experts

Money Experts Share the Smartest Ways To Boost Your Net Worth

Once you’ve reached the phase of your financial life when you’ve paid off your debts and have a healthy emergency fund tucked away in a savings account, it’s time to shift your focus to building your net worth. GOBankingRates spoke with four money experts on how they accumulated wealth, and their personal finance journeys can inspire you to do the same.

Click through to find out how to increase your wealth.

Last updated: Jan. 8, 2019

Starting Your Journey Toward Financial Success

“Financial success” means different things to different people, but if your goal is to increase your overall wealth, you might not know how to start. Keep reading to learn experts’ tried-and-true tips to improve your net worth.

Start With Cutting Out Unnecessary Expenses

“Set a weekly and monthly budget and stick to it no matter how tempted you are to buy those concert tickets or daily iced coffee

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Conspiracy theories around COVID-19 continue to spread. Experts weigh in on why people believe them.

More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

When Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert, a Republican who has publicly shunned face masks, tested positive for COVID-19 on Wednesday, the news sparked a chain reaction. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced new rules that required lawmakers to wear masks on the House floor, and several members of the House revealed that they were planning to go into quarantine.

Soon after, Gohmert released a video on Twitter, revealing that he is asymptomatic. He then shared a conspiracy theory about wearing masks that, apparently, he also believes. Gohmert said he “can’t help but wonder” if he contracted COVID-19 from adjusting his mask with his hands. “It is interesting, and I don’t know about everybody, but when I have a mask

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Why experts say pandemic dating may ‘lead to more stable relationships’

Quarantining and social distancing may not seem romantic, but some data indicates that some people are thinking about dating more than before.

Tinder recorded its highest single day of swiping this year, while Bumble hit a milestone of 100 million users. Some apps, like Hinge, are integrating new features, like in-app video chatting, to help people connect online.

Dr. Helen Fisher, a biological anthropologist and the chief science advisor at Match.com, has studied love and relationships for 40 years and she told TODAY’s Jenna Bush Hager that the pandemic has led to a major change on dating apps.

“This pandemic has led to more conversations, on all of the dating sites actually, more meaningful conversations, more self-disclosure, more intimacy (and) less anxiety about sex and money,” she said Monday on TODAY with Hoda and Jenna, adding that she thinks the pandemic may have actually improved the modern dating world for

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Why are Arizona casinos still open despite experts saying they’re high-risk during COVID-19 spike?

Plexiglas is placed around slot machines, gaming tables, and other areas at the Lone Butte Casino in Chandler on May 14, 2020. Casinos under the Gila River Indian Community were planning to reopen during the COVID-19 pandemic with new safety measures on May 15, 2020.
Plexiglas is placed around slot machines, gaming tables, and other areas at the Lone Butte Casino in Chandler on May 14, 2020. Casinos under the Gila River Indian Community were planning to reopen during the COVID-19 pandemic with new safety measures on May 15, 2020.

Movie theaters across Arizona are empty.

Gyms have locked their doors.

And restaurants are filled with taped-off tables, welcoming half of the customers they would usually see for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

But casinos, which operate on tribal land in Arizona, are open for business, despite health experts warning that customers are engaging in a high-stakes gamble: risking their health along with their money.

Casinos are the only business designated as high-risk by Arizona’s health department that remain unrestricted amid the recent COVID-19 spike in the state.

But some public health experts say they shouldn’t be. Dr. Shad Marvasti, director of public health at the

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Can You Get COVID Again? It’s Very Unlikely, Experts Say

Megan Kent near her home in Salem, Mass., on July 17, 2020. (Kayana Szymczak/The New York Times)
Megan Kent near her home in Salem, Mass., on July 17, 2020. (Kayana Szymczak/The New York Times)

The anecdotes are alarming. A woman in Los Angeles seemed to recover from COVID-19 but weeks later took a turn for the worse and tested positive again. A New Jersey doctor claimed several patients healed from one bout only to become reinfected with the coronavirus. And another doctor said a second round of illness was a reality for some people, and was much more severe.

