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University of Michigan seeks restraining order to end graduate employee strike

ANN ARBOR, MI – As the University of Michigan Graduate Employees’ Organization (GEO) voted to extend its strike for “a safe and just campus” for an additional five days, the university is seeking a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction against the union strike.

UM is asking the Washtenaw County Circuit Court to order striking members of the GEO to return to work. The union represents about 2,000 graduate student instructors and graduate student staff assistants.

In the court filing, UM noted that, “Not only are GEO’s members interfering in the university’s mission to educate students by unlawfully withholding their labor, they are encouraging impressionable undergraduate students, over whom they exercise significant authority, to forego their education.”

The strike began Tuesday, Sept. 8, as graduate students marched and chanted at five different locations on UM’s campus. It has gained the support of undergraduate students; graduate student organizations from other colleges,

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Education Department clarifies Trump executive order on student loans

Those are the same terms Congress agreed on in the last stimulus package. Lawmakers suspended education debt payments through Sept. 30 after the Trump administration in March gave borrowers the option of postponing payments for at least 60 days as the pandemic battered the economy.

As the deadline approached and Congress was unable to reach an agreement on an extension, Trump stepped in this month. But the president’s order created more questions than it gave answers about how the suspension would be applied. And by giving borrowers the option of halting their payments, rather than making the process automatic, and ignoring the treatment of loans in default, consumer advocates worried that many would fall through the cracks.

On Friday, the department addressed many of those concerns, though others remain. Chief among them is that the order still excludes more than 7 million borrowers whose federal loans are held by private

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Sacramento health officials order Capital Christian to shut down for violating COVID-19 rules

Sacramento County health officials on Tuesday ordered Capital Christian School to stop on-campus instruction, saying the school was violating state and local coronavirus orders by claiming to be a day care center.

Under emergency orders issued by Gov. Gavin Newsom, Sacramento County schools are not yet allowed to open for in-class learning. Child care centers are, however, allowed to be open with restrictions.

Given those restrictions, Capital Christian Head of Schools Tim Wong told The Sacramento Bee the school used its elementary-school program as a model, in effect classifying the classroom as a day care session, allowing it to open.

Students returned to classrooms last week. Kindergarten through fifth-graders are required to attend in person, according to the school website. Older students and their families are allowed to choose whether to attend in person or to participate online from home.

Capital Christian is one of the largest private schools in

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Hillsborough Parents File Suit Over School District’s Mask Order

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL — A group of parents has filed a lawsuit against the Hillsborough County School District objecting to the district’s policy that all students, staff and visitors wear face masks at school.

Hillsborough County will begin the school year Monday with all students learning online from their homes. Then, on Aug. 31, the district will reopen brick-and-mortar schools.

In a survey conducted in July, 56 percent of Hillsborough County parents said they wanted to send their children back to brick-and-mortar schools.

However, parents Kevin Levonas, Angelina Aucello, Matt and Priscilla Poage, Justin and Grace Warniment, Elizabeth Hagan, Mike Miller and Robert and Evelyn Griffith filed a lawsuit Friday in the 13th Judicial Circuit Court, contending that the requirement to wear masks is a violation of the Florida Constitution forbidding the interference of a parent’s right to decline the use of a medical device.

Additionally, because the school district

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COVID-19 symptoms often appear in this order, and why you really should get your flu shot this year

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling on House lawmakers to return this week to vote on a bill that would block the changes that the Trump administration has made to the U.S. Postal Service. 

Pelosi and other Democrats say the changes will cause a slowing of the flow of mail and potentially jeopardize the November election. Pelosi’s request comes after a testy few days over the Postal Service and whether it’s up to handling an unprecedented number of mail-in ballots this year because of increased vote-by-mail eligibility amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Meanwhile, public health officials are urging the public to get flu vaccines, saying they’re even more important than ever because of COVID-19. The flu shot isn’t always effective, but it’s much better than nothing. And it’s hard to know how the flu will interact with COVID-19.

Also, a group of researchers from University of Southern California tracked the common

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Education Commissioner Says School Board Violated State Order

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL — Despite reprovals from the Florida Department of Education, the Hillsborough County School District is moving forward with its plans to offer online learning only for four weeks following the start of school on Aug. 24.

Following the school district’s 5-2 vote Thursday, Florida Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran sent a letter to Hillsborough schools Superintendent Addison Davis and school board chairwoman Melissa Snively informing them that the school board’s decision “directly contradicts the district’s reopening plan.”

After Corcoran issued an executive order July 6 mandating that all Florida school districts reopen brick-and-mortar schools in August to receive state funding, each school district was required to submit a reopening plan to the state by July 31.

The Hillsborough County School District’s plan gave parents a choice of sending their children back to class or having them learn online through either an online class provided by the student’s school

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Pelosi calls Trump executive order ‘unconstitutional slop’; US surpasses 5 million confirmed cases

President Donald Trump’s decision to unilaterally act on the pandemic-driven recession with executive orders drew scalding criticism from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday as the U.S. reached another historic milestone by surpassing 5 million cases.

The U.S. is home to about one-quarter of cases reported worldwide. And our numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

Trump, unable to cut a deal with Congress on a new $1 trillion stimulus package, signed an executive order and issued three memorandums Saturday. One would provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits to millions of out-of-work Americans. Pelosi dismissed the package as an “illusion” and “constitutional slop.”

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US surpasses 5 million confirmed cases; Pelosi calls Trump executive order, other measures ‘constitutional slop’

President Donald Trump’s decision to unilaterally act on the pandemic-driven recession by with executive orders drew scalding criticism from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday as the U.S. reached another historic milestone by surpassing 5 million cases.

The U.S. home to about one-quarter of cases reported worldwide. And our numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

Trump, unable to cut a deal with Congress on a new $1 trillion stimulus package, signed an executive order and issued three memorandums Saturday. One would provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits to millions of out-of-work Americans. Pelosi dismissed the package as an “illusion” and “constitutional slop.”

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US on brink of 5 million confirmed cases; Trump executive order may have exceeded authority

The U.S. was on the brink of another historic milestone Sunday, poised to surpass 5 million reported cases of COVID-19 — a number roughly equal to one-quarter of total worldwide cases reported.

The numbers continue to roar higher: More than 56,000 new U.S. cases were reported Sunday, with more than 1,000 deaths. More than 162,000 Americans have died in little more than six months.

The Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus dashboard also reported record-breaking numbers in Brazil, the second hardest-hit nation in terms of deaths and cases. Brazil has now exceeded 100,000 deaths and 3 million cases. 

All this as the world neared 20 million cases, a number experts widely believe is underreported due to insufficient testing. 

The staggering numbers come as world leaders grapple with the ongoing human and economic toll of the virus. President Donald Trump has previously attributed high number of cases in the U.S. to expanded testing,

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Trump’s executive order on unemployment could take months to implement; hundreds quarantining in Ga. school district

After weeks of stalled congressional negotiations over a new coronavirus stimulus package, President Donald Trump signed a series of executive orders Saturday evening as the U.S. was approaching 5 million cases of COVID-19.

Trump, repeatedly referring to the coronavirus as the “China virus,” said the orders would provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits, suspend payments on some student loans through the end of the year and protect renters from being evicted from their homes.

“We’re coming back very strong. We’re doing well with the virus,” Trump said, even as the U.S. was leading nations worldwide in confirmed cases and deaths from COVID-19 and confirmed an additional 50,000 new cases Friday.

Top Democrats criticized the move and unemployment experts were left confused about how it might be implemented, speculating it could take months for states to figure it out.

Meanwhile, South Dakota was hosting one of the largest

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