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Latest AP Rankings, How to Watch Week 4 Games

After a relatively subdued start to the campaign, some of college football’s heavyweights return to action in Week 4. After delaying the start of its season by two weeks because of the coronavirus outbreak, the SEC opens its campaign on Saturday, with defending national champions LSU, Alabama and Georgia all in action.

The Crimson Tide, ranked No. 2 in the AP Top 25 Poll, begins its season on the road against Missouri, while No. 6 LSU welcomes Mississippi State and No. 4 Georgia takes on Arkansas on the road. Meanwhile, No. 1 Clemson has a bye after thrashing The Citadel 49-0 to improve to 2-0 and No. 7 Notre Dame travels to take on Wake Forest.

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Trevor Lawrence completed eight of nine attempts for 168 yards and three touchdowns, while Travis Etienne rushed for 68 yards over eight carries as the Tigers put the game against

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College football bowl projections: Big Ten return shakes up College Football Playoff, New Year’s Six games

It has been almost a month since my preseason bowl projections, and since then, a lot has changed. The biggest change is that we welcome the Big Ten back to the 2020 college football season.  The league canceled its football season back on Aug. 11 but then reversed course on Sept. 17 and announced it will play an eight-game schedule plus a ninth game for each team on its championship Saturday, which will be Dec. 19.

From a bowl perspective, adding the Big Ten back in gives us 90 teams from which to choose.  It also means another Power Five conference in play for the College Football Playoff.

Ohio State, the preseason No. 2 team in the AP Top 25, is now projected to have that same seed in the College Football Playoff.  Alabama drops down to No. 3 and Oklahoma falls to No. 4.  Georgia is still in the

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The biggest question facing college basketball heading into September: Will nonconference games be doable?

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College Basketball insiders give reason for optimism about a full basketball season
(3:22)

Eighty-three days remain until the scheduled start of the 2020-21 men’s college basketball season. 

Only 17 of Division I’s 357 programs have released a schedule. 

Charles Pipkins, who runs the D1 Docket website and Twitter account and diligently tracks the scheduling world of college hoops, told CBS Sports that in a normal year we’d be at or above 175 officially released schedules by now. This dawdling reveals what’s been assumed for months in college basketball circles: no one expects the season to start on time.

For some this has been a blessing.

“Nonconference scheduling has been easier this year than ever before because there’s the belief it’s not going to stay in its current form,” one mid-major coach told CBS Sports.

It’s been dreadful for others.

“[Our] schedule isn’t complete and anyone who

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Auburn to limit seating capacity for home games

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

Auburn will reduce Jordan-Hare Stadium’s seating capacity to about 20% at the start of the upcoming football season.

Athletic director Allen Greene said the move will lead to ”a shortfall of tens of millions of dollars this year.” He noted that football revenue finances each of Auburn’s 21 sports teams.

Auburn says all general seating tickets for the Sept. 26 opener against Kentucky will be reserved for students. That doesn’t include controlled premium spaces or tickets designated for guests of home or visiting players and coaches.

Auburn will announce ticket allocations for other games later.

Face coverings will be required for all spectators and gameday workers with no tailgating allowed.

Stadium capacity is 87,451, which means attendance will be limited to just over 17,000 fans.

Seattle Seahawks will play at least their first three

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Video games affect your moral development but only until you’re 18

  <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/teenage-girl-playing-video-game-late-1601423485" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Pixel-Shot/Shutterstock">Pixel-Shot/Shutterstock</a>, <span class="license">Author provided</span></span>
Pixel-Shot/Shutterstock, Author provided

Young people have probably spent much more of their time than usual playing video games over the last few months thanks to the coronvirus pandemic. One report from telecoms firm Verizon said online gaming use went up 75% in the first week of lockdown in the US.

What impact might this have on young people’s development? One area that people are often concerned about is the effect of video games, particularly violent ones, on moral reasoning. My colleagues and I recently published research that suggested games have no significant effect on the moral development of university-age students but can affect younger adolescents. This supports the use of an age-rating system for video game purchases.

Our sense of morality and the way we make moral decisions – our moral reasoning – develop as we grow up and become more aware of life in wider society. For example, our

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NFL offers players to scrap all preseason games

The NFL has offered to scrap all preseason games, a person familiar with the decision tells The Associated Press.

The players’ association had sought no preseason games and the league had reduced the exhibition schedule to two games. But on Monday evening, the NFL said it would eliminate those preseason contests and also would offer players 18 days for acclimation, up from seven days. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the offer has not been made public.

Another part of the offer is to provide a means for players concerned about participating in training camp and/or games to opt out and receive a stipend.

The union has not yet accepted the offers. Should it do so, both sides would have taken a major step toward starting the season on time.

Earlier Monday, the league said players will be tested daily for the coronavirus for at least the first

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Fauci says ‘divisiveness’ hurts response; Big Ten schools to only play league games; CDC won’t rewrite school rules

Florida saw an alarming increase in deaths and top federal health officials ran counter to President Donald Trump’s wishes, saying guidelines for reopening schools won’t be rewritten and some states should consider shutting down again as coronavirus cases spike nationwide Thursday.

The Big Ten announced it will limit its fall sports to only conference games, impacting several significant scheduled football games. The ACC pushed the start of its season back to Sept. 1.

Florida reported 120 deaths – almost 50% more than the previous one-day high of 83 in late April – as the state surpassed 4,000 deaths. Nationwide, the Johns Hopkins data dashboard reported a one-day total of 820 U.S. deaths and a near-record 58,601 new cases.

“Any state that is having a serious problem, that state should seriously look at shutting down,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on “The

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