high

The Economic Model of High Education Was Already Broken

With the fall semester upon us, colleges and universities unveiled their plans for students—and many are just as quickly upending those plans. The University of North Carolina and Notre Dame recently announced they were changing their on campus plans as COVID-19 cases spiked. Many other universities are sure to follow. Already, universities ranging from Syracuse to Ohio State are suspending hundreds of students for violating social distancing rules, while COVID-19 outbreaks are on the rise on campuses such as the University of Alabama. While there is considerable variety in the actual plans, ranging from mostly in-person to all virtual, they all share one imperative: to maintain an economic model that is as imperiled by the pandemic as the hardest hit service industries.

Over the past decade, colleges and universities have taken on staggering amounts of debt to expand their physical plant and justify spiraling fees. The selling point for

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Debris From Kepler’s Supernova Still Traveling At High Speeds After 400 Years

KEY POINTS

  • Kepler’s supernova remnants still moving at high speeds 400 years after the explosion
  • The remnants are moving at speeds of 20 million miles per hour
  • That’s 25,000 times faster than the speed of sound on Earth

Astronomers have found that the debris from a supernova blast is still moving at extremely high speeds some 400 years after the blast was first observed from Earth.

It was in 1604 that early astronomers, including Johannes Kepler, first observed the supernova explosion we now know as Kepler’s Supernova, some 20,000 light years away in the Milky Way. At the time, its greatest apparent magnitude was about -2.5, making it brighter than Jupiter. But by 1606, it was no longer visible to the naked eye.

Today, astronomers still get to observe the phenomenon through advanced means such as NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

In a recent study published in The Astrophysical Journal, astronomers

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Nursing home cases hit new high; UNC Chapel Hill reverts to online classes

The coronavirus is hitting hard again in nursing homes, with the number of new infections climbing to a weekly high, according to a new report.

Most of the new cases are in Sunbelt states.

Showing again the virus does not discriminate between the old and the young, one of the first major universities to welcome students back on campus, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is reversing course after outbreaks of the coronavirus and going to online classes only.

The experience at UNC could serve as an early warning sign for other campuses around the country as they contemplate reopening classes.

It’s not just classes that are a problem but socializing, President Donald Trump’s top expert said Monday. Dr. Deborah Birx, on Monday said families and friends holding parties are a big cause of outbreaks.

On the national front, Speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling back the House to

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COVID-19 puts our children at high risk of long-term hardship

We as governors — along with decision makers in state legislatures, school boards, workforce boards, and city and county governments — assess each day the growing damage of COVID-19 to our economic, educational, social and health care systems. We are especially concerned about the millions of young Americans who have been away from school for many weeks and graduating seniors who seek to enter the workforce and higher education. 

The latest national data highlights the growing risk that we may lose a critical part of our next generation. 

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell noted that 40% of all households earning $40,000 or less lost their jobs in March. Further, recent surveys of teachers reveal increases in truancy (27%) and dramatic declines in student engagement — up to 50% or higher in some cases, especially among poor and vulnerable youth, as the school year came to a close.

We are honored

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15 Chicago high schools have voted to keep their school resource officers, despite protest movement against police in CPS buildings

At least three Chicago high schools have voted to discontinue having resource officers from the Chicago Police Department — but at least 15 more have decided to keep their officers, and dozens of others have yet to decide.

Chicago Public Schools released a list on its website this week for tracking the votes by Local School Councils on school-based police officers following requests for greater transparency on the process.

So far, Benito Juarez Community Academy in Pilsen and Northside College Prep in North Park have voted to eliminate resource officers, as has Robert Clemente Community Academy in West Town, though that’s not yet updated on the website.

Amundsen, Douglass, Kenwood, King and Marshall are among the schools whose councils have voted to retain the officers, and several more votes were scheduled for Tuesday.

The new list debuted as a parent advocacy group has called into question the legitimacy of the

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Which Country Gets High Marks for Reopening Schools?

Carl Court/Getty
Carl Court/Getty

As American school officials debate when it will be safe for schoolchildren to return to classrooms, looking abroad may offer insights. Nearly every country in the world shuttered their schools early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Many have since sent students back to class, with varying degrees of success.

