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Alex Salmond sells major stake in his TV company ‘to help pay legal bills’

Alex Salmond hired one of Scotland's top QCs to help him fight charges - Andy Buchanan/AFP
Alex Salmond hired one of Scotland’s top QCs to help him fight charges – Andy Buchanan/AFP

Alex Salmond has sold a major stake in his TV production company to help pay his legal bills following his acquittal on sexual assault charges, The Daily Telegraph understands.

Documents lodged at Companies House show that the former First Minister is no longer listed as a person with “significant control” over Slainte Media, which he set up in 2017 when he launched a TV and stand-up career after losing his Westminster seat.

Mr Salmond is believed to retain a small stake in the company, of around 10 per cent, although Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh, the former SNP MP and his business partner, now holds more than three quarters of shares. The pair previously held half of the company each.

The company is behind Mr Salmond’s controversial weekly chat show on RT, formerly Russia Today, which Ms

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Parents are going into debt to pay for kids’ breakfasts, lunches

Switching from in-person to online schooling has been hard on many families – and on their budgets.

About one-quarter of parents say they’ve gone into debt to pay for their kids’ at-home school expenses, with a large share blaming the cost of paying for their kids’ breakfasts and lunches when they switched to learning remotely from home.

new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents found.” data-reactid=”13″That’s according to a new survey from Credit Karma, which wanted to examine how this school year could affect household finances. More than half of parents say they expect to spend slightly to significantly more on school supplies this year, the survey of more than 1,000 parents

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One woman weathers a career change and upside-down car loan to pay off $133,000 in debt

One-third of adults age 30 or younger have student loan debt, with the median burden hovering at $17,000. In Debt Diaries, we introduce you to those who took on their debt and came away with a better understanding of themselves. Their testimonials offer hope — and tools — to show that you, too, can overcome debt.

Amanda Williams is the founder and owner of Debt Free in Sunny CA, where she helps guide others to debt-free living by sharing tips, and fostering an in-person and online community. She and her husband, Josh, celebrated paying off more than $133,000 in debt in less than four years on July 5, 2018.

Amanda Williams Debt Diaries Profile (ABC Photo Illustration / Photo Courtesy Amanda Williams)

How Amanda’s student loan debt began

I took out private student loans to go to school for massage therapy. After graduating, I worked on several cruise ships

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How a little-known 1980 law slashed pay for millions of truck drivers and created big-box retail as we know it

An Illinois truck driver in 1940.
An Illinois truck driver in 1940.

Ivan Dmitri/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

  • Today’s network of big-box retailers and online shopping likely wouldn’t exist without the deregulation of the trucking industry 40 years ago this month.

  • The Motor Carrier Act of 1980, passed by President Jimmy Carter, slashed the cost of moving goods by truck.

  • It also eroded one of America’s great blue-collar jobs: truck driving.

  • A truck driver’s salary has decreased by as much as half since deregulation.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When Larry Heine was a working man he drove a truck eight hours a day. He saw his family every night, owned his home, sent both his kids to college, and took his wife on vacation to Hawaii whenever he could land some overtime.

As a member of the Teamsters, Heine was guaranteed good health care and a pension. He retired at 51, receiving a cake

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Here’s how California will cut pay under each union agreement

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration instituted pay cuts across state government in a six-week bargaining sprint that ended July 1.

All of the agreements, which the state Human Resources Department has posted online, use a personal leave program to accomplish the savings. The program institutes immediate savings but the leave time adds to the state’s long-term liabilities.

Under most of the agreements, the state is cutting workers’ pay by 9.23% — the equivalent of two days of work each month — starting with this month’s paychecks. In exchange the state is giving workers two days off they can take whenever they want to, even years from now.

The state also is suspending the contributions workers make toward their retirement health care. That eases how the cuts affect take-home pay by letting employees keep more of their money.

Many of the agreements vary in some degree from that template. Some unions are

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