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Jordan Thompson Secures Career First After Dominant Performance At US Open

Jordan Thompson has advanced to the fourth round of a grand slam for the first time in his career after blitzing Kazakhstan’s Mikhail Kukushkin in straight sets.

Thompson secured the 7-5 6-4 6-1 victory off the back of an impressive serving performance, hitting 11 aces and just 2 double faults as he landed 65% of his first serves.

The 26-year-old got off to a slow start, with the Kukushkin showing no sign of fatigue after his five-set thriller in round two as he broke the Australian in the fifth game.

However, Thomspon would maintain his composure, getting the break back before securing the first set 7-5 in 52 minutes.

The second set was a tight affair as both players traded breaks in the opening two games of the second game.

Eventually, Thompson would regain the ascendency, capitalising on a poor service game by the world number 90 to rake the

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When is it safe to open schools? States have varying answers

As schools across the U.S. decide whether to reopen this fall, many are left wondering how to know if it’s safe. Public health experts say virus rates in the community should be low, but there’s little agreement on a specific threshold or even a measurement.

The federal government has largely left it to state and local governments to decide when it’s safe to bring students back to the classroom. The result is a patchwork of policies that vary widely by state and county. Minnesota, for example, suggests fully in-person classes if a county’s two-week case rate is no higher than 10 per 10,000 people. In Pennsylvania, it’s considered safe if a county’s positive virus tests average lower than 5% for a week.

The uncertainty has become a source of tension among school leaders who say they are being pressured to reopen without clear guidelines on how to do it safely.

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‘We have had parents crying for us to open’

Children’s summer camp provider Richard Bernstein says he has had mums and dads sobbing down the line to him.

“We had parents on the phone, literally crying, asking us to open this year,” says Mr Bernstein, director of UK company XUK Camps.

“They said they needed to take their child somewhere so they could work, and if they couldn’t they would effectively lose their jobs.”

Like children’s activities and entertainment businesses around the world, XUK hasn’t been able to open this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We’ve lost 95% of our income, and we’ll make a six figure loss [this year],” says Mr Bernstein. “We’re in a position that we’re able to ride this year out, but there will be a lot of organisations in the sector that will not be able to cope with what has happened in 2020.”

Pre-school activity classes can be a vital way for

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COVID-19 will hit colleges when students arrive for fall semester. So why open at all? Money is a factor.

Colleges that are reopening campuses this fall know they’re bringing a higher risk of coronavirus to their community.

The questions aren’t really about if or when, but about how bad outbreaks could be — and whether having an in-person experience for students is worth the cost. With so much at stake, some students, parents and faculty are asking: Why take the risk at all?

In many cases, it comes back to money.

For months, colleges and experts have warned another semester of remote courses could have disastrous effects on student enrollment and college budgets.

Colleges already lost billions of dollars when they pivoted to digital instruction in the spring, in the form of refunded room-and-board payments and expensive technology for online courses. Another semester — or year — of online courses could be even worse, especially for universities without large endowments.

For any institution, online instruction also means no money

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How to open schools the right way this fall

Of all the challenges COVID-19 has thrown at us, nothing is more daunting than figuring out how to open and operate schools this fall. The problems are complex, multifaceted and impact almost all of us. As an education official in Richmond, Virginia said:  “…planning for reopening school this fall is like playing a game of 3-D chess while standing on one leg in the middle of a hurricane.” 

That’s a simile as powerful as it is apt. (It also kind of sounds like Mr. Spock-meets-Jumpin’ Jack Flash.)

And this most fraught back-to-school of all time has begun of course. (Depending on where you live, kids return to school as early as the first week of August or as late as the second week of September. Every one of the nation’s 13,000 school districts has its own calendar. Ditto for colleges and universities.) But opening day is just the starting point.

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Trump says open schools. Teachers say safety first. As cases rise, unions may win.

Chicago teachers piled into hundreds of cars on the first Monday of August and rolled their way to City Hall.

No strangers to large demonstrations, the teachers spent hours protesting Chicago Public Schools’ plan to mix in-school and at-home learning this fall to reduce crowding in buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff didn’t feel safe teaching in person, the educators said, especially given rising rates of positive COVID-19 cases in Illinois. The demonstration had hallmarks of the massive strike the Chicago Teachers Union waged 10 months prior during a contract dispute with the city.

