COVID19

Screening university students could reduce community COVID-19 burden

Researchers in Canada and the United States report that screening students for infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as universities re-open this fall could reduce the burden of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the broader community.

The team conducted a model-based analysis to estimate the impact that the return of a relatively large student population would have on the rate of COVID-19 infections in a mid-sized city, where the number of cases was relatively few, prior to students returning.

Lauren Cipriano (University of Western Ontario) and colleagues from the London Health Sciences Centre and the University of Minnesota School of Public Health say the findings suggest that the return of such a student population would significantly increase the number of COVID-19 cases in the community.

The study also suggests that routine testing of students would prevent the number of infections in this population and provide significant public

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University of Kentucky cancels spring break 2021 because of COVID-19

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The University of Kentucky will not have a spring break in 2021. 

Citing the need to keep students on campus as much as possible during the coronavirus pandemic, UK announced the change Thursday, which is on par with decisions from multiple universities around the country. 

UK wants to make sure students don’t travel around and bring more coronavirus cases back to Lexington. It cancelled the fall break as well and required testing for all on-campus students this semester. 

Other universities to cancel spring break include the Ohio State University, Purdue University, California State University, The University of Iowa, Iowa State University, the University of Northern Iowa and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

“We appreciate the patience of our community as we plan, once again, for reinvented operations this spring,” said an email sent to the campus community from President Eli Capilouto. “This is not how we envisioned this year, but

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Parents of college kids won’t stop having ‘the talk’ about Covid-19 protocol

Lourdes Pelaez-Kingery was recovering from appendix surgery when she got the phone call that parents of college-age kids have come to dread in this time of coronavirus: Her daughter tearfully explained that she had moved out of her dorm at Texas A&M University-San Antonio days earlier after her suitemates threw a party and 14 unmasked friends showed up.



a group of people walking in front of a building: The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, was nearly empty on May 7 as classes were canceled due to the pandemic. Fall semester classes are currently online only.


© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, was nearly empty on May 7 as classes were canceled due to the pandemic. Fall semester classes are currently online only.

“She told me she had moved off-campus to family friends of ours and then begged me to let her come home,” said Pelaez-Kingery, a health care worker who lives in League City, Texas. “Because of my job and her dad’s — he’s a critical care nurse — she knew there was no way she could come home if she

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Teacher shortage, Covid-19 create perfect storm for education system

The debate over how and where to educate students, from preschool to university, has been among the fiercest fought throughout the pandemic. Nearly every solution presents challenges for parents, students and teachers alike.

The Covid-19 crisis and an ongoing nationwide shortage of qualified teachers have created a perfect storm in the education system that may only worsen in the months to come.

Educators such as Cynthia Robles are feeling it firsthand.

Robles is a special education teacher at Roger Williams Middle School in Providence, Rhode Island, with more than two decades of experience. She is currently working in school, doing both in-person and remote learning, while helping to cover other classes during unassigned periods to make up for a lack of substitute teachers in the district.

“It’s truly a challenge every day. Teaching is challenging anyway, but with the lack of teachers in some rooms, and the rest of us

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Despite COVID-19, University of Georgia, Georgia Southern, Georgia Tech Thirsty for In-Person Classes

As the number of coronavirus cases exploded across the University of Georgia’s Athens campus in late August, some faculty began asking department heads about shifting from in-person classes to an online curriculum. 

After fielding several requests, one faculty chair emailed a dire warning to members of his department: the university would reject any official requests to switch to online learning. And if professors attempted to switch unofficially, the state university system was prepared to track them down.

“I’ve been advised that physical audits (by USG auditors) may take place that check to see that… the class is meeting the day/time/classroom that is listed in the instructional plan,” the chair wrote in an email obtained by The Daily Beast on the condition that the author not be identified. USG refers to University System of Georgia, the governing body of the state’s 26 public universities.