These recent accounts tap into people’s deepest anxieties that they are destined to succumb to COVID over and over, feeling progressively sicker, and will never emerge from this nightmarish pandemic. And these stories fuel fears that we won’t be able to reach herd immunity — the ultimate destination where the virus can no longer find enough victims to pose a deadly threat.

But the anecdotes are just that

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Nearly 3,500 Public Health Experts Sign Letter Defending Fauci Amid White House Attacks

Nearly 3,500 public health experts sent an open letter to President Donald Trump amid a spate of attacks launched over the last two weeks at Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, calling those seeking to undercut him a “dangerous distraction.”

In the letter, which was organized by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the group calls the coronavirus pandemic “one of the greatest challenges the United States has faced in its history.” But the signatories, which include two previous heads of the Food and Drug Administration, a former U.S. surgeon general and a former secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, said they were troubled by efforts to smear Fauci, who they said has provided a clear voice to Americans during the health crisis.

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, he has remained one of the world’s most trusted scientists on COVID-19, daily

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Experts Say a COVID-19 Vaccine Likely Won’t Arrive Until Fall 2021

From Good Housekeeping

  • There are more than 150 COVID-19 vaccines currently in trials across the globe, per the World Health Organization.

  • Experts postulate that some human trials may conclude in late 2020, but a vaccine won’t arrive until spring 2021 at the earliest, and a majority won’t be available until that fall.

  • Trials will establish how effective a vaccine is, whether it’ll stop you from getting sick again, and how many shots you’ll need for best results.

After four months of quarantines, social distancing, and disrupted routines, it’s the one question that almost everyone has on their minds: When will a new coronavirus vaccine be ready? The answer, just like every other aspect of this new virus thus far, isn’t clear. But creating an effective vaccine is only half the battle, say leading health experts who work with international data and set policies here in the United States, and usually

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Many public health experts say children should return to school in the fall, particularly in states like Maryland

In the raging national debate over whether to reopen schools, advocates on both sides are basing their arguments on a range of factors: political, economic and emotional.

But there is a growing consensus in the public health and scientific community that schools should resume in-person classes this fall — particularly in states such as Maryland, where cases have not spiked as they have elsewhere.

To be sure, these experts say safety precautions will be necessary to reopen schools. But they say an assessment of risks versus benefits points to the wisdom of reopening.

The latest available data suggests that children are less likely to become infected with the coronavirus and less likely than adults to develop severe cases. In addition, health experts say children appear not to spread the virus to family members and other adults as efficiently as flu and other common illnesses.

While public health experts and some

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With college looming, experts answer 6 of parents’ most pressing questions

No one knows what the new academic year will look like at colleges. <span class="copyright">(Simone Noronha / For The Times)</span>
No one knows what the new academic year will look like at colleges. (Simone Noronha / For The Times)

When civil engineering student Itzel Zapata returned to Cal Poly last month, her mother, Rebecca, sent her to San Luis Obispo prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I packed face masks, gloves and sanitizing wipes,” the Palmdale food services manager said. “We have to be prepared. I’m making sure both my daughters can identify the signs and know to quarantine themselves. I told them, ‘Let’s stay safe, healthy and make sure we stay alive.’”

As coronavirus cases have skyrocketed in California and across the country, Zapata said she is admittedly relieved Itzel is only three hours away and younger daughter Mariah, 18, who missed out on many milestones marking her senior year in high school, will be living at home when her fall classes start at the College of the Canyons in

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Loss of international students could damage US economy, experts say

The world of higher education, already struggling to cope amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was rocked last week when the Trump administration issued a regulation that would prevent international students from entering the country in addition to compelling thousands already in the U.S. to leave if enrolled in schools that plan to teach exclusively online in the fall.

“These students and their families have invested so much hope and money — in some cases, their families’ life savings — to get an American education,” Kavita Daiya, an associate professor of English at George Washington University, told ABC News. “By being here, they bring so much talent and knowledge to our communities. To force them to leave is to betray the promise of opportunity and fairness that undergirds American higher education.”

Implementation of the order could cost the U.S. tens of billions of dollars and thousands of jobs, but on Tuesday the

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