lockdown

Kashmiris in limbo and lockdown

On 5 August 2019, the Indian government revoked a constitutional article that stripped the semi-autonomous status from the part of Kashmir it administers and split the region into two federally-run territories. A stringent curfew was imposed and thousands detained along with a communications black-out.

The lockdown began to be eased in March, but was then re-imposed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. It has been a year of shutdowns, anger and fear. The BBC spoke to 12 different Kashmiris, to find out what their lives have been like during this year.

Sanna Irshad Mattoo, 26

Sanna Irshad Mattoo,
Sanna Irshad Mattoo,

“In our line of work, you can’t separate the personal from the professional,” says Ms Mattoo, who has been a journalist for the last four years.

“We have been through lockdowns in previous years. But last year there was an environment of fear psychosis. We didn’t know what was happening. Our modes of

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During Lockdown, People Just Want to Dance

After founding DanceBody in 2013, Katia Pryce began 2020 with the urge to make things a bit more digitally savvy. She had no way of knowing that within a few weeks online workouts would become the key to survival for any boutique fitness business — but her dance-based workout class, with locations in Manhattan, Los Angeles and Miami, was one of the earliest pivoters into the world of at-home workouts at the start of the pandemic, making things that much more ready to succeed in this landscape.

Pryce, founder and owner of the business, made the decision to close her studios as she was boarding a flight back to New York on March 15. During the early days of lockdown, she and the company’s chief operating officer, Courtnay Mariani, ventured to the NoMad studio to film live classes for the streaming platform. But for the most part, it’s reminded her

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After ‘warning light’, British PM halts COVID lockdown unwind

By Alistair Smout and Paul Sandle

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Friday postponed a planned easing of the coronavirus lockdown in England after a rise in infections amplified fears of a second deadly surge in COVID-19 cases.

Just hours after Britain imposed tougher measures on swathes of northern England, Johnson announced that casinos, bowling alleys and skating rinks, due to reopen on Saturday, would remain shut for at least two more weeks.

Wedding receptions would also not be allowed.

“We’re now seeing a warning light on the dashboard,” Johnson told reporters at an online news conference from Downing Street when asked about a second surge.

“Our assessment is that we should now squeeze that brake pedal in order to keep the virus under control.”

Britain’s death toll from COVID-19 is over 55,000 when deaths from suspected cases are included, and it has the highest “excess death”

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New lockdown in the North of England

Shoppers wear face masks in Blackburn town centre - Christopher Furlong/Getty Images Europe
Shoppers wear face masks in Blackburn town centre – Christopher Furlong/Getty Images Europe

Partial lockdown reimposed across north of England

Boris Johnson last night ordered swathes of the north of England back into partial lockdown as he warned of a “damaging second wave” hitting the UK. Hundreds of thousands of people in Greater Manchester, Bradford, Blackburn and other areas were banned from holding indoor meetings involving people from different households. It comes after NHS data showed ­coronavirus reaching worrying levels in parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire, prompting the Prime Minister to take “immediate action” to keep people safe. Read the areas facing the indoor meeting ban, which include Leicester, which has had freedoms announced on June 23 reversed. How concerned should we be about a coronavirus resurgence? Science Editor Sarah Knapton analyses how, arguably, Britain is once again suffering from its haphazard testing regime, which is making it virtually impossible

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