Money

Oakwood University uses CARES Act money to help community through students

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – One of Governor Ivey’s CARES Act allocations was a $72 million check towards higher education.

Oakwood University in Huntsville received $1.4 million of those funds. Oakwood University President Dr. Leslie Pollard said they were fortunate to be one of the schools that received a larger grant.

Pollard assigned three of his top administrators to apply the funds in Oakwood’s main areas of need, including technology, cyber technology, and community engagement.

The money for community engagement, Pollard said, will be used for a Community Health Clinic to help not only students to learn, but help community members as well.

“And of course education for them around health, around health preservation, around health maintenance, around healthy dieting and healthy eating, all of the things that they can do to actually help protect themselves against the virus,” Pollard said.

Pollard said this new endeavor is going to take community engagement

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COVID-19 will hit colleges when students arrive for fall semester. So why open at all? Money is a factor.

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be — and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all?

In many cases, it comes back to money.

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Colleges already lost billions of dollars when they pivoted to digital instruction in the spring, in the form of refunded room-and-board payments and expensive technology for online courses. Another semester — or year — of online courses could be even worse, especially for universities without large endowments.

For any institution, online instruction also means no money

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Money Experts Share the Smartest Ways To Boost Your Net Worth

Once you’ve reached the phase of your financial life when you’ve paid off your debts and have a healthy emergency fund tucked away in a savings account, it’s time to shift your focus to building your net worth. GOBankingRates spoke with four money experts on how they accumulated wealth, and their personal finance journeys can inspire you to do the same.

Click through to find out how to increase your wealth.

Last updated: Jan. 8, 2019

Starting Your Journey Toward Financial Success

“Financial success” means different things to different people, but if your goal is to increase your overall wealth, you might not know how to start. Keep reading to learn experts’ tried-and-true tips to improve your net worth.

Start With Cutting Out Unnecessary Expenses

“Set a weekly and monthly budget and stick to it no matter how tempted you are to buy those concert tickets or daily iced coffee

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See How Much Money Warren Buffett, Dana White and 35 Other CEOs Are Pouring Into the Election

The November election could prove to be one of the most controversial ever when it comes to the American presidency. President Donald Trump is already sounding off that the election is ripe for fraud, with him questioning the reliability of mail-in ballots. Worth noting is that on a national basis, President Trump trails in the polls less than three months before Election Day. In the event trends continue and presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden wins the election, President Trump is setting the stage to contest his defeat, unless the results are resounding.

In this environment, many noted CEOs and other wealthy corporate executives are supporting candidates and causes with significant amounts of money. To unearth the identities of the biggest donors, GOBankingRates analyzed data from the Federal Election Commission to tally up the amounts donated by prominent corporate figures to various political causes. Results have been presented in reverse order,

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How “Geographic Arbitrage” Can Make You Money

Young man mulls his finances
Young man mulls his finances

Geographic arbitrage is a term coined by the FIRE movement (Financial Independence, Retire Early). FIRE advocates combine investments and a typically high-paying job to achieve the dream of retiring by the time they hit their early 40s or even late 30s. One of their core tactics is to take advantage of local costs of living around the country and even the world to maintain the lowest cost of living possible, thereby stretching out their money and making early retirement possible.

This isn’t a new insight. Americans routinely look for lower costs of living. What geographic arbitrage adds is the idea of taking that model to the extreme. Where moving from the city to the suburbs can let you upgraded from a one-bedroom apartment to a house, moving from New York City to Naxos, Greece, can let you rewrite your financial future.

Here’s how it works.

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How influencers are using Amazon to make money

Kim Pratt
Kim Pratt

Kim Pratt

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Influencer Dashboard, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

Amazon wants to be a major player in the influencer business.

This week, I spoke with a YouTube creator who explained what it’s like to work with the ecommerce giant’s various programs and how she makes money, from affiliate commissions to livestreaming. 

Kim Pratt, who is a skincare influencer and YouTuber, is a member of the Amazon Influencer Program, and for every purchase someone makes through one of her links, she earns a commission ranging from 4% to 10% through the program, she said.

But still, she often doesn’t make much money on that first purchase one of her followers makes, since the products she links to usually range in price from $5 to $20. Her secret weapon on Amazon

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How to Earn Money Online

The jobs available for people looking to make money online run the gamut. On the internet, you can seek everything from full-time employment as a remote staff member to a work-whenever-you-want side hustle as a blogger or jewelry-maker.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has rattled the job market, online hiring is strong in a range of industries. According to Glassdoor’s Job Market Report, there were 11,430 remote job openings in July on Glassdoor, up 28.3% from the year before.

“The fields with the most remote-work listings right now include areas like customer service, sales, computer and (information technology), medical and health, and education and training,” wrote Brie Weiler Reynolds, career development manager and coach at FlexJobs, a resource for finding remote jobs, part-time jobs, freelance jobs and other flexible jobs, in an email.

These are industries where work has moved away from in-person to online interactions, she notes.

Other fields with

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10 Great Ways to Make Money While You Study Abroad

Studying abroad can be an invaluable part of a college education, but you might be worried about the cost. Fortunately, it is possible to support yourself out of the country if you figure out how to make money while studying abroad.

Some visas let you take part-time jobs, or you could work under-the-table as a tutor or babysitter. Plus, thanks to the internet, it’s easy to make money abroad by working online.

How to make money while studying abroad

If you’re looking for ways to finance a semester or two outside of the U.S., here are 10 options for study abroad jobs, as well as factors to consider as you decide whether to seek your fortune abroad.

1. Teach English 2. Tutor students in test prep 3. Work as a freelancer online 4. Babysit 5. Offer translation services 6. Become a tour guide 7. Help out at a hostel 8.

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Smart Money Moves if Coronavirus Forces Colleges Online This Fall

Many college students will find themselves learning in an entirely online or hybrid format this fall as the U.S. outbreak of the novel coronavirus worsens. The pandemic caught colleges and families by surprise in the early months of 2020, but ahead of the fall semester, college students have the opportunity to make a few smart money moves that may pay off in the uncharted months ahead.

With a modified on-campus college experience expected, financial experts say some students may want to consider transferring to a less expensive college to save money this year.

[READ: How to Bridge a Financial Aid Gap This Fall.]

Purdue University–West Lafayette in Indiana, for example, is one of the colleges planning for an in-person semester that will look different. The school will require that everyone, including all students and faculty, wear masks in campus buildings and practice social distancing and robust personal hygiene. Failure

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Schools Can’t Reopen Safely Without A Lot More Money. Congress Is Running Out Of Time.

WASHINGTON ― In a matter of weeks, millions of children will head back to school in the middle of a pandemic, leaving millions more parents filled with anxiety about risking their child’s health ― not to mention school staff ― to get an education.

Public schools cannot safely reopen without a massive infusion of emergency funding from Congress, which is already dangerously late to this. Think of all the things a single school needs: Hand sanitizers and disinfectant wipes for classrooms. No-touch thermometers. Regular deep cleanings, which means hiring more custodial staff. Ensuring that every school has at least one full-time nurse (25% of schools have no nurse at all). Someone on every school bus to screen kids’ temperatures before boarding. Gloves and masks for staff. Masks for students who don’t bring one from home. Resuming before- and after-school child care programs with new cleaning protocols.

That doesn’t even factor

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