Harvard

Harvard University grads connect pandemic response policies across borders

Hundal: I’ve been working as a freelance health journalist for over six years now. At the same time, I have a background as a public policy specialist advising on health care policies that support marginalized populations. So, when the pandemic took hold and quarantine mandates started to be initiated, I was looking at the situation through both of these lenses. … Our hope for a takeaway from this project is that health care leaders and legislators around the world can get a clearer picture, empirically, of what’s working and what is isn’t working to bring this pandemic to a close.

Q. How did you decide which nations to include and how did you reach the leaders?

Hundal: Typically, the leaders reach out to us. I bring to this project many years of experience in international development work. Over the course of that work, we’ve liaised with stakeholders in public service

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Harvard University Board Gains Backers of Fossil Fuel Divestment

An activist group of Harvard University alumni opposed to the fossil-fuel industry won three of the five seats on the college’s Board of Overseers up for election this year. The victory is part of the group’s campaign to force Harvard’s $40 billion endowment to end its investments in oil-and-gas companies.

The election results could embolden similar movements at other U.S. universities, which are increasingly deciding to pull their money out of fossil fuels. An organization at Yale University that is affiliated with the Harvard activists is running a candidate for a seat on its board of trustees to put pressure on the school’s roughly $30 billion endowment.

“This win proves that alumni want Harvard to be a leader in the fight against the climate crisis,” said Jayson Toweh, an Environmental Protection Agency program analyst and Harvard alumnus who won one of the seats, in a statement.

Harvard and Yale run

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How a Star Harvard Professor Got Suckered by ‘Jesus’ Wife’

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty/AP
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty/AP

In September 2012, late in the evening of the penultimate day of the 10th International Congress on Coptic Studies, academic luminary and Harvard Professor Karen King announced the discovery of a previously unknown early Christian text that she called the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife (GJW). King’s announcement made headlines around the world because one line of the fragment was said to read “Jesus said to them, ‘my wife…’” and then broke off. Was Jesus referring to his wife?

Though King herself never claimed that Jesus was married, the possibility that he was fed into Da Vinci Code hype about a married Messiah. Some were skeptical early on about its authenticity, but as scientific testing and academic analysis pulled the credibility of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife to pieces a new story emerged: one in which an amateur pornographer-turned-forger deceived an Ivy League professor and,

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Anti-Catholic Porn Producer Scammed Harvard Professor with Gospel of Jesus’ Wife

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty/AP
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty/AP

In September 2012, late in the evening of the penultimate day of the 10th International Congress on Coptic Studies, academic luminary and Harvard professor Karen King announced the discovery of a previously unknown early Christian text that she called the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife (GJW). King’s discovery made headlines around the world because one line of the fragment read “Jesus said to them, ‘my wife…’” and then broke off. Was Jesus referring to his wife?

Though King herself never claimed that Jesus was married, the possibility that he was fed into Da Vinci Code hype about a married Messiah. Some were skeptical early on about its authenticity, but even as scientific testing and academic analysis pulled the credibility of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife to pieces a new story emerged: one in which an amateur pornographer-turned-forger deceived an Ivy league professor and, briefly, the

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What Harvard MBA Virtual Admissions Events Are Like

It was the first virtual graduation in the history of Harvard Business School

The COVID-19 pandemic forced b-schools across the nation to shift their courses online back in March. And following suit, many in-person events and functions had to be canceled only to be brought back in a virtual state.

At Harvard Business School, two primary admissions programs – the Summer Venture in Management Program (SVMP) and Peek Weekend—went virtual this summer due to the pandemic. Despite the fact that attendees didn’t meet in-person, the virtual gatherings still saw great success, according to an article by the HBS Newsroom.

“One silver lining of the coronavirus pandemic is that it provided an opportunity to expand virtual admissions events beyond what we thought was possible,” Kate Bennett, director of marketing for MBA Admissions at HBS, tells Newsroom. “We were able to reach a far higher number of prospective students—an unprecedented number of

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How To Make Black Lives Matter At Harvard Business School

When I first heard that Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria had publicly apologized for the school’s numerous failures to the African-American community, I was both surprised by his personal confession of complicity and highly skeptical that the anti-Black culture that he had led for a decade would substantially improve. As a senior lecturer at the school for seven years from 2012 to 2019, I had been regularly lobbying Dean Nohria on Black issues. I would initiate meetings with him every year in the fall and spring, armed with my sheet of paper with “Black Agenda” handwritten on the top. I wrongfully assumed that a “man of color” would want to rid the school of its anti-Black racism. Boy, was I wrong! There was no progress.

And then, when I finally read his entire apology, I was outraged and glad that I had retired from the toxic anti-Black environment. The … Read More

It took her two hours to get to Beach High. But she’s now off to Harvard on a full ride

Heavyn Lee would start her day at 5 every morning to begin her journey to Miami Beach Senior High.

She would get up, take a swig of chocolate milk and run to catch the 183rd Local, the Miami-Dade bus that would take her from her Miami Gardens home through North Miami Beach, Skylake Mall and Biscayne Boulevard before making its final stop at Aventura Mall.

From there, she’d catch the county bus to Beach High, a two-hour journey to get to school by the 7:20 a.m. bell.

Getting home was even more difficult, as she had a two-and-a-half hour swim practice every day. And, in her junior and senior years, she took dual-enrollment courses at Miami Dade College, getting her home often past 10 p.m.

“My mother made education a priority, so I think it’s only appropriate that I follow suit,” said Heavyn, 18, who graduated from Beach High with

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Harvard is keeping classes online this fall, placing it among the 8% of US colleges planning to do so. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

  • Harvard University announced Monday that it will only conduct classes online for the coming academic year, though it will allow some students to live on campus.

  • Other universities and colleges across the US — including the country’s largest four-year public university system, California State University— are opting for online-only courses in the fall 2020 semester.

  • The coronavirus could resurge in the fall, bringing a new wave of infections.

  • Here are the schools that aren’t planning to return to campus this fall.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

Harvard announced

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Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

BOSTON (AP) — Colleges and universities pushed back Wednesday against the Trump administration’s decision to make international students leave the country if they plan on taking classes entirely online this fall, with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filing a lawsuit to try to block it, and others promising to work with students to keep them on campus.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement notified colleges Monday that international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of online and in-person classes will be barred from taking all of their classes online.

The guidance says international students won’t be exempt even if an outbreak forces their schools online during the fall term.

In a statement, the U.S. State

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