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Here’s how to stay safe in the water, according to a former lifeguard

According to the CDC, an average of 3,536 people unintentionally drown every year — that’s roughly ten per day.

As a former lifeguard, swim and CPR instructor, I’ve been schooled in the nuances of water safety. Here’s what you need to know to keep your family safe at the lake, beach, and pool this summer.

What does drowning look like?

Unlike what you might see on TV, drowning may not involve screams, thrashing or hand signals. Look for a weak or inefficient kick, attempts to reach for the edge, and neutral or negative buoyancy.

What can you do if you think someone may be drowning? Experts recommend throwing anything that floats to the person. It could be a life jacket, swim noodle, or even an empty cooler with the top closed. 

“This is why ocean lifeguards use rescue buoys and tubes,” explains B. Chris Brewster, Chair of the National Certification

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My Brother Died Of An Overdose. Here’s What I Wish I’d Known That Could Have Saved Him.

The author with her new baby brother in the late '80s (Photo: Courtesy of Jess Keefe)
The author with her new baby brother in the late ’80s (Photo: Courtesy of Jess Keefe)

The evening my brother died was crisp but warm, early October. It was a regular day. People are always struck by the ordinariness of the circumstances when something bad happens.

Matt self-medicated with substances for years before it turned into a full-blown heroin addiction. It started with pill-popping at parties, then morphed into stockpiling syringes in a Café Bustelo can.

When I think back to that October evening, there’s an alternative version of events that I often indulge in. In this version, I still come home to the apartment we shared and find my brother overdosing in his bedroom, his skin blue like it’s covered in crepe paper, his mouth ajar yet unbreathing.

But this time, I don’t stumble and scream. Instead, I calmly uncap a dose of naloxone, the one I always keep

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Kids’ mental health can struggle during online school. Here’s how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

But Green, 18, also found herself working harder for the teachers who knew her well and cared about her. 

“My school doesn’t do a ton of lessons on social and emotional learning,” said Green, who just graduated from Charleston County School of the Arts, a magnet school, and is headed to Stanford University. “But I grew up in this creative writing program, and I’m really close to my teachers there, and we had at least one purposeful conversation about my emotions after we moved online.”

From the other teachers, Green didn’t hear much to support her mental health.

This was a common complaint among parents when classes went online in March to

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Teen influencer Danielle Cohn spoke openly about her abortion after becoming embroiled in controversy. Here’s how the social media star rose to prominence online.

Danielle Cohn
Danielle Cohn

Albert L. Ortega/Getty Images

  • Influencer and musician Danielle Cohn, who boasts 18.2 million TikTok followers and 1.8 million YouTube subscribers, has become an online sensation thanks to her lip-syncing videos and controversial social media presence.

  • Since the social media star rose to prominence in 2016, fans and critics have speculated about her age and expressed concern about her sexualized social media presence.

  • Cohn made headlines in July when she made a video addressing a leaked audio clip that revealed that she had an abortion earlier this year.

  • Since posting the video, Cohn has received support from fans who “respected” her decision and transparency, but others remained concerned about her age and relationships.

  • Cohn’s mother, Jennifer Archambault, has described the situation as “painful,” and she hopes her daughter can heal out of the spotlight.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

With 18.2 million TikTok followers, 4.7 million Instagram followers,

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Here’s What’s Still Open for Business in Hollywood

Editor’s note: The list is constantly updated. Dates refer to when announcements were made, or when an event is scheduled to happen.

You’ve probably seen our other COVID-19 list, the one where we are examining every cancellation that has taken place as the pandemic takes hold in our community. This is the counterpoint to that “Houston, we have a problem” list; this is the one where we’ll talk about how the show must go on, how the Force will be with us, and, maybe most importantly, how we’ll be back.

