future

What’s the Green Fuel of the Future for Shipping?

1. What’s the fuel of the future for ships?

Ships burn about 5 million barrels of fossil fuel every day, pumping a constant stream of CO2 and other chemical nasties into the atmosphere. Yet figuring out the fuel of the future isn’t just about emissions. It’s got to have enough power to propel gigantic tankers around the globe, be storable and transportable, and, of course, not too costly. Here’s a list of the front-runners:

• Pros: Doesn’t produce any C02 emissions when made cleanly, which can be done by combining so-called green hydrogen with nitrogen from the air

• Cons: Much less energy dense than traditional fuel oils and so would need about three times as much space to contain the same amount of energy, a problem for ship designers; toxic for humans and aquatic life

• Pros: Is potent enough to send rockets into space and can be produced

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Deepfakes Are Amazing. They’re Also Terrifying for Our Future.

Photo credit: Ctrl Shift Face/YouTube
Photo credit: Ctrl Shift Face/YouTube

From Popular Mechanics

Imagine this: You click on a news clip and see the President of the United States at a press conference with a foreign leader. The dialogue is real. The news conference is real. You share with a friend. They share with a friend. Soon, everyone has seen it. Only later you learn that the President’s head was superimposed on someone else’s body. None of it ever actually happened.

Sound farfetched? Not if you’ve seen a certain wild video from YouTube user Ctrl Shift Face (take a look at the clip above). Since last August, it’s gotten almost 9.5 million views.

🌍 Our world is weird. Let’s navigate it together. 🌍

In it, comedian Bill Hader shares a story about his encounters with Tom Cruise and Seth Rogen. As Hader, a skilled impressionist, does his best Cruise and Rogen, those actors’ faces seamlessly,

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Is this new online-only private school the future of education?

boy studies on laptop
boy studies on laptop

As a parent of a teen facing her final year of GCSE study after months out of school – often with patchy teaching – I’m feeling decidedly nervous. Although the Government has promised to open schools in September, a new study says a lack of an effective track and trace system means this might not be safe. Adding to the chaos, a dreaded ‘second wave’ of COVID-19 may also lead to unpredictable local or national lockdowns. It’s not just parents like me who are concerned. As Scottish children mourn their disappointing GCSE grades, a new study, Life After Lockdown, from the nation’s leading youth programme NCS (National Citizen Service) has found that 67 per cent of teens aged 16-17 are worried about their education.  

The result? More and more parents are looking for alternatives to traditional schools. 

Across the UK, Google searches for the term’ online

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COVID-19 pandemic puts future of Catholics schools in doubt

As the new academic year arrives, school systems across the United States are struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Roman Catholic educators have an extra challenge — trying to forestall a relentless wave of closures of their schools that has no end in sight.

Already this year, financial and enrollment problems aggravated by the pandemic have forced the permanent closure of more than 140 Catholic schools nationwide, according to officials who oversee Catholic education in the country.

Three of the nation’s highest-ranking Catholic leaders, in a recent joint appeal, said Catholic schools “are presently facing their greatest financial crisis” and warned that hundreds more closures are likely without federal support.

“Because of economic loss and uncertainty, many families are confronting the wrenching decision to pull their children out of Catholic schools,” said New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Boston Cardinal Sean O’Malley and Los Angeles Archbishop José Gomez, president of

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Amid pandemic, future of many Catholic schools is in doubt

NEW YORK (AP) — As the new academic year arrives, school systems across the United States are struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Roman Catholic educators have an extra challenge — trying to forestall a relentless wave of closures of their schools that has no end in sight.

Already this year, financial and enrollment problems aggravated by the pandemic have forced the permanent closure of more than 140 Catholic schools nationwide, according to officials who oversee Catholic education in the country.

Three of the nation’s highest-ranking Catholic leaders, in a recent joint appeal, said Catholic schools “are presently facing their greatest financial crisis” and warned that hundreds more closures are likely without federal support.

