credibility

How to project credibility as workplace meetings move online

<span class="caption">Amid the global work-from-home phenomenon, what a presenter says carries more weight than ever.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/woman-in-front-of-a-device-screen-in-video-royalty-free-image/1218569498?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Getty Images">Getty Images</a></span>
Amid the global work-from-home phenomenon, what a presenter says carries more weight than ever. Getty Images

COVID-19 has altered nearly every aspect of American life, including the workplace. For millions of Americans, the kitchen or the living room now doubles as the office and conference room.

This workspace shift, likely to last long past the pandemic, offers some conveniences, of course, but it also teems with potential pitfalls.

Traditional tactics for achieving credibility in presentations – audience interaction and engaging body language, for example – are not accessible when you appear on a laptop or smartphone screen.

Suddenly, what you say carries more weight than ever.

As an English language studies professor, I wanted to understand how presenters build credibility, so I analyzed the transcripts of 30 panel discussions at the Brookings Institution in 2019 to glean the verbal strategies used by foreign affairs experts. While I have carefully dissected

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