Health

Brandon Marshall talks potential NFL return, new business venture and health habits during career

Brandon Marshall hasn’t officially retired from the NFL, but the six-time Pro Bowl wide receiver has remained exceptionally busy since he last caught a NFL pass two years ago. Marshall, the new co-host of “First Things First,” also has launched the “House of Athlete” brand dedicated to to support and enhance physical and mental health for the everyday athlete.

Marshall is extremely passionate about “House of Athlete,” which redefines the standard approach to lifestyle wellness, giving athletes from all walks of life access to premium resources and tools. This week, “House of Athlete” launched a premium range of five all-natural fueling supplements (mental fitness, immunity, rest, whey protein, vegan protein) that are set in the brand’s core values. 

An eight-time 1,000-yard receiver, Marshall recorded 970 catches for 12,351 yards and 83 touchdowns in 13 seasons. He’s currently 16th all time in receptions, 22nd in receiving yards, and 22nd in touchdowns. 

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Sacramento health officials order Capital Christian to shut down for violating COVID-19 rules

Sacramento County health officials on Tuesday ordered Capital Christian School to stop on-campus instruction, saying the school was violating state and local coronavirus orders by claiming to be a day care center.

Under emergency orders issued by Gov. Gavin Newsom, Sacramento County schools are not yet allowed to open for in-class learning. Child care centers are, however, allowed to be open with restrictions.

Given those restrictions, Capital Christian Head of Schools Tim Wong told The Sacramento Bee the school used its elementary-school program as a model, in effect classifying the classroom as a day care session, allowing it to open.

Students returned to classrooms last week. Kindergarten through fifth-graders are required to attend in person, according to the school website. Older students and their families are allowed to choose whether to attend in person or to participate online from home.

Capital Christian is one of the largest private schools in

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‘Emotional support K-pop boys’ help fans with their mental health

‘Emotional support K-pop boys’ help fans with their mental health
‘Emotional support K-pop boys’ help fans with their mental health

“Every time I see him I feel like the sun is shining on my face.”

L. Gissele has three emotional support K-pop boys: Kim Namjoon aka RM from BTS, Bang Chan from Stray Kids, and Johnny Suh from NCT 127.

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“[Namjoon’s] words speak to me and he motivates me to always do better and to aim big. To always challenge myself,” the 18-year-old Panamanian told Mashable via DM. “[Chan] has been there for me at my lowest point in life. He makes me remember that depression does not define me and that I can get through everything.”

And Johnny? “Seeing him smile makes me happy.”

Feeling a strong attachment to or drawing strength from a specific idol isn’t unusual in K-pop fandom. Commonly called “emotional support K-pop boys,” these artists inspire and reassure people through their music, livestreams,

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NHS braces for increased demand for mental health support in wake of coronavirus pandemic

The country has undergone many changes as it tackles the pandemic - REUTERS/Simon Dawson
The country has undergone many changes as it tackles the pandemic – REUTERS/Simon Dawson

More health staff are being trained to treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder in preparation for a potential spike in demand for mental health services after the coronavirus crisis.

Almost 3,000 trainees are expected to start courses in psychological therapies and former staff are also being asked to consider returning to frontline roles in preparation for growing numbers of people suffering from anxiety and depression and related conditions.

NHS England said it hoped to boost the number of advanced clinical practitioners, psychiatrists and mental health nurses over the next few months.

As part of the NHS People Plan this includes up to 300 peer-support workers, more than 100 responsible clinicians, 50 community-based specialist mental health pharmacists and 245 children and young people’s psychological wellbeing practitioners.

Around 2,900 trainees – which NHS England said was a record

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Health directors told to keep quiet as Florida leaders pressed to reopen classrooms

PALM BEACH, Fla. – As Gov. Ron DeSantis pushed this summer for schools to reopen, state leaders told school boards they would need Health Department approval if they wanted to keep classrooms closed.

Then they instructed health directors not to give it.

Following a directive from DeSantis’ administration, county health directors across Florida refused to give school boards advice about one of the most wrenching public health decisions in modern history: whether to reopen schools in a worsening pandemic, a USA TODAY Network review found.

In county after county, the health directors’ refrain to school leaders was the same: Their role was to provide information, not recommendations.

They could not tell school boards whether they believed the risks of opening campuses were too great, they said. They could only provide suggestions on how to reopen safely.

“I don’t think any of us are in a position to balk the governor,”

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic closed campuses this spring compared with fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in 2017 that they had

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College students face financial strains, health concerns from pandemic ahead of fall semester

Brittany Goddard’s final semester at Howard University isn’t the dream ending she imagined in Washington, D.C. 

When the coronavirus pandemic shut down the U.S. economy in March, she scrambled to pack up her belongings since she had to be out of her dorm room within 48 hours. At the same time, she lost her part-time job at a catering company and still hasn’t received unemployment after filing for jobless benefits in April. 

She was set to study abroad in Barcelona over the summer, but those plans were upended due to the pandemic. And with just weeks to go before the fall semester begins, she’s worried about how she’ll pay the remaining balance of her tuition and fees – roughly $9,000 – since her financial aid won’t cover it at the private school.

“It’s heartbreaking. I’m a low-income student. I can’t afford tuition,” Goddard, 20, says, who’s created a GoFundMe page

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As the president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances, and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic caused the closure of campuses this spring compared to fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in

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8 Back-to-School Mental Health Resources for BIPOC Students

Student sitting cross-legged with an open laptop in her lap against a pink background
Student sitting cross-legged with an open laptop in her lap against a pink background

Many parents and children are looking forward to back-to-school season and easing into a regular schedule once again. Student mental health was already a growing concern before COVID-19. Depression among adolescents in the U.S. has been increasing steadily over the years.

BIPOC students particularly may experience more negative circumstances such as racial/ethnic discrimination, marginalization, and lack of access to resources and services that contribute negatively to their mental health. There are many online resources that can help BIPOC students manage their mental health as back-to-school season begins.

Here are eight back-to-school mental health resources for BIPOC students:

The Steve Fund is an organization dedicated to supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. The Fund works with colleges and universities, nonprofits, researchers, mental health experts, families, and young people to promote programs

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Florida health directors reportedly told not to say whether schools should reopen

County health directors in Florida have reportedly been told not to provide a recommendation about whether schools should reopen during the coronavirus pandemic.

Florida state officials “instructed county directors to focus their advice to school boards on how best to reopen,” but the health directors have been told “not to make a recommendation” about whether to actually reopen at all, The Palm Beach Post reports. This is despite the fact that an edict from Florida Education Commission Richard Corcoran instructed schools seeking to not reopen to receive a wavier from health officials.

“We’ve been advised that our role here is to just advise as to what can we do to make the environment in schools as safe as possible with COVID-19,” one health director, Patricia Boswell, reportedly said at a school board meeting. “It is not to make a decision on whether or not to open the school.”

Former health

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