pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic affects the future of Gen Z travel

Clarissa Fisher, 23, is nowhere near ready to hop on a plane. She used to fly regularly to visit her boyfriend in the U.K.

“This past week, I have seen so many people return to their normal activities like nothing has happened,” says Fisher of  Frankfort, Kentucky. “This scares me and has made me reconsider my travel plans for the remainder of this year and possibly the next. I’m afraid to board a plane, knowing that I might step off infected. Being trapped in a small space with a large amount of strangers for several hours is a pandemic nightmare scenario.” 

Like others in her generation, she’s grown up with crisis after crisis: From 9/11 to devastating school shootings to COVID-19, this generation, born after 1996, is used to living in dangerous times. This generation is primed to handle crisis after crisis and will adapt to extra safety precautions.

Thirty-five percent of 18- to 34-year-olds don’t plan on going on vacation this year, according to a Morning Consult online poll last month commissioned by the American Hotel & Lodging Association – though 27% have taken a non-business trip, including an overnight stay, since March.

Members of Generation Z will approach travel differently by being much more cautious about stepping on a plane, washing their hands frequently and otherwise mitigating risks, concerned for their families and themselves. 

‘A worried generation’

Ann Fishman, a marketing expert who specializes in generational targeting, defines Gen Z as those born from 2001

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Telehealth called a ‘silver lining’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. This time, it might stick

Telehealth use surged from 8% of Americans in December to 29% in May as primary care and mental health physicians and specialists turned to remote care out of necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a UnitedHealth Group report.

Telehealth evangelists long have touted using high-speed internet connections and a range of devices to link providers and patients for remote care. But regulatory hurdles and medicine’s conservative culture limited virtual checkups to largely minor conditions such as sinus infections or unique circumstances such as connecting neurologists to rural hospitals that lack specialized care.

The pandemic lockdowns closed doctors’ offices and delayed nonemergency care for millions of Americans. Some clinics scrambled to acquire technology platforms to deliver remote care. Others employed rarely used video programs to reach patients in their homes.

Remote visits among Medicare patients surged through the end of March, prompting Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Director Seema Verma to say she “can’t imagine going back.”

Dr. Tiffany Link listens to a patient during a telehealth session in her spare bedroom in her home in Fort Collins, Colo., on May 20.
Dr. Tiffany Link listens to a patient during a telehealth session in her spare bedroom in her home in Fort Collins, Colo., on May 20.

After emergency legislation eased Medicare payment restrictions and allowed doctors to practice across state lines, some predicted a significant portion of Americans will choose to get care remotely as stay-at-home orders lift.

“There will be a wave of ongoing adoption and increased acceptance, even as the pandemic begins to wind down,” said Dr. Wyatt Decker, CEO of OptumHealth. “I think the shift is permanent.”

‘Your own doctor

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Schools buy miles of plexiglass ahead of potential reopenings amid coronavirus pandemic

As millions of students return to school — be it K-12 or university — they’ll return to familiar settings in their classroom with one obvious addition: layers of plexiglass.

It remains unclear if schools — universities in particular — can reopen campuses amid a surge of coronavirus cases and new restrictions such as the 14-day quarantines demanded from those who travel from various to the tri-state area of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.

Sheets of plexiglass would play a big role in a reopening, and schools across the country are investing in the plastic sheet to create a division in common spaces such as in libraries, classrooms — and even school buses — to defend against transmission of coronavirus.

“We’re hitting records… week in week out, at this point from a sales perspective,” Ryan Schroeder, CEO of Plaskolite, one of the country’s biggest plexiglass makers, told Yahoo Finance. “Orders have been substantially higher [than normal]. So we are really, at this point, running all our sheet machines at full capacity… around the clock.” 

Pupils sitting behind partition boards made of plexiglass attend a class at a primary school, during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Den Bosch, Netherlands, May 8, 2020. (PHOTO: REUTERS/Piroschka van de Wouw)

Plexiglass seller is ‘hitting records’

A Dallas-area school district recently ordered 30,000 sheets of plexiglass, or about five miles.

In Roanoke County, Virginia, the school district has placed an order for 3,600 square feet of plexiglass “to create barriers for each school

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The coronavirus pandemic ‘has undone years of work’ for women, Yahoo Finance survey shows

Women, especially middle-aged ones, have been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic in terms of job loss, fewer options for remote work, and needing more time to recover financially from the crisis, according to a new survey from Harris Poll and Yahoo Finance. 

Nearly all men between the ages of 35 and 44 — 96% — were still working the same job as before the pandemic, only 60% of women the same age were, according to the survey of 2033 Americans. The latest unemployment rate shows 8.9% unemployment for men in that age group and 9.4% in June.

Read more: Here’s how to navigate changes in your career

A similar discrepancy shows up between men and women who are 45 to 54.  More than three-quarters of men that age have the same job, but just under 6 in 10 women do, the survey found.

That difference, among others found in the survey, could mean it will take longer for women to recuperate from the pandemic’s economic effects — if they ever fully do.

“This recession already has undone years of work, and the implication for women in particular, really may be very long-lasting,” said Martha Gimbel, manager of economic research at Schmidt Future. “Losing a year of work is really devastating. That’s what a lot of people are facing if the public health crisis doesn’t get under control.”

Six-year-old Leo (R) and his three-year old brother Espen (C) complete homeschooling activities suggested by the online learning website of their

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Queer Eye’s Tan France Uses His ‘Hellacious’ Start in Business to Help Owners During the Pandemic

When it comes to launching a small business amid tough economic times, Tan France can certainly relate.

“I started building my business within the [2007-09] recession, which was so unwise but I had no other choice,” the Queer Eye star, who founded fashion brand Kingdom & State, tells PEOPLE. “The first year-and-a-half, in particular, was so dire.”

“I started very late 2009, and 2010 was a wash. Then in 2011, I learned how to change things up to make it appropriate for what people were actually going through at that time,” France, 37, continues. “So I absolutely know what it means to pivot your business and switch things up to cater to the new market or audience.”

What France didn’t know, however, was that his experience would benefit him years later as he takes on his newest venture: starring on Facebook Watch’s Boost My Business, a show where he and other Facebook experts help eight small business owners grow online using social media.

The show, which is part of Facebook’s Summer of Support program and offers small businesses six weeks of free educational training, was filmed before the coronavirus pandemic swept through the U.S.

At the time, France was encouraging businesses to adopt online strategies, but his advice has taken on an entirely new meaning in recent months as businesses have been forced to rely on their digital sales to survive.

The 12-minute weekly episodes now feature a segment at the end where France reconnects with the businesses to

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