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Teen influencer Danielle Cohn appeared to suggest she was really 14 in an Instagram live, reviving questions about her age

Fans and critics of Danielle Cohn have speculated about whether she's really 16 or if she's actually younger. 

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Fans and critics of Danielle Cohn have speculated about whether she’s really 16 or if she’s actually younger.
  • Controversial teen influencer Danielle Cohn has been the subject of scrutiny for years, particuarly over questions about her real age.

  • Cohn and her mother say she turned 16 in March 2020, but Cohn’s father wrote an explosive Facebook post last year claiming she was actually only 13 at the time, which would make her 14 today.

  • In a recent livestream, Cohn was answering fan questions about whether she’d have a baby with her current boyfriend, and Cohn said she would consider it in “5 or 6 years” — when she is “19 or 20.”

  • That timeline would make her 14 now, but Cohn’s mother says she simply did the math wrong.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Speculation about influencer Danielle

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