finding

Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic closed campuses this spring compared with fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in 2017 that they had

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As the president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances, and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic caused the closure of campuses this spring compared to fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in

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3 tips for finding a job and advancing your career amid the coronavirus pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic is an uncertain time for everyone, whether you have a job or are looking for one.

The unemployment rate in the United States has reached new heights, workers are adapting to the longer-term reality of working from home and many companies are slowing down hiring and promotions.

The unprecedented times have forced even career coaches to change the way they help workers.

MORE: 7 ways to turn your job now into a career you’ll still love later

Edith Cooper and Jordan Taylor are a mother-daughter duo who run Medley, a life and career coaching service. When the pandemic hit, they had to pivot their business from in-person coaching to virtual, so they know what people are going through.

Even with the uncertainty, Cooper and Taylor say people should not lose hope about either getting back into the workforce or advancing their careers.

“Prepare yourself to get comfortable

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