parents

Parents of college kids won’t stop having ‘the talk’ about Covid-19 protocol

Lourdes Pelaez-Kingery was recovering from appendix surgery when she got the phone call that parents of college-age kids have come to dread in this time of coronavirus: Her daughter tearfully explained that she had moved out of her dorm at Texas A&M University-San Antonio days earlier after her suitemates threw a party and 14 unmasked friends showed up.



a group of people walking in front of a building: The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, was nearly empty on May 7 as classes were canceled due to the pandemic. Fall semester classes are currently online only.


© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, was nearly empty on May 7 as classes were canceled due to the pandemic. Fall semester classes are currently online only.

“She told me she had moved off-campus to family friends of ours and then begged me to let her come home,” said Pelaez-Kingery, a health care worker who lives in League City, Texas. “Because of my job and her dad’s — he’s a critical care nurse — she knew there was no way she could come home if she

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Black parents see college degree as a key to success

Dear Reader,

I probably would have never gone to college had I not spent two months of my childhood in a hospital.

While in middle school, I was diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The pain in my legs became so bad that I couldn’t walk. My grandmother, “Big Mama,” a nursing assistant who raised me from the time I was 4, couldn’t afford to miss work to take me to the daily physical therapy appointments I needed to walk without pain. So I stayed at the hospital. I cried a lot over the isolation from my grandmother and my two brothers and two sisters, whom she also was raising.

Sincerely, Michelle In a 10-part series, Michelle Singletary gets personal about common misconceptions involving race and inequality.

The director of the physical therapy department, a Black licensed therapist, saw how lonely I was and adopted me as her goddaughter. After my

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‘We have had parents crying for us to open’

Children’s summer camp provider Richard Bernstein says he has had mums and dads sobbing down the line to him.

“We had parents on the phone, literally crying, asking us to open this year,” says Mr Bernstein, director of UK company XUK Camps.

“They said they needed to take their child somewhere so they could work, and if they couldn’t they would effectively lose their jobs.”

Like children’s activities and entertainment businesses around the world, XUK hasn’t been able to open this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We’ve lost 95% of our income, and we’ll make a six figure loss [this year],” says Mr Bernstein. “We’re in a position that we’re able to ride this year out, but there will be a lot of organisations in the sector that will not be able to cope with what has happened in 2020.”

Pre-school activity classes can be a vital way for

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Parents Brace for a Go-It-Alone School Year

Parents across America are facing the pandemic school year feeling overwhelmed, anxious and abandoned. With few good options for support, the vast majority have resigned themselves to going it alone, a new survey for The New York Times has found.

Just one in seven parents said their children would be returning to school full time this fall, and for most children, remote school requires hands-on help from an adult at home. Yet four in five parents said they would have no in-person help educating and caring for them, whether from relatives, neighbors, nannies or tutors, according to the survey, administered by Morning Consult. And more than half of parents will be taking on this second, unpaid job at the same time they’re holding down paid work.

Raising children has always been a community endeavor, and suddenly the village that parents relied on is gone. It’s taking a toll on parents’

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Many Schools Are Using a Hybrid Learning Model This Year; Here’s What Parents Should Know

going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are setting up “pandemic pods” – where a small group of students of similar ages and abilities gathers at one family’s home to learn from a teacher – others are working with their local districts using a hybrid learning model.” data-reactid=”19″Depending on what part of the US you live in, going back to school in the traditional sense may be entirely off the table. And regardless of how old your children are, navigating these uncertain times have proven to be a hellish nightmare we wish we could wake up from challenging to say the least. While some families are

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Hillsborough Parents File Suit Over School District’s Mask Order

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL — A group of parents has filed a lawsuit against the Hillsborough County School District objecting to the district’s policy that all students, staff and visitors wear face masks at school.

Hillsborough County will begin the school year Monday with all students learning online from their homes. Then, on Aug. 31, the district will reopen brick-and-mortar schools.

In a survey conducted in July, 56 percent of Hillsborough County parents said they wanted to send their children back to brick-and-mortar schools.

However, parents Kevin Levonas, Angelina Aucello, Matt and Priscilla Poage, Justin and Grace Warniment, Elizabeth Hagan, Mike Miller and Robert and Evelyn Griffith filed a lawsuit Friday in the 13th Judicial Circuit Court, contending that the requirement to wear masks is a violation of the Florida Constitution forbidding the interference of a parent’s right to decline the use of a medical device.

Additionally, because the school district

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Covid-Era Tech Grads Launch Careers From Parents’ Homes

(Bloomberg) — Eric Lee has dreamed of working for Microsoft Corp. for as long as he can remember, and was stoked this spring to land a job at the tech giant right out of college. But instead of traveling across the country to start his career at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash., Lee joined the workforce this month from his family’s house in the suburbs of Boston.

The arrangement has its comforts. Every hour Lee’s mom brings him a different type of cut-up fruit, then usually noodles for lunch. But he feels disconnected from his new colleagues in a way he wouldn’t if they were sharing an office. When Lee gets stuck on a tricky line of code, he sends a message asking for advice, then tries to figure it out himself. If that fails, he passes the time until he gets a response by watching videos on TikTok. Sometimes

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Parents are going into debt to pay for kids’ breakfasts, lunches

Switching from in-person to online schooling has been hard on many families – and on their budgets.

About one-quarter of parents say they’ve gone into debt to pay for their kids’ at-home school expenses, with a large share blaming the cost of paying for their kids’ breakfasts and lunches when they switched to learning remotely from home.

new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.” data-reactid=”13″That’s according to a new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents

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what parents need to know

The good news – and more than good, in some ways it feels miraculous – is that 11-year-old Phoebe South is genuinely looking forward to starting secondary school in September. “I feel quite excited about it now,” she tells me, from a beach in Devon where she’s on holiday with her family. “I know one of my best friends is going to be in the same bubble as me, and I know quite a lot about what to expect.”

That she feels this way is tribute to all the work of her new school, Wykham Park academy in Banbury, Oxfordshire, to prepare for the influx of year 7 students in a few weeks’ time. Transition to secondary school can be difficult in the best of years – and 2020 is far from that.

“By this stage in a normal year the new year 7s would have been into school to

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Parents must be allowed to pick their poison this school year

The usual debates in education circles aren’t helping right now.

These conversations — about school choice and vouchers and equity, public vs. private vs. charter vs. home, standardized testing and screen time and district residency rules and teachers’ unions — can’t be suspended as COVID-19 spikes around the country ahead of the start of the fall semester. But in their status quo version, such debates are distorting the more pressing matter of getting through this hell year. It won’t work to shoehorn discussion of this semester into our normal policy frameworks.

Perhaps instead of sticking to those ordinary patterns, we could start with two presuppositions: Just about every option will be worse for disadvantaged students. And families should be given as many choices as possible to navigate this fall.

Parents must be allowed to pick their poison.

Consider how re-openings will affect disadvantaged students. If public schools open their doors,

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