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The Postman author warns Donald Trump’s attack on the mail service could take us back to the Middle Ages

Warner Bros.

In David Brin’s 1985 novel The Postman a survivor in post-apocalyptic America pretends to be a mail carrier, initially as a way of acquiring food and shelter. Ultimately, his lie about representing a national government encourages fellow survivors to band together and defeat an army of militarized survivalists. Kevin Costner directed and starred in a 1997 big screen adaptation, which became a notorious box office bomb. But Brin believes that President Donald Trump’s recent attacks on the mail service ahead of the election in November — one which will utilize the U.S. Postal Service like none before — represent a step towards a literal, real-life disaster and return to a feudal state.

“We are in the middle right now of an attempted worldwide oligarchic push to reinstall feudalism, the dismally-failed governance model that dominated 99 percent of societies on six continents for 6,000 years,” says Brin. “The

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Middle East mythbusters battle virus ‘infodemic’

Baghdad (AFP) – Browse through Arabic-language social media pages and you could walk away thinking COVID-19 is an American hoax, isn’t deadly and can be swiftly cured with a garlic clove.

Arabic pages on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are brimming with fake news stories on the novel coronavirus, from benign inaccuracies to full-throated conspiracy theories.

As authorities work to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus, activists across the Middle East are stepping up to combat the Arabic “infodemic” they say is as dangerous as the infection itself.

“We correct the news and save lives,” said Baher Jassem, an Iraqi activist from the Tech 4 Peace collective, which switched from its four-year campaign against fake political and economic news to setting the record straight on COVID-19.

Every few hours, the collective’s Facebook, Instagram and Twitter pages publish screenshots of fabricated news stories about the virus, from claims about new remedies

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How a leading left-wing academic and activist wound up in the middle of a free speech debate

Loretta Ross. (Courtesy of speakoutnow.org)
Loretta Ross. (Courtesy of speakoutnow.org)

WASHINGTON — A once obscure internet debate over the limits of free speech and the rise of what critics call “cancel culture” has, somewhat improbably, become a significant 2020 campaign issue. 

President Trump tapped into conservative worries about cancel culture — the notion that everyone from intellectuals to everyday citizens can be “canceled” and see their lives upended if they become the target of an online “mob” — in a July 3 speech at Mount Rushmore. Cancel culture, the president insisted, is “the very definition of totalitarianism.” 

Whether the president has hit on a winning issue is unclear. According to a Yahoo News/YouGov poll released Wednesday, 58 percent of Americans said they were unsure about what cancel culture refers to, and once it was explained to them, only 28 percent called it a “very big problem.” But beyond the 2020 campaign, a very real argument

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