Emerge

Fred Swaniker on How Entrepreneurs Could Help Africa Emerge Stronger From the Coronavirus Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has crippled much of the global economy, with potentially disastrous impacts for many African nations. But there are signs of hope, too. Fred Swaniker, a Ghanian entrepreneur and leadership expert, says that a generation of young entrepreneurs is already working across the continent to develop new and innovative enterprises in the face of hardship.

“If we reimagine how we live and do business on the continent, we can actually turn this into an opportunity and not a crisis,” Swaniker said during Tuesday’s TIME100 Talks.

While Swaniker recognizes that a global economic recession will make it harder for African countries to grow their economies and create jobs, he believes that the constraints posed by the virus “will drive innovation.” The shift toward online, remote work, for example, could open up new employment opportunities for some of the best-educated Africans, without them needing to leave the continent.

However, innovation

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With remote back-to-school, child care challenges for providers, families emerge

Student Masks.
Student Masks.

CINCINNATI – As school officials chalk up plans for students to learn off-site, in schools or both this fall, child care providers across the country are working to create more safe spaces and care scenarios for kids. 

And they’re doing it under pressure.

School plans are iffy, so solutions must be fluid. Care centers are already working with their own coronavirus pandemic guidelines for children, often with crippling costs. 

“We are in the midst of a tornado, and we’re trying to figure out how to educate in the middle of it. The tornado is COVID-19. It is not letting up,” said Jorge Perez, president and CEO of YMCA of Greater Cincinnati.

“The systems are in flux. We are going to have to be speedy. We are going to need additional funding.”

That need was expressed nationwide among child care providers who took part in a survey from the 

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Many Companies Won’t Survive the Pandemic. Amazon Will Emerge Stronger Than Ever

The pandemic has upended businesses across the world, but it has been very good for Amazon. Every lockdown “click to purchase” nudged the company a little further toward utter domination of online shopping as total e-commerce sales nearly doubled in May. But if bigger was better for everyone, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos would not be appearing before Congress on Wednesday for an antitrust hearing.

Charlene Anderson, and sellers like her, are one reason why he’ll be there. Anderson is among the many merchants who sell goods on Amazon — and who together account for more than half of sales on the site. But they pay, too: Amazon charges Anderson a $39.99 monthly fee to post her knitting and craft supplies on its site, and it takes a cut of about 30 percent on each item she sells. Anderson’s seller experience has worsened during the pandemic as Amazon exercised

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