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How James Murdoch and a Generation of Wealthy Heirs Are Flocking to the Left

Photo credit: Max Mumby/Indigo - Getty Images
Photo credit: Max Mumby/Indigo – Getty Images

From Town & Country

Photo credit: Peter Serling/2020 (Trump) ; Celeste Sloman (Disney) ; Getty Images (Murdoch)
Photo credit: Peter Serling/2020 (Trump) ; Celeste Sloman (Disney) ; Getty Images (Murdoch)

Hands up if you had Claudia Conway, the daughter of conservative power couple George and Kellyanne Conway, emerging as a liberal poster child on your 2020 bingo card? Congratulations if you did. As chance would have it, the 15-year-old became as beloved on the left as universal healthcare thanks to a series of videos that she posted on TikTok in which she trolled the Trump administration, at one point urging her followers to leave “one star reviews on all of trumps restaurants, hotels and golf courses.”

The

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As Baltimore County schools prep for a virtual return, parents of special education students wonder if they’ll be left further behind

Emily Mullinix, a mother of two, worried that her 11-year-old daughter would have a tough time at Arbutus Middle School.

Having a student who relies on in-person communication with a speech language pathologist, Mullinix is worried how her daughter’s relationship with the specialist will translate online.

For most students the start of middle school brings about a variety of new experiences — new classes, new peers, new teachers. For Mullinix’s daughter, it also brings the possibility of a new Individualized Education Program (IEP), a customized instructional plan with specialized services for students who have a disability.

Mullinix’s daughter and 9-year-old son are two of roughly 16,000 students, or 14% of Baltimore County Public Schools’ population, who rely on IEPs to succeed..

Parents of students with IEPs say the sudden shift to remote learning in March amid state orders to curb the spread of the coronavirus disrupted more than just their

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‘I feel left behind.’ How people with disabilities are coping with the pandemic

Giovana Izzo hasn’t seen her son, Antonio, since March.

For the past four months, Antonio Izzo, 25, has lived in a group home aroiund the clock. And his family is feeling the consequences of the separation, his mom said.

Before the pandemic, he’d spend every weekend back home with his parents and three younger siblings. They’d laugh at how he loved to sing in the shower and talk about the public transit system.

During the week for the past four years, Antonio, who has autism, lived at a group home in the Redland to gain independence.

But COVID-caused isolation has created loneliness in Antonio Izzo and the rest of his family. It’s just one of the many challenges that people with disabilities have faced during the pandemic.

Isolation and technology

Giovana Izzo, who lives near Brickell, said the hardest times are when she realizes her son feels abandoned.

“This is

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now they’re left worried it may never happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons told Business Insider they were frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now, they’re left worried if it’ll ever happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons, speaking anonymously to Business Insider, said they are frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our

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