options

Northrop Grumman weighing exit options for OmegA rocket

Northrop Grumman statement: “We will determine next steps once the debriefing process concludes.”

WASHINGTON — When Northrop Grumman unveiled its OmegA rocket in April 2018, the company was clear that it developed the vehicle for the sole purpose of challenging United Launch Alliance and SpaceX for national security space launch contracts.

The Air Force decided to stick with ULA and SpaceX to provide launch services from 2022 to 2027. Without a significant commercial business to fall back on, OmegA does not appear to have a future.

But Northrop Grumman says no final decisions will be made until after the Air Force briefs the company on the reasons why the vehicle was not selected.

“The post-award debriefing process currently is underway, and we are learning more about the U.S. Space Force’s evaluation decisions,” Northrop Grumman spokeswoman Jennifer Bowman told SpaceNews Aug. 21. “We will determine next steps once the debriefing process

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5 alternative school options parents are weighing as more districts opt for remote learning

CHICAGO — Laura Reber, founder and CEO of Chicago Home Tutors, has been fielding calls from nervous parents around the clock in recent weeks, as uncertainty over fall schooling sent many searching for alternative options.

Reber, whose firm of 100 tutors has served Chicago-area students for eight years, said she understands parents’ frustrations. Her reassurances to them focus on the fact that, while it might not be an ideal year for education, their students — and their peers across the country — will get through it.

“The whole nation is going to be in the same boat,” she said. “Not that that’s a huge comfort, but if you move to a private school or another district, there’s really no guarantee that they’re not going to change their plan.”

With Mayor Lori Lightfoot announcing Wednesday that the new school year will begin with remote learning instead of a hybrid plan in

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Unhappy with school options, parents team up to form learning pods to educate their kids

South Florida parents, desperate for in-person education for their kids during the COVID-19 pandemic, are teaming up with their neighbors to create 21st-century schoolhouses in their homes and offices, complete with teachers and tutors to supervise.

These parents were disappointed with the virtual offerings from South Florida’s school districts last spring, when COVID-19 abruptly forced school buildings to close, and fear their children will lose important social and academic skills as education remains online. They want to make sure the kids get a more substantive, live learning experience this fall.

The learning pods aren’t cheap; many will cost each family more than $1,000 a month. Educators fear the pods will exacerbate inequalities in the public school system, as parents who can afford them will pay to supplement their children’s online schooling, while those with fewer resources will have to make do with the public school systems’ distance offerings.

The parents

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As school begins amid virus, parents see few good options

WOODSTOCK, Ga. (AP) — John Barrett plans to keep his daughter home from elementary school this year in suburban Atlanta, but he wishes she was going. Molly Ball is sending her teenage sons to school in the same district on Monday, but not without feelings of regret.

As the academic year begins in many places across the country this week, parents are faced with the difficult choice of whether to send their children to school or keep them home for remote learning because of the coronavirus pandemic. Many are unhappy with either option.

“I definitely think it’s healthy for a child to go back to school,” said Ball, who feels her sons, William and Henry, both at River Ridge High School in Georgia’s Cherokee County district, suffered through enough instability in the spring. “At the same time, I wish they weren’t going back to school right now. It’s very scary.”

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CPS parents weigh difficult options for fall as officials try to quell fears about open schools and remote learning

Parents clamored for details about remote learning options at Chicago Public Schools’ fourth virtual feedback session on Thursday, even as officials laid out plans for a partial return to the classroom this fall and said an eventual return to the classroom is inevitable.

“At some point students will return to school,” said CPS CEO Janice Jackson. “It may be on Sept. 8, it’s possible it could be later in the year, but whatever the case may be, students will be returning to school.”

Jackson and other CPS leaders described the district’s tentative hybrid plan for fall, which for most students would include two days of in-person instruction, with students grouped in small “pods” meant to silo them off reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19. The rest of the week would involve two days of remote learning and one day with live online classes.

Officials, including Chicago’s Public Health Commissioner

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Aid and Student Loan Options

Before you head to the University of Minnesota, you’ll need to figure out how to cover the costs. For the 2020-21 academic year, the annual University of Minnesota cost of tuition and fees for the flagship Twin Cities campus is $15,142 for Minnesota residents and $33,440 for non-residents.

