international

International Influencer Yi Zhou on Her Career as an Artist, Entrepreneur and Filmmaker

Born in Shanghai, raised in Rome and educated in London and Paris, Yi Zhou is more than just your average social media influencer. Despite having Tommy Hilfiger as a mentor and working with major brands such as Chanel, Levi Strauss & Co. and Shiseido, Zhou is most well known for her career as a multimedia artist. Her installations and short films have been featured at Shanghai Biennale, Venice Biennale, Sundance Film Festival and the Cannes Film Festival.

In addition to her artistic talents, Zhou is also a successful entrepreneur. After relocating to China in 2010, she founded the brand management and content creation company YiZhouStudio in Shanghai and Hong Kong. In 2017, Zhou brought the company to Los Angeles and in the same year also founded a new fashion and lifestyle brand, Global Intuition, which debuted at Fred Segal in 2019.

In addition to growing her fashion line, Zhou is

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ICE bans international students from entering U.S. for online classes

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced on Friday that international students who plan to solely enroll in online classes this fall will be barred from entering the country. The announcement came as the U.S. topped 4 million coronavirus cases and as colleges and universities roll out plans to shift to online learning for the fall semester.

“Nonimmigrant students in new or initial status after March 9 will not be able to enter the U.S. to enroll in a U.S. school as a nonimmigrant student for the fall term to pursue a full course of study that is 100 percent online,” ICE said in its press release.

The department also mandated that designated school officials are not to provide new international students with an I-20 form that declares their legal student status. This guidance includes new international students who are outside of the U.S. and want to take online-only classes

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Loss of international students could damage US economy, experts say

The world of higher education, already struggling to cope amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was rocked last week when the Trump administration issued a regulation that would prevent international students from entering the country in addition to compelling thousands already in the U.S. to leave if enrolled in schools that plan to teach exclusively online in the fall.

“These students and their families have invested so much hope and money — in some cases, their families’ life savings — to get an American education,” Kavita Daiya, an associate professor of English at George Washington University, told ABC News. “By being here, they bring so much talent and knowledge to our communities. To force them to leave is to betray the promise of opportunity and fairness that undergirds American higher education.”

Implementation of the order could cost the U.S. tens of billions of dollars and thousands of jobs, but on Tuesday the

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Trump administration rescinds international student policy for online classes in stunning u-turn

Harvard University is planning to teach classes largely online in the 2020 fall semester: AP
Harvard University is planning to teach classes largely online in the 2020 fall semester: AP

Donald Trump’s administration has abandoned its plan to rescind certain visas for foreign college students whose universities would be moving to online-only courses.

Several universities and attorneys general in 18 states as well as Washington DC had sued the administration over the policy, announced earlier this month.

Under the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) guidelines, which have been scrapped, for now, foreign students whose courses were moved online amid the coronavirus pandemic would have to leave the country. It instructed students on F-1 and M-1 visas to “depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status.”

The administration reached a settlement on Tuesday, a week after the guidance was issued, that reinstates an earlier policy allowing foreign students to legally remain in the

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Trump administration reverses new visa guidelines for international students

The Trump administration walked back a sudden policy change that would have potentially blocked hundreds of thousands of international student from remaining in or returning to the U.S. while pressuring universities to resume in-person classes in the fall amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Following a week-long fight by Harvard, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and more than a dozen state attorneys general, the government has agreed on Tuesday to “rescind” a policy that would have affected international students who are attending institutions that have opted to go completely remote over the fall.

“For the hundreds of thousands of international students across this country who enrich our institutions and strengthen our communities – we celebrate this victory with you,” Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey said in a statement. “This ICE rule was senseless and illegal the minute it came out, and the Trump Administration knew it didn’t have a

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Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

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Teladoc Health, Zoom Video Communications, Amazon, Costco Wholesale and Fiverr International

For Immediate Release

Chicago, IL – July 13, 2020 – Zacks.com announces the list of stocks featured in the Analyst Blog. Every day the Zacks Equity Research analysts discuss the latest news and events impacting stocks and the financial markets. Stocks recently featured in the blog include: Teladoc Health, Inc. TDOC, Zoom Video Communications, Inc. ZM, Amazon AMZN, Costco Wholesale COST and Fiverr International FVRR.

Here are highlights from Friday’s Analyst Blog:

Investing in the “New Normal”: 3 Major Trends That Are Here to Stay

With the recent relaxation of lockdown guidelines followed by mass reopening of a number of states, the nation’s daily new case tally is on the rise again. The last three months’ data had shown a slowdown in new cases, bringing a glimmer of hope. However, the past seven days’ data shows a record increase in the number of new cases.

The catastrophic impact of the

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Urgent deadline approaches for international college students fighting to stay in U.S.

California's three public university systems are fighting federal immigration orders that could force international students at UCLA, above, and other campuses to leave the country. <span class="copyright">(Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times)</span>
California’s three public university systems are fighting federal immigration orders that could force international students at UCLA, above, and other campuses to leave the country. (Glenn Koenig/Los Angeles Times)

With an urgent deadline approaching Wednesday, the collective force of California’s three public systems of higher education, which educate nearly 3 million students, have joined the legal fight to stop federal immigration authorities from banning international students from the U.S. if they take only online courses this fall.

Two separate lawsuits by the University of California and state Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra with California State University and California Community Colleges have put the nation’s premier public research university and the two largest public higher education systems behind the effort to stop the federal order.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a July 6 directive that requires international students taking only online classes to leave the country and bans visas from being

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Fate Of Thousands Of International College Students In CT Unclear

NEW HAVEN, CT —Some 14,000 international students were enrolled in Connecticut colleges in 2019. It was announced by the Trump Administration last week that those students must attend in-person classes or risk losing their visas.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) ordered Monday that visa-holding international students at schools where classes are online due to the pandemic will lose their visas and “must depart the country” or “face immigration consequences, including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.”

Now, a number of Connecticut colleges and universities are pushing back.

“That policy is senseless and cruel,” said Yale Law School Dean Heather K. Gerken. “It forces students, faculty, and institutions to make a terrible choice, and it creates the possibility that students might have to leave the country at the height of a pandemic simply because public health conditions require a university to go online.”

Many schools plan

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