helped

The story behind the widely-shared photo of a bikini-clad doctor who helped a patient on the brink of death

Dr. Candice Myhre reenacts the time she treated a patient with life-threatening injuries that she encountered while surfing.
Dr. Candice Myhre reenacts the time she treated a patient with life-threatening injuries that she encountered while surfing.

Dr. Candice Myhre

  • An image of emergency medical physician Dr. Candice Myhre treating a bloody and injured patient has been widely-shared online in the past week.

  • The striking photo is a reenactment of a time when Myhre was surfing and witnessed a woman get hit by a 24-foot boat. She sprung into action to save her.

  • Myhre’s photo gained renewed attention in the wake of a controversial study that called female doctors “unprofessional” for wearing bikinis.

  • The study sparked a conversation about sexism in medicine, with doctors posting bikini photos and the tag #MedBikini.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Photos of an emergency medicine doctor treating a bloodied patient while wearing a bikini swept social media last week.

In the images, Hawaii-based Dr. Candice Myhre, who also goes by “Dr. Bikini,”

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TV ‘trailblazer’ Ed Ansin, who helped change the flavor of news, dies in Miami at 84

A leader. A philanthropist. And a trailblazer who changed the television news industry forever.

Those are the words anchors, reporters and producers are using to describe Ed Ansin, owner of South Florida’s WSVN-Channel 7 in Miami. Ansin died Sunday at 84.

“Far from a hands off owner, Ed Ansin walked through the doors of WSVN-TV every day … He was a true leader, not just by title, but by example,” WSVN said in a statement on its website. “Ansin told the Boston Globe, ‘I want to die with my boots on,’ and that’s what he did. Ansin was in the office just this past Friday still doing what he loved.”

WSVN news anchor Alex De Armas wrote on Instagram that they had recently walked out of the station together and had their regular conversation about lunch. He was going to have Oggi, his “usual.”

11/2/98 Al Diaz/Herald staff--Ed Ansin and son James at the Channel 7 studio.
11/2/98 Al Diaz/Herald staff–Ed Ansin and
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How an Arizona couple helped fuel a Wayfair sex trafficking conspiracy theory

A screencap from Maddie and Justin Thompson's 40-minute Instagram Live video posted on July 10. The couple reveals that they bought a desk that cost at least $17,000 from Wayfair to see whether they would receive "grooming calls" from the company amid a viral conspiracy theory that the website is used to traffic children.
A screencap from Maddie and Justin Thompson’s 40-minute Instagram Live video posted on July 10. The couple reveals that they bought a desk that cost at least $17,000 from Wayfair to see whether they would receive “grooming calls” from the company amid a viral conspiracy theory that the website is used to traffic children.

PHOENIX — Last weekend, an unsubstantiated conspiracy theory that online furnishings retailer Wayfair is trafficking children through listings of products with inflated prices and human names erupted on social media.

An Arizona couple helped fuel the rumor by posting on Instagram that they had purchased a $17,000 desk from Wayfair and would share their experience with their followers.

The theory that pillows and cabinets being sold at wayfair.com for thousands of dollars is somehow evidence of a child trafficking scheme has been debunked by independent fact-checking publication Snopes. It gained traction through a July 9 Reddit

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