IndieWire will continue to update this page with the latest breaking news regarding virtual events, work logistics, TV premieres, and general acts of bravery and kindness. This is the place where we’ll be documenting our return to normalcy — and make no mistake, we’ll get through this. The most recent updates will be posted at the top of the running … Read More

Here’s What the Science Actually Says About Kids and COVID-19

Benjamin Knorr, a 40-year-old single father in Janesville, Wisc., says there’s about a 50-50 chance he’ll send his two teenage sons back to school this fall. His 13-year-old, Aiden, would especially like to get back to his friends, sports, and regular life. But Knorr, an independent contractor, has asthma, and fears that his health and finances would be imperiled if one of his boys brought COVID-19 home from school.

“If the numbers go up in Dane County and Rock County, where I work and live, it’s over. We’re just doing the online school,” Knorr says. “We already got through two months of it, and yeah, it was hard. It was stressful. And yeah, it was more work on my part to come home and do the online schooling with them and stuff. But we can’t be homeless.”

As school districts across the United States decide whether to welcome kids back

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Here’s How to Make Schools Safer for Reopening in the Fall

(Bloomberg Opinion) — During the weekend, the New York Times highlighted some of the comments it has received in reaction to articles about reopening schools. They were not a cause for optimism.

“Despite all my love for my students, I don’t really want to die for them or anyone else. Neither does my partner, who is living with cancer,” a teacher from Minneapolis wrote.

“Of course we need to reopen schools,” said a teacher from Maine, who then asked whether school nurses would be responsible for all the coronavirus testing that would be needed and where the schools would get enough personal protective equipment. “How many teachers receive combat pay while being forced into mortal heroics?” he added.

A parent from Massachusetts: “Does my daughter want to go back to the classroom? Yes. Do I prefer that she does? Yes. Do I want to risk her health in order for

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I’m a former CIA analyst trained to spot fake news. Here’s how you can do it, too.

In early 2017, I watched from my desk at the CIA as the world learned Russia had waged an influence campaign targeting the U.S. presidential election months before. As an intelligence analyst, I worked in a world where countries often used covert action against each other to influence events, outcomes, and policies, but the scale and scope of Russia’s actions to try to help Donald Trump elected were unprecedented. As the Intelligence Community’s declassified assessment from 2017 stated, Russia’s interference was “a significant escalation” in the country’s long-running effort to undermine the United States. 

Since then, I have seen this revelation lead to a (mostly) collective panic, but essentially no government action. That panic has manifested in a growing distrust of institutions we traditionally counted on for information, like the media, fear that social media conversations are orchestrated by “Russian bots,” the mainstreaming of conspiracy theories, and in the most

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New scam demands victims stay on the phone: Here’s how it works

Red flags of a scam tend to be similar. The scammer will try new tricks, but typically create a sense of urgency, either playing into our fear, greed or desire to be loved. They’ll romance us, threaten us, frighten us or pretend to offer a quick fix to a problem we didn’t even know we had. 

And now, increasingly, they’re demanding that victims stay on the phone as long as possible while consumers head to the bank or the grocery store to carry out demands for money via money transfers or gift cards. 

Scammers are telling their victims that that if they hang up, they’re likely to be arrested immediately or see their accounts seized. 

“This is an alarming development, because consumers are essentially being held captive in the scam,” according to a new 2019 Consumer Complaint Survey released by the Consumer Federation of America on Monday.

“If bank tellers

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Here’s how to help your student

Hoping to help your third-grader with reading and writing skills? Here are some basic tips that experts suggest.

Make the most of your library

By now your child should have a library card and be familiar with your local library. Encourage them to develop their own taste in reading and to borrow books that interest her. Make sure that they have time at home, away from computers and television, to focus on reading independently.

Use technology as a reading tool

Learn how to use technology to help develop your third-grader’s growing interest in reading. There is a large selection of online books for children, many with interactive features such as animations or voice recording. You can also encourage their interest in reading by helping their find online sites about topics that interest her.

Include non-fiction books

Make sure to incorporate non-fiction books into your child’s reading list, such as books

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