COVID

NYU Stern Students Protest MBA Tuition Hike During COVID

MBA students at NYU Stern are protesting a 3.5% hike in tuition during the pandemic and asking for discounts of 5% to 10% due to the shift toward remote instruction. Stern photo

MBA students at New York University’s Stern School of Business are urging the school to reverse a decision to increase their annual tuition by 3.5% and instead grant a 5% to 10% discount as classes move online during the pandemic. The petition requesting a freeze of Stern’s $76,780 annual tuition, up from $74,184 a year earlier, has been signed by more than 300 students.

“Raising tuition during this time period feels wrong,” according to the statement signed “The NYU Stern MBA Class of 2021.” The letter was posted to Twitter by Stern second-year MBA Avik Banerjee who is doing his summer internship with Bain & Co. and reports that more than 300 students have signed the petition. “It

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More pro athletes opt out of season, Birx warns rural US, Texas doc fights ‘war against COVID, war against stupidity’

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion package Sunday, with stimulus checks, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Texas was among several states setting records for deaths in a week. One physician lamented that he

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Sturgis readies for 250,000 bikers; Texas doc fights ‘war against COVID, war against stupidity’; Birx warns rural US

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion package Sunday, with stimulus checks, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Texas was among several states setting records for deaths in a week. One physician lamented that he

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Texas doc fights ‘war against COVID and war against stupidity’; Birx warns rural Americans; stimulus talks drag on

Congressional leaders and White House officials return to the bargaining table this week with a $1 trillion package of stimulus checks, jobless benefit bonuses and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All combatants agree that some progress was made in talks Saturday, but no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among major sticking points – what will replace the $600 weekly unemployment benefit bonus that expired last week. The bonus more than doubled unemployment checks issued to tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of pandemic-driven recession.

““We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy … on the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Texas was among several states setting records for deaths in a week. One physician lamented

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After ‘warning light’, British PM halts COVID lockdown unwind

By Alistair Smout and Paul Sandle

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Friday postponed a planned easing of the coronavirus lockdown in England after a rise in infections amplified fears of a second deadly surge in COVID-19 cases.

Just hours after Britain imposed tougher measures on swathes of northern England, Johnson announced that casinos, bowling alleys and skating rinks, due to reopen on Saturday, would remain shut for at least two more weeks.

Wedding receptions would also not be allowed.

“We’re now seeing a warning light on the dashboard,” Johnson told reporters at an online news conference from Downing Street when asked about a second surge.

“Our assessment is that we should now squeeze that brake pedal in order to keep the virus under control.”

Britain’s death toll from COVID-19 is over 55,000 when deaths from suspected cases are included, and it has the highest “excess death”

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US Covid testing has been a historic catastrophe. Is Trump’s testing tsar Brett Giroir to blame?

<span>Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/EPA</span>
Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/EPA

Jesuit high school, an all-boys Catholic school in New Orleans, is proud of its alumni. In 1978, its website records, student debaters Moises Arriaga and Brett Giroir “had a legendary season, winning the City Championship, District Championship, State Championship and the NFL National Championship”.

Forty-two years later, Giroir’s debating skills are facing their ultimate test. As Donald Trump’s coronavirus testing tsar, he is repeatedly grilled by America’s top political news hosts about what is seen as an epic disaster. And despite his gilded career at school, Giroir’s qualifications and track record have come under increasing scrutiny as the US pandemic death toll tops 150,000.

“What he does over and over again in his public statements is always put the most positive spin he can on what is clearly just an abysmal failure in terms of the US testing strategy,” said Jeremy Konyndyk, who led the government response

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Does the Covid pandemic spell the end of public schools?

We might be entering the last days of public education in America. The United States, which led the world in expanding access to public education to boys and girls in the 1800s, is poised to become the first rich nation to abandon that commitment as longstanding political efforts to undermine public schools meet the existential threat posed by the coronavirus. As privileged parents determine what to do if schools are closed or online this fall, their individual choices could, in the aggregate, presage a shift away from public education and back to the market-based private education that predated it.

Public schools have been under threat for decades, as leaders in both parties pushed for school choice, charters and vouchers. That effort has gained renewed steam under the Trump administration. Even before the pandemic, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos made providing public funding for families seeking to opt out of the

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COVID Hits USC Students And Faculty Hard As Virus Spreads To Younger Population

A coronavirus outbreak has hit USC’s fraternity row, where about 40 people tested positive for COVID-19, USC Student Health’s chief health officer Dr. Sarah Van Orman told the Los Angeles Times.

“A significant number of the cases were associated with four fraternity houses,” Van Orman said. The outbreak did not stop there, however.

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In all, about 150 Trojan students and employees have tested positive so far, even as the school has moved the vast majority of classes online, canceled events, limited on-campus housing, added mask requirements as well as social-distancing and symptom-checking measures.

“Unless all of us understand that right now our only tools are physical distancing and wearing masks, we’re going to continue to have devastation, not only in terms of the economy, our learning, our academics, our jobs, but people dying,” Van Orman said. “Each of us have to decide what we stand for. Frats

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College During COVID

At Kiplinger, the name of the game is value. For more than 20 years, our annual college rankings have been no exception. Over the years, we analyzed data on hundreds of public and private colleges and universities across the nation seeking institutions that deliver a high-quality education at an affordable price.

But this year, as the coronavirus forced schools to shutter in mid March and transformed the higher-education system practically overnight, we put our rankings on pause. Instead, we decided to focus on strategies for getting the most value out of a reeling higher-education system, including transfers, gap years and increased financial aid.

For Mika Garcia, a 21-year-old rising senior at the University of West Florida (UWF), the pandemic shutdown meant a softball season cut short. “It was extremely heartbreaking,” she says. “Everything was shut down—no weights, no practice, no games, no visiting one another. It was a weird and … Read More

Florida sets record for deaths in a day; COVID killing a Texan every 6 minutes, 16 seconds; Marlins’ season paused

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 was nearing 150,000 on Tuesday as several states set weekly fatality records and Florida reported a one-day record for deaths. Further confirming the Sunshine State’s troubles with the coronavirus, the Miami Marlins’ season was temporarily suspended after 15 players and two staff members tested positive.

Dr. Anthony Fauci of the president’s coronavirus task force said the Marlins’ outbreak could endanger the Major League Baseball season, although he told ABC’s “Good Morning America” he doesn’t believe games need to stop now. 

Florida’s 186 deaths raised the toll there to more than 6,000. Gov. Ron DeSantis, who three weeks ago ordered in-classroom learning when schools reopen next month, has eased his rhetoric in recent days. He now wants schools to ensure parents have “the choice between in-person and distance learning” for their kids.

In Tennessee, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator, urged Gov.

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