Objections from students taking the classes,

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The best medicine for a COVID-19 economy? More education and training

Reading the tea leaves of a U.S. economy reshaped by COVID-19 has sent economic analysts and prognosticators into overdrive. Many see a move away from big cities and into simpler, socially distanced life in small towns. If this happens at scale, it could be a boon to heretofore “left-behind” places in the Midwest and other regions.

Others predict significant drops in demand for jobs with low education and training requirements, driven by automation and the growth of technology needed to operate socially distanced offices, warehouses, manufacturing facilities and even restaurants. A recently released analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia lends support to this idea.

Policymakers can adopt policies to help improve wages and opportunities in jobs with fewer credentialing requirements, for example by helping smaller manufacturers and boosting the minimum wage. But policy also needs to directly address the need for more workers with higher skills due both

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How The University Of Arizona Is Handling COVID-19 On Campus : NPR

NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with mathematical biologist Joanna Masel of the University of Arizona about how the university is testing and tracing students for COVID-19.



LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Colleges and universities are opening up and sometimes quickly shutting down as the coronavirus takes hold on campus. So what is a school to do? The University of Arizona has a couple of innovations. One involves an app. And the other is a bit less polite. Joanna Masel is a mathematical biologist at the university. And she joins us now. Welcome to the program.

JOANNA MASEL: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You helped develop the COVID Watch app there. How does it work?

MASEL: So you download it. And if all goes well, that’s it. You just activate it. And you never hear from it again. But all – in the background, it’s listening to little anonymous pings to find out who’s near you

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Education Taskforce Releases Report Highlighting COVID-19 Inequities in School

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An education task force released a report Monday highlighting the urgency for every San Diego County student to have equitable access to learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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For distance learning to be equitable, teachers must have training, parents and caregivers must have resources and students have supportive learning environments, according to the Equitable Distance Learning Taskforce — a countywide group of school districts, education experts, nonprofit organizations and community leaders.

The report says that technological devices and sufficient connectivity are a necessary educational investment, but not enough to promote equity in learning.

“We all have a responsibility and role to play in supporting San Diego’s children, youth and families,” said Erin Hogeboom, director of San Diego for Every Child — a nonprofit dedicated to cutting child poverty in San Diego County by 50%

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Newton mayor relays concerns about rising COVID-19 cases to Boston College officials

“They need to act now to protect the health of their Boston College community and all of our Newtonians,” she said.

“Boston College community members are integrally connected with Newton — they live, shop, dine & drink, play sports, work and recreate amongst our community,” she said in an e-mail to Newton residents later Saturday evening. “When COVID-19 spikes within the Boston College community, this impacts all of us in Newton.”

The concern comes after a notable increase last week in the number of positive cases at the college, especially among athletes.

So far 104 people have tested positive at the college, including 67 in the past week, according to testing numbers published Saturday by the university. Thirty of the college’s 750 varsity athletes have tested positive, BC spokesman Jack Dunn said Saturday.

Many of the student-athlete cases are linked to an off-campus gathering, where students watched a basketball game

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COVID-19 update cases, deaths in Johnson County

At 10 a.m. Monday, Iowa was reporting an additional 558 cases of COVID-19 and just two additional COVID-19-related deaths since the state’s tally at 10 a.m. Sunday, according to Coronavirus.Iowa.gov.

Officials report a total of 1,167 people with COVID-19 have died from the disease across the state, including 26 in Johnson County. A pair of deaths reported Aug. 27 were the county’s 17th and 18th in a six-week stretch. Between June and the first part of July, the county had gone more than seven weeks without reporting a death related to the disease; the first death related to the disease was reported on April 4.

Officials reported just 99 influenza-related deaths in the entire state of Iowa in the 2019-20 flu season.

A total of 671,049 Iowans have been tested for the SARS-CoV-2 novel coronavirus, which causes the disease, including 34,496 in Johnson County. A total of 70,314 have tested

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