I am a scholar of comparative international education. For this article, I examined what happened in four countries where K-12 schools either stayed open throughout the pandemic or have resumed in-person instruction, using press reports, national COVID-19 data and academic studies.

Here’s what I found.

Israel: Too much, too soon

Israel took stringent steps early on in the coronavirus pandemic, including severely restricting everyone’s movement and closing all schools. By June, it was being lauded internationally for containing the spread of COVID-19.

But shortly after schools reopened in May, on a staggered schedule paired with mask mandates and social distancing

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What to do on Friday nights this fall without high school football

Denzel Washington tackles the 2000 role of coach Herman Boone in "Remember the Titans." <span class="copyright">(Tracy Bennett / Buena Vista Pictures)</span>
Denzel Washington tackles the 2000 role of coach Herman Boone in “Remember the Titans.” (Tracy Bennett / Buena Vista Pictures)

With the CIF deciding to delay the start of the high school football season until Jan. 8 because of uncertainty and safety concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic, teens and their families are going to need to find a substitute plan for what to do on Friday nights this fall.

Let’s call it “Friday Night Lights” revised.

Among the possible alternatives:

A TV classic. Subscribe to Hulu and watch all five seasons of the TV series “Friday Night Lights.”

A film classic. Make Friday night a family night to watch your favorite sports movie. Here are a few to get you started: “Blindside,” “Remember the Titans,” “Hoosiers,” “Mighty Ducks,” “Field of Dreams.”

A little football. You may be able to stream seven-on-seven football games from your nearest park.

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What to do on Friday nights this fall without high school football?

Denzel Washington tackled the 2000 role of coach Herman Boone in "Remember the Titans." <span class="copyright">(Tracy Bennett / Buena Vista Pictures)</span>
Denzel Washington tackled the 2000 role of coach Herman Boone in “Remember the Titans.” (Tracy Bennett / Buena Vista Pictures)

With the CIF deciding to delay the start of the high school football season until Jan. 8 because of uncertainty and safety concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic, families are going to need to find a substitute plan for what to do on Friday nights this fall.

Let’s call it Friday Night Lights revised.

Among the possible alternatives:

• Subscribe to Hulu and watch all five seasons of the TV series, “Friday Night Lights.”

• Make Friday night a family night to watch your favorite sports movie. The candidates: “Blindside”; “Remember the Titans”; “Hoosiers”; “Mighty Ducks”; “Field of Dreams.”

• Stream seven-on-seven football games from your nearest park. By October and November, if county health departments give approval, seven-on-seven passing competitions could be possible.

• Friday night barbecue. Yes, get some

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California high school sports forced into three-month delay

The coronavirus pandemic prompted California to spike all fall high school sports on Monday, in favor of a new calendar that will compact all games, like football, into a few winter and spring months.

The California Interscholastic Federation, which regulates high school sports, won’t stage any games in any sports until at least December, officials said.

The new calendar would mean football — a staple of fall Friday nights across America’s largest state — would be played in the spring with the last game played no later than April 17, 2021, the CIF announced.

CIF Southern Section Commissioner Rob Wigod admitted the calendar is not ideal. But because so many California schools have said they’re going to start the fall term with just online instruction, this was the only option short of canceling whole seasons.

“The alternative would be to just cancel an entire season or seasons, In other words,

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High Water” Co-Stars and Other Celebrities Remember Naya Rivera

Photo credit: FOX - Getty Images
Photo credit: FOX – Getty Images

From Seventeen

Naya Rivera’s family and friends are mourning her death after her body was found at Lake Piru, where she disappeared several days before.

According to officials, the actress accidentally drowned after going out swimming with her son, Josey. “She mustered enough energy to get her son back onto the boat, but not enough to save herself,” Ventura County Sheriff Bill Ayub said, according to CNN.

The actress was only 33 at the time of her death and was starring in the YouTube original series Step Up: High Water. The series was announced to move to Starz with the next season, which was set to start filming after restrictions were lifted. Rivera is also well known for her role as Santana Lopez on Glee. She first started her career as a child actress with roles on Full House and Family

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