“Because of economic loss and uncertainty, many families are confronting the wrenching decision to pull their children out of Catholic schools,” said New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Boston Cardinal Sean O’Malley and Los Angeles Archbishop

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Deepfakes are the most dangerous crime of the future, researchers say

A woman in Washington, DC, views a manipulated video on January 24, 2019, that changes what is said by President Donald Trump and former president Barack Obama, illustrating how deepfake technology can deceive viewers. - "Deepfake" videos that manipulate reality are becoming more sophisticated and realistic as a result of advances in artificial intelligence, creating a potential for new kinds of misinformation with devastating consequences: Credit: ROB LEVER/AFP via Getty Images
A woman in Washington, DC, views a manipulated video on January 24, 2019, that changes what is said by President Donald Trump and former president Barack Obama, illustrating how deepfake technology can deceive viewers. – “Deepfake” videos that manipulate reality are becoming more sophisticated and realistic as a result of advances in artificial intelligence, creating a potential for new kinds of misinformation with devastating consequences: Credit: ROB LEVER/AFP via Getty Images

Deepfakes are the most dangerous form of crime through artificial intelligence, according to a new report from University College London.

The term “deepfake” refers to a video where artificial intelligence and deep learning – an algorithmic learning method used to train computers – has been used to make a person appear to say something they have not.

Notable examples of it include a manipulated video of Richard Nixon’s Apollo 11 presidential address and Barack Obama insulting Donald Trump.

The

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US weapon sales boss talks China, arms exports and his agency’s future

WASHINGTON — After years of working various jobs related to security cooperation, Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper took over the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency in August 2017. It was an appointment that coincided with a major push by the Trump administration to increase weapon sales as an economic driver. Three years later, as he gets ready to retire, Hooper sat down with Defense News for an exclusive exit interview.

This interview was edited for length and clarity.

You came in as DSCA director in 2017, when the Trump administration was making a concerted push to increase arms sales abroad. Has that push been successful?

Certainly I think the answer to that question is: “Yes, absolutely.” When I assumed responsibility at DSCA, we saw a convergence of three authorities that helped to create conditions that would help us to move forward and to elevate security cooperation. The first one was the

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expert generalists are more likely to be successful in the future

A lot has changed in the last six months — uncertainty is the new normal. Change is nothing new but the recent development is massive.

The year 2020 will go down in history as the year that changed established systems, beliefs and conventional wisdom in all areas of life.

We are going through a historic transition — if you don’t adapt fast, you may be left behind. With the current global transformation, remote work-styles, and the uncertainty about work, the future will allow for (and incentivize) multiple career bets.

The rapidly evolving world requires us to drop conventional mindsets, let go of old rules of work, learn new skills fast and develop new habits that can help us thrive in the new world of work.

Our working lives will be different for a long time — you don’t have to miss out on anything: you can adapt, reinvent yourself and

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‘Trolls World Tour’ star Flula Borg on sugar-rush recordings and the future of cinemas (exclusive)

Flula Borg voices yodelling troll Dickory in 'Trolls World Tour'. (Credit: Amanda Edwards/WireImage/Universal)
Flula Borg voices yodelling troll Dickory in ‘Trolls World Tour’. (Credit: Amanda Edwards/WireImage/Universal)

Trolls World Tour voice actor Flula Borg has admitted he was “terrified” when Universal opted to release the film on-demand rather than in cinemas.

The studio opted not to delay the film in the early days of the coronavirus lockdown and instead used the animated sequel as a guinea pig for the new “premium video-on-demand” model.

Fortunately for all involved, the move proved a money-spinning success story — albeit one that sparked conflict with cinema chains.

Borg, who played yodelling troll Dickory in the colourful musical, told Yahoo Movies UK he was concerned about those who devoted years to working on the movie.

Read more: Films streaming early because of coronavirus

“As you know, I didn’t have a huge role, but there are people who have spent thousands of hours on this film,” said the 38-year-old musician

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What COVID-19 Can Teach Us About the ADA and the Future of Accessibility

Woman using laptop at home.
Woman using laptop at home.

The 30th anniversary of the passing of the ADA is here, and to be honest, I can’t help but reflect on how accessible and inaccessible my life has been made recently in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

I have a rare genetic condition that impacts all of my joints, organs, ligaments and tendons called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type 3. Recently, I have had to reckon with developing symptoms of type 6, particularly dramatic hearing loss and an ongoing developmental curvature in my spine and shoulders because of my stenosis and scoliosis. I also have a few mental illnesses and asthma, placing me in the high-risk category for COVID-19.

When I was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville three years ago, I didn’t fully recognize what the diagnosis would mean for the rest of my life. All I knew was that I was in constant pain,

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