Fortunately, those are just the “sticker prices.” You can likely reduce costs with financial aid in the form of scholarships, grants and work-study — and if you still have a gap in funding, you might consider borrowing federal or private student loans.

Let’s take a closer look at how to cover your University of Minnesota cost of attendance without taking on too much debt by turning to the following…

The FAFSA Grants for University of Minnesota students Scholarships for University of Minnesota students Federal work-study Federal student loans University of Minnesota student loans Private student loans

Plus: Some final tips on paying

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He had a box cutter, ignored commands, and a cop shot him six times. Were there better options?

LAPD Officer Toni McBride has faced scrutiny after she fatally shot a man April 22. The discussion partly involves her status as a gun-toting model and her father's position with the Police Protective League. <span class="copyright">(Dillon Precision Products)</span>
LAPD Officer Toni McBride has faced scrutiny after she fatally shot a man April 22. The discussion partly involves her status as a gun-toting model and her father’s position with the Police Protective League. (Dillon Precision Products)

Ten years ago, after a controversial case in which an LAPD officer shot and killed a man armed with a knife, the department offered me a chance to virtually experience what it’s like to make a split-second decision about when to shoot.

I got a crash course on LAPD’s deadly-force policy and then was sent into a video simulator room, where I was handed a service belt with a Glock semiautomatic. Then they started a video in which a series of actors played threatening suspects, and I had to figure out whether or not to shoot.

It wasn’t easy. Deciding when a suspect might be a threat to an officer or other people

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Methacton Offering Students On Premise And Online Options

EAGLEVILLE, PA — Methacton School District tentatively plans to have an in-person schooling option this fall, part of a dual option plan which also offers families and students the choice of taking classes online.

The announcement comes as Montgomery County officials recently issued their countywide school reopening guidelines, which require masks and discourage large gatherings, field trips and extracurricular activities.

Methacton’s reopening plan includes an Aug. 31 start date. All students and staff must wear a face covering in schools, unless they are seated at desks that are six feet apart. This, however, will not always be possible.

“While some health organizations recommend 6’ distance for grades K -12, it may not be practical for students 100% of the school day,” the district notes in their plan.

Otherwise, face coverings can only be removed outdoors when social distancing is possible, while eating and drinking in a socially distanced manner, and

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Parents rush to hire tutors and create learning pods. But not everyone has options

Luna Tringale, 6, sister Anaya Tringale, 5, father Rolando Tringale and mother Kamren Curiel are preparing for school to resume next month. <span class="copyright">(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Luna Tringale, 6, sister Anaya Tringale, 5, father Rolando Tringale and mother Kamren Curiel are preparing for school to resume next month. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

The advertisements started popping up on social media almost immediately after Los Angeles Unified School District said campuses would remain closed for the start of the school year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’re looking for a TA/College student to help with LAUSD’s virtual learning for the new school year. Parents are WFH. Kids are 5th, 3rd and potentially K. We’re starting a learning pod with another family. Any TA’s on the westside … looking for work?”

“ISO: Teacher/Tutor for 2nd grader and a little Kinder if possible. Would be open to hosting a very small pod in our back yard.”

“I am looking for a TA or tutor to help facilitate remote learning with my twin 1st graders and my 5th

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North Penn To Offer Three Options In School Reopening Plan

LANSDALE, PA — The North Penn School District will offer a multi-option plan for students heading into the 2020-21 school year, with families given a choice of in-person, virtual, or hybrid instruction, officials announced.

The announcement comes as Montgomery County officials recently issued their countywide school reopening guidelines, which require masks and discourage large gatherings, field trips and extracurricular activities.

Families must return a School Reopening Selection Form indicating which of the three options their student has selected. The deadline to return the form is Monday, July 27 at noon. The form can be accessed here.

The instruction will be a combination of “synchronous” and “asynchronous” classrooms, with some, but not all activities taught to in-person and online students at the same time.

The recommendations are the result of the work of more than 20 committees over a period of weeks who have been analyzing educational options, safety, and going

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