people

Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic closed campuses this spring compared with fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in 2017 that they had

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‘People told me my plans for a skincare firm were crazy’

The BBC’s weekly The Boss series profiles different business leaders from around the world. This week we speak to Tata Harper, owner of the popular US skincare company of the same name.

Tata Harper’s mission to create a natural skincare range began when her stepfather was diagnosed with cancer in 2005.

His doctors advised him to adopt a healthier lifestyle. They wanted him to reduce the amount of toxins and synthetic chemicals he was exposing his body to, be it through the food he was eating, or what he was putting on his skin, from shampoo to soap.

Ms Harper says it made her realise that she, and the rest of the family, also needed to make the change.

“While I was looking for new products for him, I was also looking for new products for me, because I was trying to make my life more healthy,” says the 44-year-old

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As the president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances, and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic caused the closure of campuses this spring compared to fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in

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Churches are essential. If protesters can assemble, so should people of faith.

As states started the first of their efforts to “slow the spread” of COVID-19 in late March, including stay-at-home orders, many churches went to an online platform and Americans attended Easter services via livestream and in their pajamas.

But as the lockdown continued, and marijuana dispensaries and liquor stores were deemed essential services while many churches were not, many people of faith said the closures infringed on the right to the free exercise of religion.

Religious groups became ever more angry when protests following the death of George Floyd — some of which quickly turned to riots where demonstrators burned churches, vandalized businesses and looted — were allowed to assemble with little to no social distancing and spotty mask-wearing.

This juxtaposition exposes the double standard by which some First Amendment rights are protected more than others.

Not all rights are treated equally

As restrictions started to lift in May, many

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‘Why do we need to offer people gratuitous sex in film? There’s plenty of porn online’

Getty
Getty

Timothy Dalton has a laugh like a pantomime villain. Rich, deep and playfully thespy, it booms from our Zoom chat as his press team asks me to pivot my camera away from a nice blank wall towards a pile of unwashed laundry, to improve the lighting. The laughter erupts again when he spots my broken hoover.

I’m rewarded with a third, expansive peal when I tell the 74-year-old actor that my 10-year-old son – eavesdropping from the hall earlier as I watched the delectably surreal but 18-rated series Doom Patrol – said of Dalton’s performance as Niles “Chief” Caulder: “His voice is a massive spoiler! I mean, the posh English guy in an American action thing? You just know he’s going to turn out to be a baddie! Even if he’s a good guy for now.”

“Good for your son!” Dalton chuckles. “After I shot my very first scene

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Covid puts financial stress on young people

<span>Photograph: Yurkevych Liliia/Alamy</span>
Photograph: Yurkevych Liliia/Alamy

Raymond Christie is having sleepless nights. The 18-year-old is worrying about how difficult it will be to find work opportunities as he anticipates an upcoming recession. Christie left school at 16 with no qualifications and went into training on a construction scheme that went into administration during the pandemic. Since then, he has had to rely on his family for financial support.

“My mental health has never been as bad as it has been over the last few months since my mid-teens,” he says. “Losing my place in something that I really enjoyed doing and the overwhelming feeling of uncertainty has made me struggle with deep moods of depression and boredom. Most days, I don’t want to do anything or get up from my bed and I find it hard to motivate myself with nothing to do.”

Christie is not alone in being so worried. The debt

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From The Confessional: I Resent Religious People

It’s 2020 and these people are OVER religion being used to justify racism, bigotry, and being anti-science

If you didn’t have “religious people using religion to spread anti-vaxx propaganda, conspiracy theories, and racism every day during a global pandemic” on your 2020 bingo card, you’re not alone. Knowing all of these things exist under the guise of “religion” for many white Christians is one thing — being able to predict that your Aunt Mildred’s virtual knitting group believes cell phone towers are preventing the rapture is quite another.

If you’ve had enough of the white Christians in your life, well, so have these confessors — who are way more into confessing their feelings online than in, oh, say, a booth. With a priest.

Confessional #25790125

“POC at a protest don’t scare me, but “woke” white liberals terrify me. They have the insane zealousness of recent religious converts, and are desperate

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During Lockdown, People Just Want to Dance

After founding DanceBody in 2013, Katia Pryce began 2020 with the urge to make things a bit more digitally savvy. She had no way of knowing that within a few weeks online workouts would become the key to survival for any boutique fitness business — but her dance-based workout class, with locations in Manhattan, Los Angeles and Miami, was one of the earliest pivoters into the world of at-home workouts at the start of the pandemic, making things that much more ready to succeed in this landscape.

Pryce, founder and owner of the business, made the decision to close her studios as she was boarding a flight back to New York on March 15. During the early days of lockdown, she and the company’s chief operating officer, Courtnay Mariani, ventured to the NoMad studio to film live classes for the streaming platform. But for the most part, it’s reminded her

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The coronavirus pandemic forced many people in Connecticut to work from home. Power outages from Tropical Storm Isaias could send some back to the office.

The coronavirus pandemic forced legions of office workers in Connecticut to work at home to stop the spread, but the strategy hit a major disruption when Tropical Storm Isaias knocked out power — and in many cases, internet — to hundreds of thousands of utility customers in the state.

Major employers in the Hartford area said Wednesday they were coping with how the loss of power was affecting employees working remotely. In some cases, shifting responsibilities to employees who did have power. Some were even considering allowing some workers to come back to the office on a temporary basis.

Travelers Cos., a property-casualty insurer employs 7,000 in the Hartford area, said it is being as flexible as possible as employees deal with power loss, internet problems and storm damage.

“Colleagues from other parts of the company are able to support those who have been affected by Isaias so that we

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Conspiracy theories around COVID-19 continue to spread. Experts weigh in on why people believe them.

More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
More than 200 people gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus to protest the face mask mandate that multiple counties are under in the state. (Photo: Megan Jelinger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

When Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert, a Republican who has publicly shunned face masks, tested positive for COVID-19 on Wednesday, the news sparked a chain reaction. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced new rules that required lawmakers to wear masks on the House floor, and several members of the House revealed that they were planning to go into quarantine.

Soon after, Gohmert released a video on Twitter, revealing that he is asymptomatic. He then shared a conspiracy theory about wearing masks that, apparently, he also believes. Gohmert said he “can’t help but wonder” if he contracted COVID-19 from adjusting his mask with his hands. “It is interesting, and I don’t know about everybody, but when I have a mask

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