millions

Higher education in the UK is morally bankrupt. I’m taking my research millions and I’m off | Ulf Schmidt | Education

As academics in England prepare for their strange new semester, I have been making the most of the familiar countryside of the idyllic North Downs in Kent. This summer, the picnics and the walks have been bittersweet: after more than 25 years in the UK, I am leaving to take up a professorship at Hamburg University in Germany.

Why am I am going back to the country of my birth? England no longer feels like home. Instead, since the Brexit vote of 2016, I have felt like a “leaver” in a waiting hall. Now I am going, and the emotional cost will take a long time to come to terms with.

I was from Germany, but I no longer feel I am from there. My seven-year-old son was born in England. His first language is English – he is English through and through. He loves fish and chips; he

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Coronavirus Evictions Are Starting, With Millions More Expected By The End Of 2020

Mary Robinson could lose her apartment if she can’t come up with a pile of money, but her unemployment benefits shrank from nearly $900 to $247 last week. 

The 39-year-old mother of two in Rochester, New York, could face eviction as the economy sputters and Congress dithers over whether to pass another coronavirus relief bill. 

“People that are working and trying to maintain get the shit end of the stick,” she said.

There are 30 million to 40 million people in the United States at risk of being evicted by the end of the year, according to a report released Friday by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. Unless Congress acts to reimpose a moratorium on certain evictions, extend unemployment benefits or offer some other relief, these people could be forced out of their homes in the middle of an economic downturn and a pandemic.

“The urgency of the situation

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As schools in Kashmir stay closed, millions of children lose education

A high-achiever at her government school in Jammu and Kashmir, Nadiya Akbar wants to pursue her dream of studying medicine - Samaan Lateef
A high-achiever at her government school in Jammu and Kashmir, Nadiya Akbar wants to pursue her dream of studying medicine – Samaan Lateef

Pausing to catch her breath, Nadiya Akbar, 16, squats on a rocky precipice overlooking the miniature houses of her village of Wagoora nestled in the valley below.

Since last August, Ms Akbar has had too much time to think. A high-achiever at her government school in Jammu and Kashmir, Ms Akbar’s parents had pooled together their savings in anticipation of Ms Akbar pursuing her dream of studying medicine.

Now, one year on, her dream lies in tatters and she has been forced to drop out of school and herd her family’s livestock to make ends meet.

“I was developing a severe infection in my right ear and I used to go to a local hospital where doctors treated me,” explained Ms Akbar. “I think that was the

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Federal government strikes deal with Pfizer, Moderna for millions of doses of COVID-19 vaccine

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 117,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and nearly 8,947 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 05

10:15 a.m. Canada secures vaccine candidates with Pfizer and Moderna

On Wednesday, Minister of Public Services and Procurement Anita

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Wealthy donors pour millions into fight over mail-in voting

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deep-pocketed and often anonymous donors are pouring over $100 million into an intensifying dispute about whether it should be easier to vote by mail, a fight that could determine President Donald Trump’s fate in the November election.

In the battleground of Wisconsin, cash-strapped cities have received $6.3 million from an organization with ties to left-wing philanthropy to help expand vote by mail. Meanwhile, a well-funded conservative group best known for its focus on judicial appointments is spending heavily to fight cases related to mail-in balloting procedures in court.

And that’s just a small slice of the overall spending, which is likely to swell far higher as the election nears.

The massive effort by political parties, super PACs and other organizations to fight over whether Americans can vote by mail is remarkable considering the practice has long been noncontroversial. But the coronavirus is forcing changes to the way

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How a little-known 1980 law slashed pay for millions of truck drivers and created big-box retail as we know it

An Illinois truck driver in 1940.
An Illinois truck driver in 1940.

Ivan Dmitri/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

  • Today’s network of big-box retailers and online shopping likely wouldn’t exist without the deregulation of the trucking industry 40 years ago this month.

  • The Motor Carrier Act of 1980, passed by President Jimmy Carter, slashed the cost of moving goods by truck.

  • It also eroded one of America’s great blue-collar jobs: truck driving.

  • A truck driver’s salary has decreased by as much as half since deregulation.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When Larry Heine was a working man he drove a truck eight hours a day. He saw his family every night, owned his home, sent both his kids to college, and took his wife on vacation to Hawaii whenever he could land some overtime.

As a member of the Teamsters, Heine was guaranteed good health care and a pension. He retired at 51, receiving a cake

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How Tucker Carlson went from a CIA reject to the most-watched person on cable news, accused of peddling prejudice to millions

Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel on March 29, 2019, in Washington, DC.
Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses ‘Populism and the Right’ during the National Review Institute’s Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel on March 29, 2019, in Washington, DC.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses ‘Populism and the Right’ during the National Review Institute’s Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC.

  • Tucker Carlson, 51, is the host of the “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Fox News — currently the most-watched cable news program in history.

  • Before embarking on a career in print and then television journalism, Carlson applied for a job at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) but was rejected.

  • Over the years, Carlson’s controversial comments about immigrants, women, and Black people have landed him in hot water and prompted dozens of companies to pull their advertisements from his show.

  • Now, prominent Republican figures in the GOP are saying that there is an “emerging consensus”

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