ICE

ICE bans international students from entering U.S. for online classes

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced on Friday that international students who plan to solely enroll in online classes this fall will be barred from entering the country. The announcement came as the U.S. topped 4 million coronavirus cases and as colleges and universities roll out plans to shift to online learning for the fall semester.

“Nonimmigrant students in new or initial status after March 9 will not be able to enter the U.S. to enroll in a U.S. school as a nonimmigrant student for the fall term to pursue a full course of study that is 100 percent online,” ICE said in its press release.

The department also mandated that designated school officials are not to provide new international students with an I-20 form that declares their legal student status. This guidance includes new international students who are outside of the U.S. and want to take online-only classes

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ICE Backtracks, Allows Foreign Students To Study Online In The U.S.

Thousands of international students are breathing a sigh of relief and fall planning is back on track for colleges after the Trump administration walked back a rule that would have barred foreign students in the U.S. from taking all their classes online.

“It’s really good to have the confirmation and have that backing that even if I were to do online classes, I would not have to leave the country,” said Christian Jackson, a Malaysian student at Drake University in Iowa.

“I can finally stop thinking of all other options and just, like, keep going, moving on with my life,” said Natalia Marques, a Brazilian student at Sonoma State University in Northern California.

The White House reversal came after 19 states and scores of universities sued the government over the plan to require foreign students to take in-person classes or face deportation.

Colleges argued that forcing international students to go

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ICE rescinds order that would’ve affected at least 10,000 South Florida foreign students

The Trump administration rescinded Tuesday an immigration order that would have forced more than 10,000 international students in South Florida and at least a million nationwide to attend classes in person during the pandemic this fall — or face deportation.

Foreign students with an F-1 or M-1 student visa would have been required to take at least one in-person class to maintain their legal status. If their school planned to offer only online classes in the fall due to the surge of COVID-19 cases, as Harvard University has said it will do, the students would have had to transfer to another school, not be allowed into the country or be deported.

The directive, announced by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on July 6, caused upheaval in higher education. The president of Harvard, which announced on July 6 that all of its undergraduate courses would be taught remotely, called the measure

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Universities scramble to protect students from deportation under new ICE policy requiring in-person classes

The Trump administration has thrown colleges and universities across the country into confusion this week with the unexpected announcement that international students will have to leave the U.S. if their school does not offer in-person classes during the upcoming semester. 

In a press release Monday afternoon, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that, under a forthcoming temporary rule, foreign students currently attending a school that plans to operate entirely online during the fall semester will either have to transfer to a different school offering in-person classes, leave the country voluntarily or face possible deportation.

In addition, ICE said the State Department “will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States.”

Under normal circumstances, the U.S. does not grant student visas to people enrolled in online-only

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ICE says students taking ‘hybrid’ classes may be able to stay in the US, but it won’t tell colleges what that means

Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.
Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.

Facebook/NYU

  • New guidelines from ICE prevent international students on certain visas from attending schools that are fully online, but may allow them to remain if they’re taking a mixture of online and in-person classes.

  • Many universities have announced they will use a “hybrid model,” combining both in-person and online courses for the upcoming academic year.

  • With “very little information” included in the announcement, however, the new policy lacks clarity in what may be required for a hybrid model, a Senior Legislative and Advocacy Counsel at ACLU told Business Insider.

  • A number of faculty have spoken out on social media that they will offer “1-unit in-person study with any student that faces removal from the country” due to the new policy. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Universities have

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ICE Says Foreign Students Need To Leave If Their Classes Are Online-Only

ICE is warning international students that they need to transfer or leave the U.S. if their school is only holding online courses

As the coronavirus pandemic continues, U.S. colleges and universities are now facing a big decision: Whether to hold in-person classes in the fall, or ask students to continue virtual learning to promote better the kind of social distancing that can be difficult on campus. Some schools, like Harvard, have already announced that their classes will be online-only for the coming academic year. For international students at those institutions, ICE has an ominous message: Transfer to a school with in-person classes, or leave the U.S.

Students on F-1 and M-1 visas that allow them to study in the U.S. who attend school that are offering only online classes “must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful

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Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

BOSTON (AP) — Colleges and universities pushed back Wednesday against the Trump administration’s decision to make international students leave the country if they plan on taking classes entirely online this fall, with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filing a lawsuit to try to block it, and others promising to work with students to keep them on campus.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement notified colleges Monday that international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of online and in-person classes will be barred from taking all of their classes online.

The guidance says international students won’t be exempt even if an outbreak forces their schools online during the fall term.

In a statement, the U.S. State

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ICE order leaves foreign students helpless

A new federal immigration directive that threatens the deportation of international college students who take all of their classes online this fall left Florida college administrators scrambling and students panicking about their futures.

The directive issued Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says all students with F-1 or M-1 student visas in the U.S. must go back to their home countries if their courses are entirely online in the fall, a measure many colleges and universities are adopting due to the spread of the coronavirus. Harvard University announced Monday that all of its teaching will be done remotely for the fall semester

The measure is expected to impact at least 1 million students nationwide and more than 10,000 students in the South Florida region, according to ICE officials, local university statistics and College Factual, a New York-based company that gathers college data from the Department of Education.

International students,

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College students on visas fret over ICE ruling that could force them out of US

When University of Southern California student Mage Zhang spent more than $5,000 for a flight home to China in late May, she packed all her belongings and thought this could be a trip of no return.

President Donald Trump administration’s new rule on international students confirmed her worries.

Issued by Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Monday, the new regulation says international students attending colleges in the U.S. cannot stay in the country if their classes are held fully online and not in a classroom.

In a provost letter to students on July 1, USC announced undergraduates will be “primarily or exclusively” taking classes online in the fall term. Zhang said she didn’t expect to return to campus before November.

“The risks and expenses are too high for a returning trip to the U.S., and I’d rather take online classes at home,” said Zhang, who will be a senior this year.

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