indoors

Two top CDC officials step down; Birx urges Americans to wear masks indoors and outdoors

Two top officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were moving on and angry Democrats were calling out the U.S. Postal Service leadership Sunday as the U.S. COVID-19 death toll that inched toward 170,000.

Kyle McGowan, the chief of staff, and Amanda Campbell, the deputy chief of staff, had worked side-by-side with CDC Director Robert Redfield, including the last eight tumultuous months as the virus overwhelmed the nation.

“Amanda and I spent more than two years serving at the CDC and chose to leave to start our own business,” McGowan said in a statement emailed to USA TODAY.

A sliver of help may be on the way for the relentless coronavirus testing issues hampering efforts to slow the U.S. outbreak. This weekend the Food and Drug Administration approved a saliva-based test that Yale University researchers hope will clean up some of those testing issues.

“This is a huge

Read More

New saliva test a ‘huge step forward’; Birx urges Americans to wear masks indoors and outdoors

A sliver of help may be on the way for the relentless coronavirus testing issues hampering efforts to slow a U.S. death toll that inched toward 170,000 on Sunday.

The average number of daily tests across the nation has begun to fall, according to the COVID Tracking  Project. Delays sometimes stretching to a week or more in obtaining test results have severely disrupted efforts at contact tracing. And when results are finally obtained, accuracy issues have often delayed proper treatment.

This weekend, however, the Food and Drug Administration approved a saliva-based test that Yale University researchers hope will clean up some of those testing issues.

“This is a huge step forward to make testing more accessible,” said Chantal Vogels, a Yale postdoctoral fellow, who led the laboratory development and validation along with Doug Brackney, an adjunct assistant clinical professor. 

Here are some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has 

Read More

How to use ventilation and air filtration to prevent the spread of coronavirus indoors

<span class="caption">Open windows are the simplest way to increase air flow in a room.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/man-with-mask-looking-out-of-window-royalty-free-image/1215148858?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Justin Paget / Digital Vision via Getty Images"> Justin Paget / Digital Vision via Getty Images</a></span>
Open windows are the simplest way to increase air flow in a room. Justin Paget / Digital Vision via Getty Images

The vast majority of SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs indoors, most of it from the inhalation of airborne particles that contain the coronavirus. The best way to prevent the virus from spreading in a home or business would be to simply keep infected people away. But this is hard to do when an estimated 40% of cases are asymptomatic and asymptomatic people can still spread the coronavirus to others.

Masks do a decent job at keeping the virus from spreading into the environment, but if an infected person is inside a building, inevitably some virus will escape into the air.

I am a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder. Much of my work has focused on how to control the transmission of airborne infectious diseases indoors, and

Read More