As union members murmured about potentially striking again for their safety, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Chicago’s near 400,000 students would start the year online-only on Sept. 8. That means almost all of America’s biggest districts will start the school year with online learning – a move largely driven by local teachers unions.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, joined by Chicago Public Schools CEO Dr. Janice K. Jackson, right rear, announce a preliminary reopening framework for public schools during a press conference, Friday, July 17, 2020, at CPS Headquarters in Chicago.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot,
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‘I can’t teach when I’m dead.’ Professors fear COVID-19 as college campuses open

Students' return for fall semester was staggered over 10 days at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, to enforce social distancing during as they settled in. <span class="copyright">(Gerry Broome / Associated Press)</span>
Students’ return for fall semester was staggered over 10 days at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, to enforce social distancing during as they settled in. (Gerry Broome / Associated Press)

When masked students walk back into his Northern Arizona University lab room at the end of the month, Tad Theimer will face them from behind a Plexiglas face shield while holding an infrared thermometer to their foreheads. As they examine bat skulls under microscopes, the biology professor will open windows and doors, hoping to drive out exhaled aerosols that could spread coronavirus.

But as one of hundreds of professors who will be back on campus along with 20,000 students in one of the states hit worst by the pandemic, Theimer is also torn on whether to enter his classroom at all.

“I want to teach and it’s best done in person,” said Theimer, 62, who has been a professor

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Trump says open schools. Teachers say not until they’re safe. As cases rise, unions may win.

Chicago teachers piled into hundreds of cars on the first Monday of August and rolled their way to City Hall.

No strangers to large demonstrations, the teachers spent hours protesting Chicago Public Schools’ plan to mix in-school and at-home learning this fall to reduce crowding in buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Staff didn’t feel safe teaching in person, the educators said, especially given rising rates of positive COVID-19 cases in Illinois. The demonstration had hallmarks of the massive strike the Chicago Teachers Union waged 10 months prior during a contract dispute with the city.

As union members murmured about potentially striking again for their safety, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Chicago’s near 400,000 students would start the year online-only on Sept. 8. That means almost all of America’s biggest districts will start the school year with online learning — a move largely driven by local teachers unions.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, joined by Chicago Public Schools CEO Dr. Janice K. Jackson, right rear, announce a preliminary reopening framework for public schools during a press conference, Friday, July 17, 2020, at CPS Headquarters in Chicago.
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot,
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This California school is open, ‘learning as we go.’ Is it a model or a mistake?

China Arkansas, 8, an incoming third-grader at Mount St. Mary's Academy in Grass Valley, Calif., takes an assessment test under the watch of teacher David Pistone. <span class="copyright">(Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)</span>
China Arkansas, 8, an incoming third-grader at Mount St. Mary’s Academy in Grass Valley, Calif., takes an assessment test under the watch of teacher David Pistone. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Inside Mount St. Mary’s Academy, a Catholic school in this Gold Rush town in the Sierra Nevada foothills, a life-size statue of the Virgin Mary stands sentinel over the check-in table at the front door. Students returning for the fall session stop under her watchful gaze for a modern ritual of pandemic life: temperature check, hand sanitizer, questions on their potential as virus vectors.

Thursday morning, Principal Edee Wood wore a red paisley-printed mask as she wielded a digital thermometer intended to protect the 160 students at her school, one of the few in California attempting in-person classes this fall. At Mount St. Mary’s, life is going back to normal with crisp uniforms, sharp pencils and classes five

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Protesters Call For Harford County Public Schools To Open: Report

HARFORD COUNTY, MD — Both parents and children are reportedly marching around South Hickory Avenue Thursday night calling for Harford County Public Schools to reopen.

Protesters held signs outside the Harford County Public Schools headquarters that said things like “School Is Essential” and “Virtual Learning Fails Our Kids,” according to WMAR.

The demonstration came three weeks after Harford County Public Schools Superintendent Sean Bulson announced the school system would be conducting its first semester entirely online.

“There is general agreement that safe, in-person learning would be the first preference, but the current conditions make it impossible for large groups of students to be in school at one time,” Bulson wrote in a letter announcing the decision in mid-July.

Karen Schandelmeier, a parent of rising 9th- and 6th-grade students, reportedly organized the protest due to what she called a “complete debacle” during the spring semester, when she said most students learned

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