, Here Are The States & Colleges With The Lowest Student Debt

ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO – AUGUST 17: A student walks on campus classes begin amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the first day of the fall 2020 semester at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university has moved to a hybrid instruction model that includes a mixture of in-person and remote classes. According to the school, about 70 percent of classes are being taught online. (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO – AUGUST 17: A student walks on campus classes begin amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the first day of the fall 2020 semester at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, the university has moved to a hybrid instruction model that includes a mixture of in-person and remote classes. According to the school, about 70 percent of classes are being taught online. (Photo by Sam Wasson/Getty Images)

During the pandemic, it’s been hard enough to cover living expenses month to month — and it’s worse when so many of us are also saddled with college debt. There was some relief in March when the CARES Act was passed in Congress, which suspended federal student loan payments and set interest rates to 0% until September 30th initially. Recently, with no new stimulus package passed,

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International students turning away from US colleges for lots of reasons

Tune in to CBS This Morning from 7 to 9 a.m. EDT to catch USA TODAY education reporter Chris Quintana discussing college reopenings as part of the ongoing USA TODAY and CBS This Morning series “School Matters.”

Already reeling from the coronavirus, American colleges and universities now stand to lose hundreds of thousands of international students over the country’s failure to contain the pandemic, the challenges of online learning and a more hostile U.S. government.

Also at stake: billions of dollars the international students spend annually in the country, plus the intellectual capital of having many of the world’s best and brightest minds educated in America.

Nearly 1.1 million students came to the U.S. from other countries for college or practical training programs, according to the Institute for International Education’s latest Open Doors report, which the U.S. Department of State supports. Those students spend more than $40 billion a year

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Colleges’ best-laid coronavirus plans quickly come undone

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is ending in-person instruction for undergrads just a week after reopening, after dozens of students living in dorms and a fraternity house tested positive for coronavirus.

UNC is hardly the only institution experiencing an uptick in infections within days of students returning to campus. Bethel College in North Newton, Kan., reported a cluster of 46 confirmed cases of Covid-19 through mandatory entry testing. Officials said 482 people have been tested and many still await their results. At Oklahoma State University, a sorority house is under quarantine after reporting 23 cases.

The University of Notre Dame is seeing a spike in coronavirus cases, too. More than a quarter of its 58 confirmed cases rolled in over the weekend. University officials said the the vast majority of new cases could be “traced to a single off-campus gathering.”

Only a fraction of colleges have started

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COVID-19 will hit colleges when students arrive for fall semester. So why open at all? Money is a factor.

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be — and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all?

In many cases, it comes back to money.

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Colleges already lost billions of dollars when they pivoted to digital instruction in the spring, in the form of refunded room-and-board payments and expensive technology for online courses. Another semester — or year — of online courses could be even worse, especially for universities without large endowments.

For any institution, online instruction also means no money

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Public colleges hide donors who seek to influence students. Will COVID-19 make it worse?

Long before the coronavirus hit the United States, cash-strapped public higher education systems looked to private donors to offset the steady decline in public funding, sometimes with significant secrecy and strings attached.

Critics fear the economic downturn could give donors more leverage to quietly influence curriculum, hiring and scholarships. Open government laws in many states already allow donors to demand that the public – including students and faculty – be kept in the dark.

The pandemic has presented universities a triple whammy: Reduced tax revenues slashing government support, online-only courses gutting dormitory and cafeteria revenues, and – with more students and families out of work – less ability to offset that loss with tuition increases.

“They are going to be desperate for funding,” said Douglas Beets, who teaches accounting at Wake Forest University, and has studied nearly two decades of university donations and donor demands.

Linda Durant, vice president of

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