Press

Hong Kong security law sends jitters through city’s feisty press

Hong Kong (AFP) – Hong Kong’s status as a bastion of press freedom is in crisis as authorities toughen their line against international media and fears grow about local self-censorship under the city’s sweeping new security law.

For decades the former British colony has been a shining light for journalists in Asia, lying on the fringes of an authoritarian China where the ruling Communist Party keeps a tight grip on public opinion.

The civil liberties that have stewarded the city’s success were promised to Hong Kongers for another 50 years under a deal that returned the trading hub to Chinese rule in 1997.

But Beijing’s new national security law — imposed in response to last year’s huge and sometimes violent pro-democracy protests — has sent a shiver through the financial hub’s media landscape.

“It’s a body blow. It’s the end of press freedom as we knew it in Hong Kong,”

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‘Science should not stand in the way’ of schools reopening, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany says

WASHINGTON – White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday emphasized that schools reopening this fall shouldn’t be contingent on science surrounding coronavirus, but then claimed the “science is on our side here” as the pandemic continues unabated.

In response to a question about what President Donald Trump would say to parents who have kids in school districts that may be online-only, McEnany said: “The president has said unmistakably that he wants schools to open. And when he says open, he means open in full, kids been able to attend each and every day at their school.

“The science should not stand in the way of this,” she added, saying it is “perfectly safe” to fully reopen all classrooms. 

A parent’s guide to online school: 9 questions to ask to vet your back-to-school choices

McEnany claimed “science is on our side,” citing one study that said the risk of critical

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